Principia Discordia

Principia Discordia => Principia Discussion => Topic started by: Telarus on December 04, 2008, 06:59:08 pm

Title: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on December 04, 2008, 06:59:08 pm
I'm going to use this thread to store short Zen and Zenarchist written pieces. Feel free to contribute or comment.

Quote
If your mind is fixed on a certain spot,
it will be seized by that spot, and
no activities can be performed efficiently.
Not to fix your mind anywhere is essential.
Not fixed anywhere, the mind is everywhere.
The Original Mind is like water which flows freely,
whereas the deluded mind is like ice.
There is a passage in the Diamond Sutra that says:
“The mind should operate without abiding anywhere.”

- Takuan (1573-1645)

I have experienced the reality of this while swordfighting. If I focus on one thing (arc of opponents blade, or his center-of-gravity-wieght-shifting, or my stance) the mind starts to get hyperfixated on that 'point' and starts editing out sense data (my peripherial vision dims, my hearing edits out ambient sound, etc). this has a serious negative effect when you're trying to stop someone from cutting off a limb or killing you.

This is also the concept that makes television so insidiously addictive.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on December 04, 2008, 07:15:49 pm

I have experienced the reality of this while swordfighting. If I focus on one thing (arc of opponents blade, or his center-of-gravity-wieght-shifting, or my stance) the mind starts to get hyperfixated on that 'point' and starts editing out sense data (my peripherial vision dims, my hearing edits out ambient sound, etc). this has a serious negative effect when you're trying to stop someone from cutting off a limb or killing you.

Very true. I find that focus in swordfighting is very different from focus in circuit building. If' I'm soldering something I'm focused on the wire, the solder, the iron tip and nothing else... If I focus like that in fencing, I die. In fancing, the focus is more like an alertness... the former seems like a tight beam flashlight, while the other seems like a broader spotlight on my opponent, rather than just his sword tip, or my dagger, or if my pace is right, etc.

In practice, all of those are important to focus on, but in the fight, its almost as if I have to rely on the robot to run those things, while I'm alert to the opponent and what they're up to.

Nice quote Telarus.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: fomenter on December 04, 2008, 07:40:23 pm
this reminds me of a sci-fi trilogy i read about sword fighting mind creatures on some planet colony, lots of mind of no mind poetry kones , i cant remember or find the books though and it is irritating me

i think the creature they fought were mushin (or a variation of the word)
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on December 04, 2008, 07:55:06 pm
Also: Example of failing to focus correctly:

http://www.principiadiscordia.com/forum/index.php?topic=18730.0

 :lulz:
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on December 09, 2008, 12:28:27 am
Quote
In every human heart, there is a Book of Truth, bound with worn-out strings and torn bamboo-papers. In every human heart, there is also a Symphony of Nature, drowned out by sensual song and voluptuous dance. One must sweep away all externals and search inward in order to experience joy.

- Hung Ying-ming (1596)

The "strings and paper" refer to our overly reused abstract symbolic and linguistic languages, they are worn out so toss them away. Our Symphony is drowned out by sensual song and voluptuous dance. These are the rhythm of personal narrative and the sensuous but static dance of Karma. Sweep these away to rock out to your Original Beat.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Cain on December 09, 2008, 10:55:59 am
I have a collection of Zen/martial arts quotes.  Here are a few:

Quote
"To practice Zen or the Martial Arts, you must live intensely, wholeheartedly, without reserve — as if you might die in the next instant."

- Taisen Deshimaru


Quote
"The Way of the Sword and the Way of Zen are identical, for they have the same purpose — that of killing the ego."

- Yamada Jirokichi


Quote
"To confuse the indivisible nature of reality with the conceptual pigeonholes of language is the basic ignorance from which Zen seeks to free us. The ultimate answers to existence are not to be found in intellectual concepts and philosophies, however sophisticated, but rather in a level of direct nonconceptual experience."

- from Games Zen Masters Play, by Robert Sohl and Audrey Carr (p. 15)


Quote
"So, instead of telling us what the problem is, Zen insists that our whole trouble is just our failure to realize that there is no problem. And, of course, this means that there is no solution, either."

- Bruce Lee


Quote
"When the swordsman stands against his opponent, he is not to think of the opponent, nor of his enemy’s sword movements. He just stands there with his sword which, forgetful of all technique, is ready only to follow the dictates of the unconscious. The man has effaced himself as the wielder of the sword. When he strikes, it is not the man but the sword in the hand of the unconscious that strikes."

