Author Topic: Jill Bolte Taylor's stroke of insight  (Read 670 times)

Dildo Argentino

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Jill Bolte Taylor's stroke of insight
« on: January 19, 2015, 09:50:33 pm »
The TED talk

Masochistic, I know, but I am curious to read what you people think of this talk. If it is preposterous of me to ask, just ignore or berate as seems fit. I promise I will not volunteer an opinion.
Not too keen on rigor, myself - reminds me of mortis

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: Jill Bolte Taylor's stroke of insight
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2015, 11:16:32 pm »
The TED talk

Masochistic, I know, but I am curious to read what you people think of this talk. If it is preposterous of me to ask, just ignore or berate as seems fit. I promise I will not volunteer an opinion.

That's actually one of my favorites, just because being able to hear a firsthand account of a major stroke told by a neurobiologist is pretty awesome.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”


Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: Jill Bolte Taylor's stroke of insight
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2015, 11:17:59 pm »
I also hope that she's a member of the Luxuriant Flowing Hair Club for Scientists.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”


Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: Jill Bolte Taylor's stroke of insight
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2015, 11:20:49 pm »
I also have criticisms about her conclusions, but the story itself is so strong that I am reluctant to detract from it by nitpicking her conclusions.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”


Dildo Argentino

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Re: Jill Bolte Taylor's stroke of insight
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2015, 01:45:03 pm »
Isn't after a very strong story the most important point to nitpick about conclusions? My 16-year-old son (who brought it to my attention) had no qualms about nitpicking: he said she has no grounds to assume that everybody else's left-brain and right-brain personalities are all that similar to her own, and that many people's right-brain personas are probably scary as fuck.
Not too keen on rigor, myself - reminds me of mortis

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: Jill Bolte Taylor's stroke of insight
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2015, 04:01:55 pm »
It's a very strong eight-year-old story that has probably already been nitpicked to death.

And there is a surprisingly strong consistency in brain function trends across individuals, although there is also variation.

And you're just here to be a pedantic argumentative asshole, so I have no idea why I responded to this in the first place. It's not like you give a fuck about my analysis, despite neurobiology being my field of study. For that matter, it's not like you've offered any analysis or criticism of your own.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”