Author Topic: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System  (Read 58206 times)

Cain

  • Alea iacta est
  • Chekha
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 104991
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #90 on: March 12, 2012, 10:50:41 am »
Worth quoting:

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/3880030.html

Quote
The result is a lattice of mutual dependencies, networks of power in which the dominant currency is information - or, more accurately, ideological signification. The dependency is, in effect, one between different sectors of power which monopolise and strategically disburse different kinds of information. The journalistic dependency on the aforementioned sources is only reinforced by the existence of a competitive newspaper market, where a number of papers vie for access to the same streams of information. And in a context of declining profitability and reduced readership such as has been the case in the UK market for some time, there is a premium on the novel, dramatic, and thus far occluded. At the same time, the institutions they depend upon have a definable interest in creating illicit flows of disavowable information, whether to create issues around which they can mobilise opinion and organise existing projects, or to vilify and disorient opponents.

We have seen that this is particularly so of the police, whose role in dispensing law also gives them a privileged position in defining a wide range of social situations. The information upon which criminality is determined, court action proceeds and wider social and political issues are identified, to a large extent flows upward from officers involved in routine 'enforcement'. It is a logical entailment of this role that police will seek to directly define issues pertinent to their role via the media. Importantly, there are no clear boundaries between licit and illicit conduct in this regard. A witness statement to the Leveson Inquiry from Jacqueline Hames, a Metropolitan Police officer and former presenter of the BBC program Crimewatch, suggests that this indeterminacy could be settled by better training and a wider awareness of guidelines. But this is a 'technological' solution to a non-technical problem: the same professional autonomy that allows police to define the situations they work in - to 'work up' charges where they are so motivated, to stop and search, to detain without charge, to deploy strategic violence and then write up the reports which rationalise their approach in the language of bureaucracy – empowers the police to define their relations with reporters.

This brings the media into the field of 'parapolitics', an area in which the exercise of political and ideological power is conducted in forms and according to hierarchies not formally recognised in the 'public' sphere. 'Parapolitics' is a term that is usually associated with researchers into 'conspiracy theory', a field that is blighted with kookiness, silliness and 'infotainment' posing as revelation.  But when theory becomes scandalous fact, there is no reason to be coy. The networks of mutual dependency that I have described are effectively a 'conspiracy machine', an ensemble of mechanisms that are apt to produce constant flows of illicitly obtained information, and the constant maintenance of relations which keep the flows going. The staggering range and depth of the Murdoch empire's involvement in criminal enterprise at various levels over many years, of which it is prudent to assume we know only a fraction, would have been impossible to sustain otherwise.

And this enjoins us to re-phrase familiar questions in a different light. It is common, for example, to despairingly ask how we can root out the culture of corruption and sleaze in journalism. Or, one might ask, how far up the chain does the corruption go? As if, were we to identify Rupert Murdoch as conspirator-in-chief, a knowing agent of political corruption, the problem would be resolved.  In reality, despite Murdoch's hands-on approach to running his tabloids, and without wishing to foreclose future investigation, it is highly improbable that the Dirty Digger personally would have dug in the dirt. The real question, for those who do not want this situation to be endlessly repeated, is: what sort of media would behave differently?  And, as a corollary: what sort of society would give rise to a better media?

Parapolitics is pretty much the perfect word to describe this.  Pretty much my entire background in political science could be said to have a parapolitical slant, what with my focus on questions of terrorism and security (which naturally have a certain covert element, and there is a back and forth between terrorists and intelligence agencies which is rarely acknowledged outside of those circles).

What this shows, to my mind, is that the parapolitical slant is equally appropriate to the actions of so called liberal democracies, and not even in the context of security, where it would be still somewhat understandable, if contestable (the actions of covert operations like Gladio having a sensible rationale, if quickly subverted to more immediate political purposes), but for the simple practice of gaining and holding onto power.

In practice, politics in most western countries takes the form of corporatism (ie; fascism), where government acts to balance the interests of various groups, including but not limited to corporations (a common misunderstanding of corporatism is that corporations form the ruling class.  This is not true.  Corporatism refers to all powerful interest groups with a top-down hierarchy, including political parties, trade unions and religious societies), and the interests of said groups is communicated through back-channels as to avoid democratic accountability.  As a result, the various agents involved in this form ad-hoc agreements whereby sharing of information is reciprocated among these covert channels, allowing for the benefit of all parties involved.

That this happens to correspond with Assange's theory of "conspiracy as governance" is not just coincidence, I think you will agree.

Cain

  • Alea iacta est
  • Chekha
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 104991
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #91 on: March 12, 2012, 03:55:59 pm »
Or not, because, apparently, no-one cares.