- Takuan
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on December 10, 2008, 01:37:00 am
Love the Takuan quote. The others are pretty damn good too, thanks!
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: fomenter on December 10, 2008, 02:33:58 am
this reminds me of a sci-fi trilogy i read about sword fighting mind creatures on some planet colony, lots of mind of no mind poetry kones , i cant remember or find the books though and it is irritating me

i think the creature they fought were mushin (or a variation of the word)

OK this is making me batty i can't remember this book's title or author, any one know it? or know how to search a book from vague recollections? i would recommend it based on what i remember but i read it as a teenager, my impression of its quality may be a bit iffy..i was going to look it up and quote some poetry kones from it here in this thread but  :argh!: brain fart
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: fomenter on December 10, 2008, 02:50:31 am
pbthhhhheee fart released, the author is Dennis Schmidt the books are wayfarer, kensho, satori and wanderer

Back Cover:

According to every reading it was a paradise planet- a warm and fecund world far more desirable than the teeming, polluted warrens of the planet-city that Earth had become. Yet when the last of the one-way trans-ports had landed its cargo of Pilgrims, the men of Earth were to learn of a danger that no machine could detect, and against which no machine could defend them-the Mushin, mental entities that stimulate and amplify the dark streak of violence that lies near the core of every human being.

Seven generations would pass before a descendant of the scattered remnant of the original colonists would be ready to face the power of the Mushin. But first he would have to learn to wield the weapon that is no weapon-and that only where there is no Will, is there a Way...

His name is Jerome. This is his story. He is the WAYFARER

Dennis Schmidt has written a fast-paced, tightly plotted adventure novel that skillfully blends traditional science-fiction themes with martial arts and meditation. But Way-farer is more than that: it is a novel that may well change the way you view reality itself.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Subtract Eight! on December 10, 2008, 03:25:45 am
I have a collection of Zen/martial arts quotes.  Here are a few:

Quote
"To practice Zen or the Martial Arts, you must live intensely, wholeheartedly, without reserve — as if you might die in the next instant."

- Taisen Deshimaru


Quote
"The Way of the Sword and the Way of Zen are identical, for they have the same purpose — that of killing the ego."

- Yamada Jirokichi
Wow Bruce Lee's got some zen chops.


Quote
"To confuse the indivisible nature of reality with the conceptual pigeonholes of language is the basic ignorance from which Zen seeks to free us. The ultimate answers to existence are not to be found in intellectual concepts and philosophies, however sophisticated, but rather in a level of direct nonconceptual experience."

- from Games Zen Masters Play, by Robert Sohl and Audrey Carr (p. 15)


Quote
"So, instead of telling us what the problem is, Zen insists that our whole trouble is just our failure to realize that there is no problem. And, of course, this means that there is no solution, either."

- Bruce Lee


Quote
"When the swordsman stands against his opponent, he is not to think of the opponent, nor of his enemy’s sword movements. He just stands there with his sword which, forgetful of all technique, is ready only to follow the dictates of the unconscious. The man has effaced himself as the wielder of the sword. When he strikes, it is not the man but the sword in the hand of the unconscious that strikes."

- Takuan
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on December 10, 2008, 06:02:08 am
"When you cease trying to control and manipulate your experience, meditation spontaneously happens." -(The Impact of Awakening, pg 23)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adyashanti
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Richter on December 11, 2008, 04:55:59 pm

I have experienced the reality of this while swordfighting. If I focus on one thing (arc of opponents blade, or his center-of-gravity-wieght-shifting, or my stance) the mind starts to get hyperfixated on that 'point' and starts editing out sense data (my peripherial vision dims, my hearing edits out ambient sound, etc). this has a serious negative effect when you're trying to stop someone from cutting off a limb or killing you.

Very true. I find that focus in swordfighting is very different from focus in circuit building. If' I'm soldering something I'm focused on the wire, the solder, the iron tip and nothing else... If I focus like that in fencing, I die. In fancing, the focus is more like an alertness... the former seems like a tight beam flashlight, while the other seems like a broader spotlight on my opponent, rather than just his sword tip, or my dagger, or if my pace is right, etc.

In practice, all of those are important to focus on, but in the fight, its almost as if I have to rely on the robot to run those things, while I'm alert to the opponent and what they're up to.

Nice quote Telarus.

