Author Topic: Anybody look at Ukraine lately?  (Read 20590 times)

ivan

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Re: Anybody look at Ukraine lately?
« Reply #315 on: April 11, 2015, 01:33:01 pm »
Direct political activism of ukrainian nationalists (Praviy Sektor):

https://translate.google.ru/translate?sl=ru&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=ru&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Flenta.ru%2Fnews%2F2015%2F04%2F09%2Flustration%2F&edit-text=



In Ivano-Frankivsk head of justice department rolled into a garbage can

Doktor Howl

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Re: Anybody look at Ukraine lately?
« Reply #316 on: April 12, 2015, 05:52:20 am »
Direct political activism of ukrainian nationalists (Praviy Sektor):

https://translate.google.ru/translate?sl=ru&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=ru&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Flenta.ru%2Fnews%2F2015%2F04%2F09%2Flustration%2F&edit-text=



In Ivano-Frankivsk head of justice department rolled into a garbage can

I see Charley Sheen is WINNING again.

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: Anybody look at Ukraine lately?
« Reply #317 on: April 12, 2015, 09:51:13 pm »
Direct political activism of ukrainian nationalists (Praviy Sektor):

https://translate.google.ru/translate?sl=ru&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=ru&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Flenta.ru%2Fnews%2F2015%2F04%2F09%2Flustration%2F&edit-text=



In Ivano-Frankivsk head of justice department rolled into a garbage can

I see Charley Sheen is WINNING again.

 :lulz:
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”


ivan

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Re: Anybody look at Ukraine lately?
« Reply #318 on: April 13, 2015, 07:33:56 pm »
ODD# I(e)/5,v;22Dsc3180
The Soviet Navy operated a research facility 44.5800°N 33.4023°E to explore military uses of marine mammals at Kazachya Bukhta, near Sevastopol. The Russian military is believed to have closed its marine mammal program in the early 1990s. In 2000, the press reported that dolphins trained to kill by the Soviet Navy had been sold to Iran.
Ukraine's spy dolphins switch allegiance to Russia
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/ukraine/10724506/Ukraines-spy-dolphins-switch-allegiance-to-Russia.html
Dolphin communication
http://67.55.50.201/lilly/dolphin01.html
Return of Dolphins to the Wild
http://67.55.50.201/lilly/interspeciesx.html

Cain

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Re: Anybody look at Ukraine lately?
« Reply #319 on: October 12, 2015, 12:26:52 pm »
For those of you who haven't been keeping track, this Foreign Policy article is a good starting point of the current state of play:

Quote
Ukrainians are seething with anger over the plunging quality of life and the government’s failure to purge the country of oligarchy and corruption, the very issues that ignited the 2013-2014 Maidan uprising in the first place. This is not Kremlin propaganda. A Washington Post article in August spoke of the “sense that last year’s wave of protests delivered little but fresh misery.” A recent Atlantic Council report states that “f the Ukrainian government does not follow through with an ambitious reform agenda, public support for reforms will wane while dissatisfaction will increase, threatening political stability and the country’s successful future.” Even George Soros, a stalwart backer of Kiev, wrote this month that “the general population is increasingly dissatisfied both with the slow speed of reforms and the continued decline in living standards.”

If Ukraine were a stable country, this mounting public disillusionment would manifest itself through an unseating of the ruling party in the next election or perhaps through a referendum of no confidence in the administration. But Ukraine — fresh off a revolution followed by 19 months of war — is far from stable. Its citizens have more weapons than they do trust in their government. If the average Ukrainian can’t scrape together enough money to feed and heat his family in the brutal Ukrainian winter, he will blame Kiev (and the West) and express his outrage not at the polls, but in the streets.

Quote
As with many things in Ukraine, the far right’s numbers, as well as the extent of Kiev’s control over their battalions, remains nebulous. In July, Right Sector’s Dmytro Yarosh was able to call up around 5,000 members for a march in Kiev, though how many of the participants were fighters as opposed to party supporters is unclear. Likewise, the Azov Battalion, which has been banned from receiving U.S. training and weapons by Congress, has been nominally under Kiev’s control when it comes to fighting separatists; where Azov’s loyalty lies when it comes to facing Kiev is an open question.

What is clear is that these groups are capable of sowing immense chaos and carnage, as was proved on Aug. 31, when grenade-wielding thugs from Svoboda killed four Ukrainian National Guardsmen and wounded 138 others in front of the parliament building in Kiev. This attack was far from the first time that the far right has threatened Kiev or spilled blood: On July 11, Right Sector was involved in a deadly shootout with police in the western Ukrainian town of Mukacheve, and members of several battalions have threatened a coup after the fighting in the east is concluded.

Up to this point, more or less, the far right and Kiev have shared a common enemy: Russian-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine. But as the violence in the eastern regions abates, the ultranationalists — including their affiliated (and heavily armed) battalions — are turning their attention inward. Over the past several months, these groups have been increasingly ratcheting up the pressure on Poroshenko, declaring his administration to be an “internal occupation” and calling, as Right Sector put it, for the “new phase” of the revolution.

Kiev and the far right are at a stalemate. Poroshenko doesn’t have the power to disband the ultranationalists (the administration’s response to the Aug. 31 bloodshed has been restricted to a handful of arrests), but the far-right factions aren’t able to openly move on Kiev either. For that, they’ll need to have everyday people protesting in the streets. They need another Maidan.

Quote
Under the most optimistic scenario, a far-right uprising would greatly destabilize Ukraine; Poroshenko wouldn’t be able to continue implementing IMF reforms if he were busy fending off an armed insurrection in the middle of Kiev. At worst, this would set off a chain of events that would rapidly turn the country into a fractured, failed state of 45 million people in the middle of Europe.