Author Topic: "How We All Miss the Point on School Shootings"  (Read 2309 times)

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: "How We All Miss the Point on School Shootings"
« Reply #30 on: June 15, 2014, 04:13:35 am »
Oh, undoubtedly you are right... it's just that when it comes to my wife, I want her to be as safe as humanly possible.  I don't want to sound like I'm mental illness witch hunter, but when Nigel mentioned that aspect of the bullying phenomena, the story (which is still ongoing, that incident I mentioned only happened a matter of weeks ago) popped into my head.

There's a certain level of self-preservation that means that it really doesn't matter what kind of crazy it is; when your alarm-bells go off you should listen to them and get away as far and as fast as reasonably possible.

The sad thing is that this does mean that a lot of mentally-ill people who need help become isolated, and society does need better mental health care and intervention, but at the same time any given person's mental health is not your responsibility, and your safety IS.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”


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Re: "How We All Miss the Point on School Shootings"
« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2014, 03:37:26 pm »
Oh, undoubtedly you are right... it's just that when it comes to my wife, I want her to be as safe as humanly possible.  I don't want to sound like I'm mental illness witch hunter, but when Nigel mentioned that aspect of the bullying phenomena, the story (which is still ongoing, that incident I mentioned only happened a matter of weeks ago) popped into my head.

There's a certain level of self-preservation that means that it really doesn't matter what kind of crazy it is; when your alarm-bells go off you should listen to them and get away as far and as fast as reasonably possible.

The sad thing is that this does mean that a lot of mentally-ill people who need help become isolated, and society does need better mental health care and intervention, but at the same time any given person's mental health is not your responsibility, and your safety IS.

Sometimes isolation further complicates the condition.

I had always hoped that instead of society coming into better provisions for accessible mental health care and intervention that more members of society would pick up an increased interest in better understanding toward such individuals. It's not an adversarial view, it's just a little more in depth. Personal safety and preservation should be a primary concern and focus but for some of us the levels of compassion and emotional boundaries prohibit the expected distancing that is common in isolating. Also, in some cases, there can be severe separation anxiety and trauma induced hysteria eruptions that are often perceived as temper tantrums. Long term, the flare ups have the potential to change the biochemical levels of the sufferer and ensue autoimmune disorders. One of the more passionate quests that may help in adequate and effective isolation methods is doing so and taking the measures necessary that limit, if not prevent detrimental levels of anxiety, trauma, and such.

It is something that ultimately affects to us all. *hearts* as *heads*
Within the grip of Err.... some are fucked in the head by a fist of fire.