I find it's helpful to cultivate a "Thousand Yard Stare" when I'm at the swordplay.  Look at EVERYTHING at once, evenly, without focusing on any one point.  It's kind of like setting your eyes to pick up any motion, but not focus in directly on it.
This is effective both for seeing motions that a single pointed awareness would miss, as well as keeping your opponent from seeing where you're staring. 
To them it looks like you've "glazed over" or "gone away", which some find unsettling.
You can choose to stare at a unique part of them, (ex: leg), and then strike somewhere different. 
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Cain on December 11, 2008, 04:58:54 pm
I've always found that easy.  Since I'm somewhat short sighted anyway, I suspect my eyes and brain compensate for lack of definition and clarity at distance with focusing more on picking up movements.  Or I just practiced sparring too much.  Either way, it seems something I can very easily slip into.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Richter on December 11, 2008, 05:09:58 pm
Same here, I'm pretty blind without the glasses, and they don't fit inside my helm.  (I've got contacts, but still not sure I like playing with them, I do OK as a "blindfighter")

I think I first noticed it working at the summer camp.  We'd take shift being supplementary lifegaurds at the pool, and I found myself scanning passively for panicked movement or sound. 
I did the same when watching groups of kids at the program I worked at, and the clinicians thought I had symptoms of PTSD :lulz:
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on December 11, 2008, 06:42:18 pm
SNIP'D

Very true. I find that focus in swordfighting is very different from focus in circuit building. If' I'm soldering something I'm focused on the wire, the solder, the iron tip and nothing else... If I focus like that in fencing, I die. In fancing, the focus is more like an alertness... the former seems like a tight beam flashlight, while the other seems like a broader spotlight on my opponent, rather than just his sword tip, or my dagger, or if my pace is right, etc.

In practice, all of those are important to focus on, but in the fight, its almost as if I have to rely on the robot to run those things, while I'm alert to the opponent and what they're up to.

Nice quote Telarus.

I find it's helpful to cultivate a "Thousand Yard Stare" when I'm at the swordplay.  Look at EVERYTHING at once, evenly, without focusing on any one point.  It's kind of like setting your eyes to pick up any motion, but not focus in directly on it.
This is effective both for seeing motions that a single pointed awareness would miss, as well as keeping your opponent from seeing where you're staring. 
To them it looks like you've "glazed over" or "gone away", which some find unsettling.
You can choose to stare at a unique part of them, (ex: leg), and then strike somewhere different. 


The "Thousand Yard Stare" seems a good metaphor for the technique.

This reminds me of a Ninjutsu technique that I taught to JohnnyBrainwash on the way down to the last Kallisticon. Basically, to prevent you from going "nightblind" you have to change how you are physically using your eyes at night. Most of the time (esp. in daylight) it's more economical to make very small movements with the head and to make much 'larger' movements with the eyes, so that the object of focus is in the center of your field of vision.

This works well because the center of the retina (the fovea) contains only Cones (color sensitivity). At night, this usually means things in the center of the visual feild become 'lost' or 'blacked out'. As there are less Rods(brightness sensitivity) near the center of the eye, and as those Rods can become fatigued from overuse (straining to make out details in the dark), the normal daytime way of looking at things becomes useless (and a liability in combat/sneakery).

The solution that the Ninjutsu schools came up with (and this was before they had a good idea of how the eye was structured, mind you), was to lock the gaze forward in the head (the "Thousand Yard Stare"), and then swing the head left and right to allow the peripheral Rods a greater chance to capture the faint reflected light.

This explanation will be worthless unless you actually try it at night.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/vision/retina.html (http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/vision/retina.html)
(http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/vision/imgvis/retina.gif)
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Honey on December 14, 2008, 03:42:55 pm
Zen of Sarcasm

1. Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me either. Just pretty much leave me alone.

2. The journey of a thousand miles begins with a broken fan belt and leaky tire.

3. It's always darkest before dawn. So if you're going to steal your neighbor’s newspaper, that’s the time to do it.

4. Don't be irreplaceable. If you can't be replaced, you can't be promoted.

5. Always remember that you're unique. Just like everyone else.

6. Never test the depth of the water with both feet.

7. If you think nobody cares if you're alive, try missing a couple of car payments.

8. Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

9. If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is probably not for you.

10. Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach him how to fish, and he will sit in a boat and drink beer all day.