Demolition_Squid

  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 3551
  • Bank?! OH SHIIIIIIIIT!
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #92 on: March 12, 2012, 04:05:35 pm »
No, I thought this was amazing. Particularly the take on the police on the previous page. I'm not sure what to add, other than that at this point, I would be more surprised if there wasn't a high level conspiracy and deep rooted corruption throughout the police.

It would not surprise me if the Conservatives were in bed with the news of the world for this, and should all this come to light...

Well, I wish I could say I think it'd bring the government down, but I'm not that optimistic. It might reinvigorate the protests this year, though, and that could be a very good thing.
Truly, though our element is time,
We are not suited to the long perspectives
Open at each instant of our lives.
They link us to our losses: worse,
They show us what we have as it once was,
Blindingly undiminished, just as though
By acting differently, we could have kept it so.

-Reference Back, Phillip Larkin

LMNO

  • Lubricated and Rabid Lungfish of Impending Sexdoom™
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 87066
  • Internet Fuckweasel of Haunted Pork Dimensions.
    • View Profile
    • Earfatigue Productions: When it has to sound like you give a shit.
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #93 on: March 12, 2012, 04:36:34 pm »
Parapolitics is a good word for describing what I've been feeling is almost inevitable when you have an established structure: several groups of unestablished power bases work behind the structure to influence it.  That's about right, yeah?

Q. G. Pennyworth

  • Slimy Thing Who
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 82747
  • QUEEN BITCH OF FLYERS
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #94 on: March 12, 2012, 05:05:45 pm »
Cain posts are hard to digest first thing in the morning.
Overheating Pheremone Pustule of Last Saturday's Jiggle Fun| _xgeWireToEvent: Unknown extension 131, this should never happen.

Don't fucking judge me, I've got tentacles for a face.

Junkenstein

  • Technically-Oriented & Horribly Mobile Crecy of Crab Lice.
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 114864
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #95 on: March 12, 2012, 11:19:19 pm »
Or not, because, apparently, no-one cares.

The problems and issues presented are large and complex. You need to tell us what to care about specifically.

In regard to the police/government/press triangle I would suggest it logical to consider ancillary groups equally likely to be involved. It seems like a giant multi-sided prisoners dilemma. No one can implicate everyone directly, those that are are relatively isolated and able to be replaced by a similar person with an identical remit.

It seems so broken that reform is a joke of an option. The transparency that would have to be introduced will most likely be portrayed as privacy breaching or excess paperwork "taking officers off the streets" style.

Overall, coverage of the Levenson Enquiry has been unremarkable. The full transcripts and statements are there, and stuff comes out of the daily sessions frequently that makes you think "Fuck, this person runs a national newspaper and doesn't know what ethics means"

Every 20 minutes, a question or quote like that. No wonder the world is fucked.
Nine naked Men just walking down the road will cause a heap of trouble for all concerned.

N E T

  • Turbo-Charged Marmoset of Inappropriate Public Displays of Horrid Affection
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 18494
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #96 on: March 13, 2012, 05:25:09 am »
That this happens to correspond with Assange's theory of "conspiracy as governance" is not just coincidence, I think you will agree.

Indeed.

What do you think are some of the most effective ways to subvert, combat or otherwise reduce the influence of corporatism?


You need to tell us what to care about specifically.

Think for yourself, schmuck.
“There are some defeats more triumphant than victories.” - M I C H E L   D E   M O N T A I G N E

Junkenstein

  • Technically-Oriented & Horribly Mobile Crecy of Crab Lice.
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 114864
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #97 on: March 13, 2012, 06:01:32 am »
That this happens to correspond with Assange's theory of "conspiracy as governance" is not just coincidence, I think you will agree.

Indeed.

What do you think are some of the most effective ways to subvert, combat or otherwise reduce the influence of corporatism?


You need to tell us what to care about specifically.

Think for yourself, schmuck.

Poorly translated sarcasm. Imagine I said it with a monocle and suitably raised eyebrow.
Or I may just need really the guidance that only anonymous strangers can provide.

More seriously, Cain's a total fucker. Every time I read a post its spewing forth so many angles it gives me papercuts before I've even determined which book(s) I now need to read to gain an idiots level of understanding.

Fuck you Cain. With your information and your words. Keep it up. You Bastard.

Also, Called it, got distracted and forgot to link it in
http://www.principiadiscordia.com/forum/index.php/topic,11728.1080/msg,1155567.html
« Last Edit: March 13, 2012, 06:11:01 am by Junkenstein »
Nine naked Men just walking down the road will cause a heap of trouble for all concerned.

Telarus

  • Fictional Ego
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 12309
  • Ratcheting Metallic Sex Doll of The End Times
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #98 on: March 13, 2012, 08:56:33 am »
Daaaaaaamn. Thanks for passing that on Cain. That's going to take a while to digest.
Telarus, KSC,
.__.  Keeper of the Contradictory Cephalopod, Zenarchist Swordsman,
(0o)  Tender to the Edible Zen Garden, Ratcheting Metallic Sex Doll of The End Times,
/||\   Episkopos of the Amorphous Dreams Cabal

Join the Doll Underground! Experience the Phantasmagorical Safari!

