Author Topic: Mohammed Merah and the French neofascist-Islamist alliance  (Read 370 times)

Cain

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Mohammed Merah and the French neofascist-Islamist alliance
« on: April 06, 2012, 09:16:26 pm »
http://exiledonline.com/mohammed-merah-alleged-murderer-of-several-muslim-french-soldiers-and-jews-is-part-of-frances-muslim-extremist-christian-neo-nazi-alliance/

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Now that the Toulouse killer has been unmasked as a radical Muslim, and not a white Christian Islamophobe like Anders Behring Breivik, the French extreme right can breathe a sigh of relief. Marine Le Pen, the far-right National Front leader vying for the French presidency, is apparently seeking to ride the tragedy all the way to victory. Today, she declared, “The Islamic fundamentalist threat has been underestimated in our country and political-religious groups are developing due to a certain laxism.”

But a glance into the recent activities of Forsanne Alizza exposes the irony of Le Pen’s words. Indeed, Forsanne Alizza has been engaged in an open alliance with neofascist figures and extreme right-wing Catholic groups who emerged from the core of Le Pen’s National Front party and who comprise some of her most loyal supporters.

The de facto Salafist-neofascist alliance was forged in October 2011 when two right-wing Catholic groups, Action Francaise (French Action) and Renouveau Francais (French Renewal) staged a morality crusade against a performance in Paris of Romeo Castallucci’s play, “On the Concept of the Face of God.” At first, the rightists tried to halt the performance of the play on the anti-religious discrimination grounds. Their grievances focused on a scene of a son cleaning his father’s feces off the floor while images of Jesus Christ flashed on a projection screen. After failing to stop the play, the groups organized a 10-day protest vigil outside Theatre de la Ville, attempting to stop ticket holders from entering through various means of intimidation. Before one performance, seven far-right activists were arrested while attempting to enter the theater with concealed knives, teargas, and stones.

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Gabriac was present along with 300 Catholic rightists at the October 29 protest at Theatre de la Ville. There and during a march earlier that day in Paris, the right-wing Catholics were joined by members of the Salafist splinter group Forsanne Alizza. According to the French blog, Poisson Rouge, Forsanne Alizza issued a press release on its website calling for members to protest with the Catholic fundamentalists. And so Forsanne Alizza activists marched side-by-side with members of Renouveau Francais and Action Francaise, echoed their chants, and expressed solidarity against “Christianophobia.”

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Though Le Pen will spend the coming weeks holding forth about the supposed failure of the French government to crush Forzanne Alizza, there was a time when some of her most committed political-religious partisans united with the group that allegedly helped inspire the Toulouse killer in a crusade against the thing they hated more than anything else — more than Islam and even mass immigration. That thing was liberalism itself.

No comment, except to sigh, and look longingly at my liquor cabinet...

Kai

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Re: Mohammed Merah and the French neofascist-Islamist alliance
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2012, 10:29:46 pm »
How exactly do you think this is going to reach a head?
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Cain

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Re: Mohammed Merah and the French neofascist-Islamist alliance
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2012, 10:57:07 pm »
I honestly cannot say.  I cannot see such an alliance being tenable in the long-term...but the French Far Right are very influenced by Alain de Benoist and the Slavic Neo-Eurasianists, who are a lot more comfortable with Islam, especially if its shafting liberal democracy alongside them.  They might not want Muslims in France, but they appreciate the more martial and austere aspects of radical Islam.

The thing is, the Islamic aspect of this won't be a threat in the long-term unless it organizes politically...and I don't think there is a viable constituency in France for their views.  French immigrants typically integrate quite well (given the alternative is "or get out", this is not surprising), and so while such an alliance might be more of a political threat in another country, like the UK say, the French state is likely secure in the short and medium term.