11. If you lend someone $20 and never see that person again, it was probably a wise investment.

12. If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything.

13. Some days you're the bug; some days you're the windshield.

14. Everyone seems normal until you get to know them.

15. The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it back in your pocket.

16. A closed mouth gathers no foot.

17. Duct tape is like 'The Force.' It has a light side and a dark side, and it holds the universe together.

18. There are two theories to arguing with women. Neither one works.

19. Generally speaking, you aren't learning much when your lips are moving.

20. Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

21. Never miss a good chance to shut up.

22. Never, under any circumstances, take a sleeping pill and a laxative on the same night.

(Dunno who said these)

Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on December 15, 2008, 12:14:59 am
 :lulz: Thanks for adding to the thread, Honey!

Quote
When the wind blows through the scattered bamboos, they do not hold its sound after it has gone. When the wild geese fly over a cold lake, it does not retain their shadows after they have passed. So the mind of the superior person begins to work only when an event occurs; and it becomes a void again when the matter ends.

- Hung Ying-ming 1596

Speaks for itself, really.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: ternechto on December 15, 2008, 01:46:29 am
Quote
12. If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything.

This one seems kind of sage-ish.

Quote
8. Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

:lulz:
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Richter on December 16, 2008, 05:21:57 pm
SNIP'D

Very true. I find that focus in swordfighting is very different from focus in circuit building. If' I'm soldering something I'm focused on the wire, the solder, the iron tip and nothing else... If I focus like that in fencing, I die. In fancing, the focus is more like an alertness... the former seems like a tight beam flashlight, while the other seems like a broader spotlight on my opponent, rather than just his sword tip, or my dagger, or if my pace is right, etc.

In practice, all of those are important to focus on, but in the fight, its almost as if I have to rely on the robot to run those things, while I'm alert to the opponent and what they're up to.

Nice quote Telarus.

I find it's helpful to cultivate a "Thousand Yard Stare" when I'm at the swordplay.  Look at EVERYTHING at once, evenly, without focusing on any one point.  It's kind of like setting your eyes to pick up any motion, but not focus in directly on it.
This is effective both for seeing motions that a single pointed awareness would miss, as well as keeping your opponent from seeing where you're staring. 
To them it looks like you've "glazed over" or "gone away", which some find unsettling.
You can choose to stare at a unique part of them, (ex: leg), and then strike somewhere different. 


The "Thousand Yard Stare" seems a good metaphor for the technique.

This reminds me of a Ninjutsu technique that I taught to JohnnyBrainwash on the way down to the last Kallisticon. Basically, to prevent you from going "nightblind" you have to change how you are physically using your eyes at night. Most of the time (esp. in daylight) it's more economical to make very small movements with the head and to make much 'larger' movements with the eyes, so that the object of focus is in the center of your field of vision.

This works well because the center of the retina (the fovea) contains only Cones (color sensitivity). At night, this usually means things in the center of the visual feild become 'lost' or 'blacked out'. As there are less Rods(brightness sensitivity) near the center of the eye, and as those Rods can become fatigued from overuse (straining to make out details in the dark), the normal daytime way of looking at things becomes useless (and a liability in combat/sneakery).

The solution that the Ninjutsu schools came up with (and this was before they had a good idea of how the eye was structured, mind you), was to lock the gaze forward in the head (the "Thousand Yard Stare"), and then swing the head left and right to allow the peripheral Rods a greater chance to capture the faint reflected light.

This explanation will be worthless unless you actually try it at night.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/vision/retina.html (http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/vision/retina.html)
(http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/vision/imgvis/retina.gif)

Going beyond a technique of how to use your eyes, I should have also commented on the mental aspect of this.  It's more often described annecdotally, but first person accounts regard it as a state of "no mind" (mental processes only being receptive, not reflective, living in the moment).  One teacher of mine decribed an SCA match where he ceased caring how his opponent circled or approached him, there was only certainty that he would strike.

Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on December 16, 2008, 09:36:21 pm
Exactly Ritchter,

"When you cease trying to control and manipulate your experience, meditation spontaneously happens." -(The Impact of Awakening, pg 23)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adyashanti

Have you read the "What is Chi?" (http://www.principiadiscordia.com/forum/index.php?topic=18255.0) thread, we went over some no-mind theory in there.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on December 16, 2008, 09:54:08 pm
So given this, it makes a couple old masters moves make even more sense... specifically I'm thinking of the "Slope" and the "Compass" steps in fencing.

