Author Topic: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill  (Read 1769 times)

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2012, 05:45:18 am »
Nope. but I'll tell you about Pozole all damn day if you want.

It's one of my favorite things and I will eat it until I burst if I can. The version I make is Mexican red posole. I've considered trying green posole but the red is just SO GOOD.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”



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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2012, 10:41:56 am »
I didn't even know there WAS green pozole. Gonna have to investigate/experiment.

I love that the original pre-conquest pozole recipe calls for chopped human.
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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2012, 10:47:33 am »
I like to serve mine with a "mexican slaw" made of thinly shredded green cabbage soaked in a solution of white vinegar, ground cumin, and a couple packets of con culantro y achiote sazon goya, which in addition to its flavor lends a nice brilliant orange color to the cabbage. The briny crunchiness of the slaw provides a nice counterbalance to the rich meatiness of the pozole, and a pinch on the top of the bowl along with a couple slices of avocado and a dollop of sour cream makes for a wildly colorful presentation that also looks like the mexican flag.
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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2012, 11:35:34 am »
I've never heard of Pozole. ... apparently it's a kind of soup. If it's that good, I'll have to investigate. I bet there'll be some special and absolutely required ingredients that I'll have to hunt down, but okay :)
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Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2012, 04:20:51 pm »
I like to serve mine with a "mexican slaw" made of thinly shredded green cabbage soaked in a solution of white vinegar, ground cumin, and a couple packets of con culantro y achiote sazon goya, which in addition to its flavor lends a nice brilliant orange color to the cabbage. The briny crunchiness of the slaw provides a nice counterbalance to the rich meatiness of the pozole, and a pinch on the top of the bowl along with a couple slices of avocado and a dollop of sour cream makes for a wildly colorful presentation that also looks like the mexican flag.

I serve mine with a sideboard consisting of shredded cabbage, chopped radishes, chopped onion (white or green, I prefer green) chopped cilantro, sour cream, and lime wedges. I'll have to check out your way sometime.

The one thing I don't like about making posole is picking the germ off the kernels so they bloom properly. I always end up feeling like my thumbnails are going to fall off.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”



“All that goodness, with a frozen chicken in the middle.”
― Doktor Howl, 2014

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2012, 04:22:32 pm »
I've never heard of Pozole. ... apparently it's a kind of soup. If it's that good, I'll have to investigate. I bet there'll be some special and absolutely required ingredients that I'll have to hunt down, but okay :)

Most of the ingredients are pretty widely available, but you might have a hard time finding dried posole corn. If so, you can substitute canned hominy; it's not quite as good but it's pretty close.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”



“All that goodness, with a frozen chicken in the middle.”
― Doktor Howl, 2014

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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2012, 06:01:03 pm »
I like to serve mine with a "mexican slaw" made of thinly shredded green cabbage soaked in a solution of white vinegar, ground cumin, and a couple packets of con culantro y achiote sazon goya, which in addition to its flavor lends a nice brilliant orange color to the cabbage. The briny crunchiness of the slaw provides a nice counterbalance to the rich meatiness of the pozole, and a pinch on the top of the bowl along with a couple slices of avocado and a dollop of sour cream makes for a wildly colorful presentation that also looks like the mexican flag.

I serve mine with a sideboard consisting of shredded cabbage, chopped radishes, chopped onion (white or green, I prefer green) chopped cilantro, sour cream, and lime wedges. I'll have to check out your way sometime.

The one thing I don't like about making posole is picking the germ off the kernels so they bloom properly. I always end up feeling like my thumbnails are going to fall off.

Yeah, when I'm just doing it at home or on the ship I generally leave that stuff on the side (along with cilantro and lime wedges) so people can add or not as they choose, but for a restaurant presentation or something similar where people are expecting a fully presented dish the mexican flag condiment motif is a guaranteed winner.
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The Devil is in the details; God is in the nuance.


Some yahoo yelled at me, saying 'GIVE ME LIBERTY OR GIVE ME DEATH', and I thought, "I'm feeling generous today.  Why not BOTH?"

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2012, 09:05:30 pm »
I like to serve mine with a "mexican slaw" made of thinly shredded green cabbage soaked in a solution of white vinegar, ground cumin, and a couple packets of con culantro y achiote sazon goya, which in addition to its flavor lends a nice brilliant orange color to the cabbage. The briny crunchiness of the slaw provides a nice counterbalance to the rich meatiness of the pozole, and a pinch on the top of the bowl along with a couple slices of avocado and a dollop of sour cream makes for a wildly colorful presentation that also looks like the mexican flag.

I serve mine with a sideboard consisting of shredded cabbage, chopped radishes, chopped onion (white or green, I prefer green) chopped cilantro, sour cream, and lime wedges. I'll have to check out your way sometime.

The one thing I don't like about making posole is picking the germ off the kernels so they bloom properly. I always end up feeling like my thumbnails are going to fall off.

Yeah, when I'm just doing it at home or on the ship I generally leave that stuff on the side (along with cilantro and lime wedges) so people can add or not as they choose, but for a restaurant presentation or something similar where people are expecting a fully presented dish the mexican flag condiment motif is a guaranteed winner.

I could totally see that being a pretty impressive presentation.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”



“All that goodness, with a frozen chicken in the middle.”
― Doktor Howl, 2014

The Rev

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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #23 on: February 14, 2012, 05:56:53 pm »
Terri is working on putting a cookbook together. She figures if we can cook it and clean up after in a motorhome, then even her kids should be able to cook this food.  :)

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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #24 on: February 15, 2012, 07:02:15 pm »
Terri is working on putting a cookbook together. She figures if we can cook it and clean up after in a motorhome, then even her kids should be able to cook this food.  :)
Gonna say to you what I said to Vincent when he said he's doing that:  WANT.  So let us know when this goes down so I can BUY.

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Re: ECH's thoughts on true culinary skill
« Reply #25 on: February 15, 2012, 07:03:50 pm »
Terri is working on putting a cookbook together. She figures if we can cook it and clean up after in a motorhome, then even her kids should be able to cook this food.  :)
Gonna say to you what I said to Vincent when he said he's doing that:  WANT.  So let us know when this goes down so I can BUY.

Of course, we have talked about putting it on kindle and nook for $.99.