N E T

  • Turbo-Charged Marmoset of Inappropriate Public Displays of Horrid Affection
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 18494
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #99 on: March 13, 2012, 01:49:57 pm »
That this happens to correspond with Assange's theory of "conspiracy as governance" is not just coincidence, I think you will agree.

Indeed.

What do you think are some of the most effective ways to subvert, combat or otherwise reduce the influence of corporatism?


You need to tell us what to care about specifically.

Think for yourself, schmuck.

Poorly translated sarcasm. Imagine I said it with a monocle and suitably raised eyebrow.
Or I may just need really the guidance that only anonymous strangers can provide.

Hazard of the Internets: A lack of vocal cues causes yet another 9 page pile up at your local forum and fuck you assface, tonight at 10.
“There are some defeats more triumphant than victories.” - M I C H E L   D E   M O N T A I G N E

Junkenstein

  • Technically-Oriented & Horribly Mobile Crecy of Crab Lice.
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 114864
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #100 on: March 13, 2012, 02:56:01 pm »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17349578
Quote
Police said one woman and five men were held on suspicion of conspiracy to pervert the course of justice, as part of the Operation Weeting hacking probe

Including Rebekah Brooks and husband. Still waiting on Murdoch lawyers to enter stage left from what I can find. This is the third arrest for Brooks, still no charges reported. Waiting for someone to slip and implicate her directly would be my guess.

Stuff like
Quote
Mrs Brooks was arrested under Operation Weeting last July on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, before being released on police bail. She has also been arrested as part of the Operation Elveden investigation on suspicion of corruption
Leads me to think everyone knows she's involved at the highest levels, and probably as culpable as one person can be here. Proving it seems to be a bit of a bugger.

Edit- Brooks has been arrested twice before, not once.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2012, 04:45:53 pm by Junkenstein »
Nine naked Men just walking down the road will cause a heap of trouble for all concerned.

N E T

  • Turbo-Charged Marmoset of Inappropriate Public Displays of Horrid Affection
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 18494
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #101 on: March 13, 2012, 03:19:17 pm »
Ah yes, the old "bad apple" bit:

www.nytimes.com/2012/03/13/business/tough-reviews-ahead-for-banks-in-26-billion-mortgage-deal.html

Quote
The banks have largely focused the blame for mistakes on low-level employees, attributing many of the problems to the surge in the volume of foreclosures after the housing market collapsed and the economy weakened in 2008.

But the report concludes that managers were aware of the problems and did nothing to correct them. The shortcuts were directed by managers in some cases, according to the report, which is by the inspector general of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The examination is among the most extensive to date of the banks’ foreclosure practices, which caused a national uproar and prompted a $25 billion settlement between the banks and the government that was filed in federal court Monday.

“There are some defeats more triumphant than victories.” - M I C H E L   D E   M O N T A I G N E

Junkenstein

  • Technically-Oriented & Horribly Mobile Crecy of Crab Lice.
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 114864
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #102 on: March 13, 2012, 03:28:16 pm »
Woah

Quote
One vice president said documents in her department were checked only for “formatting and spelling errors,” not the underlying figures or facts in the case.

Seriously, how do I get that job? I can spell like a rapper reading a dictionary on speed.

Quote
In one review of 36 foreclosures at JPMorgan Chase, the bank was able to find documents explaining what the borrowers purportedly owed in only four cases. And in three of those four instances, the underlying documents proved incorrect.

Some lawyer, somewhere is thinking class action lawsuit. I would have thought of all institutions a BANK would at least be able to prove what you owe. That being the entire business really.

Nine naked Men just walking down the road will cause a heap of trouble for all concerned.

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

  • v=1/3πr2h
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 687093
  • The sky tastes like red exuberance.
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #103 on: March 13, 2012, 10:27:54 pm »
Or not, because, apparently, no-one cares.

It's actually exactly the kind of thing that I'm interested in, but the combination of being hung-over for a week due to Alty's intoxicating presence and trying to study (which I am NOT effective at when I'm hung-over) had me rendered fairly useless at the time that you posted it. I'll go back and read it after I finish my homework tonight.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”


Mesozoic Mister Nigel

  • v=1/3πr2h
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 687093
  • The sky tastes like red exuberance.
    • View Profile
Re: News Stories Which Highlight the Structure of the System
« Reply #104 on: March 14, 2012, 09:31:22 pm »
Hot holy shit, that is some twisted, twisted stuff.

Kind of puts most penny-ante conspiracy theories to shame. I don't think we're in Kansas anymore, Toto.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”