These both take the person out of the general range of a straight forward stare as discussed above.

If we imagine two fencers facing each other, right foot slightly forward, if you were standing on top of a clock, the right foot would be at 1 and the left at about 10 or 10:30.

A slope pace moves the right foot forward and angled away from the opponent. This places the fencer under the normal thrust and most of the attack takes place far to the left of the defender, almost outside the peripheral vision.

A compass step begins from the same position, with one foot acting as the point of the compass. The fencer pivots on either the right foot (placing him forward and to the left of the opponent) or the left foot (placing the attack forward and to the right of the opponent).

Both of these make use of at least two principles. First, they move the body out of the way of a direct thrust or cut. Second  they place the attack coming from a position several degress left or right of the opponent, where defence is traditionally weaker (to the side and under the sword arm, to the side and under the dagger/buckler arm). Now I wonder if placing the attacker at the edge of peripheral vision might be useful against a broad stare...
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: N E T on December 16, 2008, 11:48:03 pm

Quote
When the wind blows through the scattered bamboos, they do not hold its sound after it has gone. When the wild geese fly over a cold lake, it does not retain their shadows after they have passed. So the mind of the superior person begins to work only when an event occurs; and it becomes a void again when the matter ends.

- Hung Ying-ming 1596

Speaks for itself, really.

Because amnesiacs get along GREAT in life!

:roll:
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Brotep on December 17, 2008, 12:34:14 am
It is one kind of meditation to be focused on a single point until everything melts away, another to be alert but not focused on anything in particular.  The former is not so useful for swordplay, but both are worth exploring.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Richter on December 17, 2008, 01:57:05 pm
Exactly Ritchter,

"When you cease trying to control and manipulate your experience, meditation spontaneously happens." -(The Impact of Awakening, pg 23)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adyashanti

Have you read the "What is Chi?" (http://www.principiadiscordia.com/forum/index.php?topic=18255.0) thread, we went over some no-mind theory in there.

I'll try to avoid prev. covered points then, but I am enthusiastic about discussing the Meditation / Martial / Ritual / Psychological / Medical areas of crossover. :)  (Since these SEEM like only different frames of reference for describing the same overall effects.)

So given this, it makes a couple old masters moves make even more sense... specifically I'm thinking of the "Slope" and the "Compass" steps in fencing.

These both take the person out of the general range of a straight forward stare as discussed above.

If we imagine two fencers facing each other, right foot slightly forward, if you were standing on top of a clock, the right foot would be at 1 and the left at about 10 or 10:30.

A slope pace moves the right foot forward and angled away from the opponent. This places the fencer under the normal thrust and most of the attack takes place far to the left of the defender, almost outside the peripheral vision.

A compass step begins from the same position, with one foot acting as the point of the compass. The fencer pivots on either the right foot (placing him forward and to the left of the opponent) or the left foot (placing the attack forward and to the right of the opponent).

Both of these make use of at least two principles. First, they move the body out of the way of a direct thrust or cut. Second  they place the attack coming from a position several degress left or right of the opponent, where defence is traditionally weaker (to the side and under the sword arm, to the side and under the dagger/buckler arm). Now I wonder if placing the attacker at the edge of peripheral vision might be useful against a broad stare...

I do something similar in the heavy fighting with sword blows that are done at odd angles to the body / vision (Still requiring proper range and footwork to set up :wink: )  Both using unusual angles of attack and setting them up when you aren't directly facing an opponent (necessary for some), can really throw people.  (I was once told I "made a sword come out of nowhere" :oops:)


Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Richter on December 17, 2008, 01:58:23 pm
It is one kind of meditation to be focused on a single point until everything melts away, another to be alert but not focused on anything in particular.  The former is not so useful for swordplay, but both are worth exploring.

That all depends.  Your single point of awareness, does it have a size? 
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Brotep on December 17, 2008, 04:18:30 pm
No.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Richter on December 17, 2008, 04:35:38 pm
Then that single point can be whatever you need it to, as encompassing or specific as you want the point to be.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Brotep on December 17, 2008, 10:05:25 pm
I see your point

but am not talking about a spatial point

your senses are not sharper when they're obliterated
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Richter on December 17, 2008, 11:27:44 pm
Neither  am I. 
What you focus on can be as simple as a number, concept, sound, or a mote of dust, or as complex as an opponent, a whole field, or a nation, as complex as you want to can conceive.  It's all looking at it the same way. 
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on December 18, 2008, 01:34:52 am
The next person to reply had better quote some dead spag.  :argh!:
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Brotep on December 18, 2008, 02:00:53 am
^No.

^^What I'm talking about is a state in which--for example--pure sound is experienced, and the realization that it is one's own breathing comes as a shock.  This is not a helpful state for combat.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: the last yatto on December 18, 2008, 04:15:52 am
Quote
Winnie-the-Pooh is making a come back!! AND now we have a book on the philosophy of this most adorable bear, and his little friend, Piglet. All this in the series of books The Wisdom of Pooh. Actually, The Tao of Pooh was first publish in 1982, and The Te of Piglet in 1992. The books are Benjamin Hoff's explanations of the Eastern philosophy of Taoism and Te through the actions and thoughts of Pooh I'm-a-bear-of-very-little-brain-and-long-words-bother-me and Piglet  a Very Small Animal.
If you can stand the inane comments from Christopher Robin's friends: Winnie-the-Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, Tigger, Owl, Kanga and Roo, then this is a gentle book of humour with lots of cute B/W drawings of the abovementioned characters. Hoff narrates through conversations with Pooh and Co., with plenty of stories from the writings of Lao-Tse in Tao Te Ching, and from the writer Chuang-tse, intermingled with the adventures of these little cute things.
The Tao of Pooh - Contents :
 Foreword, The How of Pooh, The Tao of Who?, Spelling Tuesday, Cottleston Pie, The Pooh Way, Bisy Backson, That Sort of Bear, Nowhere and Nothing, The Now of Pooh, Backword.
The Te of Piglet - Contents :
 What? Another One?, Interjection, The - What Was That Again? - of Piglet, Very Small Animal, The Eeyore Effect, The Tigger Tendency, Things as They Might Be, Things As They Are, The Upright Heart, The Day of Piglet, Farewell.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Honey on December 21, 2008, 02:43:51 am
From Zen Flesh, Zen Bones:  A Collection of Zen & Pre-Zen Writings, compiled by Paul Reps:

The following is adapted from the preface to the 1st English-language edition of the book The Gateless Gate:

The teaching of the Buddha was spread in India 500 years prior to the time of Jesus & a thousand years before Mohammed.  Buddhism joined the current of great faiths of the world long before Christianity & Islam.

Buddhist scriptures were translated into Chinese by both Indian & Chinese translators, dynasty after dynasty, from the 1st century of the Christian era.  The essence of Buddhism, however, was carried from India to China in AD 520 by Bodhidharma, known as the 1st Zen patriarch.  The wisdom of enlightenment generated from the Buddha by the silent-sitting Bodhidharma was inherited by his successor, & similarly handed down through many generations.  It was thus that Zen entered, & was nurtured in, & spread thru China & eventually Japan.

The Japanese word zen – ch’an in Chinese, dhyana in Sanskrit – means meditation.  Zen aims, through meditation, to realize what Buddha himself realized, the emancipation of one’s mind.  It offers a method of self-searching, usually under the personal guidance of a master.

Zen has many classic texts, of which this work is one.  Mu-mon-kan – literally, “no gate barrier” – was recorded by the Chinese master Ekai, also called Mu-mon, who lived from 1183 to 1260.  The work consists of narrated relationships between Chinese teachers & their pupils, illustrating means employed to sublimate the dualistic, outgoing, generalizing, intellectualizing tendencies of students in order that they might realize their true nature.  The problems or inner challenges with which the masters confronted their pupils came to be called koans, & each of the following stories is a koan in itself.

The stories use slang freely to actualize the highest teaching, the seeing into one’s being.  Occasional instances of apparent violence might be better interpreted as vigor & earnestness.  None of the stories make any pretense at logic.**  They are dealing with states of mind rather than words.  Unless this is understood, the point of the classic will be missed.  The whole intent was to help the pupil break the shell of his limited mind & attain a 2nd eternal birth, satori, enlightenment.

Each problem is a barrier.  Those who have the spirit of Zen pass thru it.  Those who live in Zen understand one koan after another, each in his own way, as if they were seeing the unseen & living in the illimitable.

**If you like nearly flawless logic in these kinds of things, try George Carlin.

Mu-mon wrote the following words in his introduction to the work:

“Zen has no gates.  The purpose of Buddha’s words is to enlighten others.  Therefore Zen should be gateless.  Now, how does one pass thru this gateless gate?  Some say that whatever enters thru a gate is not family treasure, that whatever is produced by the help of another is likely to dissolve & perish.

Even such words are like raising waves in a windless sea or performing an operation upon a healthy body.  If one clings to what others have said & tries to understand Zen by explanation, he is like a dunce who thinks he can beat the moon with a pole or scratch an itching foot from the outside of a shoe.  It will be impossible after all.

In the year 1228 I was lecturing monks in the Ryusho temple in Eastern China, & at their request I retold old koans, endeavoring to inspire their Zen spirit.  I meant to use the koans as a man who picks up a piece of brick to knock at a gate, & after the gate is opened, the brick is useless & is thrown away.  My notes, however, were collected unexpectedly, & there were 48 koans, together with my comment in prose & verse concerning each, although their arrangement was not in the order of the telling.  I have called the book The Gateless Gate, wishing students to read it as a guide.

If the reader is brave enough & goes straight forward in his meditation, no delusions can disturb him.  He will become enlightened just as did the patriarchs in India & in China, probably even better.  But if he hesitates one moment, he is as a person watching from a small window for a horseman to pass by, & in a wink he has missed seeing."

”The great path has no gates,
Thousands of roads enter it,
When one passes thru this gateless gate
He walks freely between heaven & earth.”



18.  Tozan’s Three Pounds

A monk asked Tozan when he was weighing some flax:  “What is Buddha?”
Tozan said:  “This flax weighs three pounds.”

Mummon’s comment:  Old Tozan’s Zen is like a clam.  The minute the shell opens you see the whole inside.  However, I want to ask you:  Do you see the real Tozan?

Three pounds of flax in front of your nose,
Close enough, & mind is still closer.
Whoever talks about affirmation & negation
Lives in the right & wrong region


19.  Everyday Life is the Path

Joshu asked Nansen:  “What is the path?”
Nansen said:  “Everyday life is the path.”
Joshu asked:  “Can it be studied?”
Nansen said:  “If you try to study, you will be far away from it.”
Joshu asked:  "If I do not study, how can I know it is the path?”
Nansen said:  “The path does not belong to the perception world, neither does it belong to the nonperception world.  Cognition is a delusion & noncognition is senseless.  If you want to reach the true path beyond doubt, place yourself in the same freedom as sky.  You name it neither good nor not-good."
At these words, Joshu was enlightened.


39.  Ummon’s Sidetrack: 

A Zen student told Ummon:  “Brilliancy of Buddha illuminates the whole universe.”
Before he finished the phrase Ummon asked:  “You are reciting another’s poem, are you not?
“Yes,” answered the student.
“You are sidetracked,” said Ummon.
Afterwards another teacher, Shishin, asked his pupils:  “At what point did that student go off the track?”
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on December 21, 2008, 03:21:37 am
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Honey on December 24, 2008, 01:33:01 am
Hey & that’s 1 of my favorites too!  Walked out of a *bullshit* meeting at work with a notebook on my head after someone threw out a bullshit *challenge*.  Nobody said a word, don't even think they noticed.

& this stuff is like music to me.  Sometimes I’m in the mood for this or that.  I pretty much always like the zen stories tho.  & it’s a waaay welcome relief from the Judaic/Islamic/Xtian bullshit.  Equally tiresome (& predictable) is the fundamental or evangelical Atheists.  Both sides ended up sounding (to me) like apologists, so much sophistry, both obsessed with that same friggin' book.  I guess it’s more of a reactive thing.  Works for some.
 
The zen stories remind me it’s all bullshit!  (I like that part)   :)   Gets me to thinking 'bout what a color might taste like?  Or surfing a wave of sound or anyway something of that sort.  Or thinking about time (again).

Quote
From THE DEVIL'S DICTIONARY ((C)1911 Released April 15 1993) :

SOPHISTRY, n.  The controversial method of an opponent, distinguished from one's own by superior insincerity and fooling.  This method is that of the later Sophists, a Grecian sect of philosophers who began by teaching wisdom, prudence, science, art and, in brief, whatever men ought to know, but lost themselves in a maze of quibbles and a fog of words.
 
      His bad opponent's "facts" he sweeps away,
      And drags his sophistry to light of day;
      Then swears they're pushed to madness who resort
      To falsehood of so desperate a sort.
      Not so; like sods upon a dead man's breast,
      He lies most lightly who the least is pressed.

- Polydore Smith

http://www.dict.org/bin/Dict
 
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: drjon on January 08, 2009, 07:44:47 am
*sniffsniff*

Why does it stink of Zen in here? Who's been fapping?

/leaves
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Honey on January 10, 2009, 04:53:07 am
*arriving*

*sniffsniff*

Why does it stink of Zen in here? Who's been fapping?

/leaves

 :lulz:

I just love the smell of napalm in the morning.

goin’ surfing now & byeee!

*leaving*
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Kai on January 10, 2009, 09:49:23 am
WHY WAS I NOT MADE AWARE OF THIS THREAD AND ITS CONTENTS?

*couples with CHI thread for great justice*
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on March 06, 2009, 04:06:01 am
Whether you are an innocent beginner or seasoned adept, you must show some spirit! Don't vainly memorize other people's sayings: a little bit of reality is better than a lot of illusion. Otherwise you'll just go on deceiving yourself.

- Yunmen (864-949)
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Honey on March 07, 2009, 02:27:56 pm
A Straight Dope Classic from Cecil's Storehouse of Human Knowledge

What is the sound of one hand clapping?

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/43/what-is-the-sound-of-one-hand-clapping
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on March 08, 2009, 08:17:58 pm
The worthies of old all had
means of emancipating people.
What I teach people just requires
you not to take on the confusion of others.
If you need to act, then act,
without any further hesitation or doubt.

- Lin Chi (d 867?)
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Tempest Virago on March 08, 2009, 11:19:20 pm
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!

I don't get it. At all. I think I'm too stupid for Zen. :(
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on March 09, 2009, 12:39:27 am
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!

I don't get it. At all. I think I'm too stupid for Zen. :(

Zen is bullshit.  Pseudo-mystical pinealist garbage.

Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: N E T on March 09, 2009, 01:06:13 am
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!

I don't get it. At all. I think I'm too stupid for Zen. :(

Zen is bullshit.  Pseudo-mystical pinealist garbage.



You're quite adept at it.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on March 09, 2009, 01:14:10 am
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!

I don't get it. At all. I think I'm too stupid for Zen. :(

Zen is bullshit.  Pseudo-mystical pinealist garbage.



You're quite adept at it.

Thank you for your opinion.

Now eat a dick.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: N E T on March 09, 2009, 01:16:55 am
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!

I don't get it. At all. I think I'm too stupid for Zen. :(

Zen is bullshit.  Pseudo-mystical pinealist garbage.



You're quite adept at it.

Thank you for your opinion.

Now eat a dick.

First tell me what REAL mysticism is and I'll get right on that penis-chewing.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on March 09, 2009, 01:23:49 am
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!

I don't get it. At all. I think I'm too stupid for Zen. :(

The essence of Zen lies in spontaneity, in 'pure action/being' not wrapped up in, debated with, hesitated about, or fantasized over ...using LANGUAGE and ABSTRACTION.

When Nansen confiscates the cat and threatens to kill it unless one of the monk can "say a word of Zen" he was challenging them to drop the Verbal Argument that they were having with each other.

SAYing a word of Zen is literally impossible. Nansen is demanding that the monks drop the negative linguistic karma/emotions that had them fighting with each other. They cannot, and the cat dies.

When Joshu hears this story, his reaction shows that he is a Zen Master. This is because, as a Zen Master.. any simple, spontaneous action that Joshu takes that does not copy another or get hesitated over and abstracted is a Word/Act of Zen. Also, Joshu is making a commentary on Nansen's actions. Something along the lines of "Killing that cat was as constructive as wearing my shoes on my head."

Finally, Mumon comments (quite correctly, IMO) that if Joshu had been there to see the cat threatened, he would have "Said a Word of Zen" by snatching Nansen's blade and placing Nansen in the same arbitrary conundrum that Nansen places the cat and 2 monks in.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on March 09, 2009, 01:26:16 am
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!

I don't get it. At all. I think I'm too stupid for Zen. :(

Zen is bullshit.  Pseudo-mystical pinealist garbage.



You're quite adept at it.

Thank you for your opinion.

Now eat a dick.

First tell me what REAL mysticism is and I'll get right on that penis-chewing.

Naw.  After your little sniping fit, I'm far more interested in just brawling with you for the next 3 or 4 months.   :)
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: N E T on March 09, 2009, 01:27:32 am
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!

I don't get it. At all. I think I'm too stupid for Zen. :(

Zen is bullshit.  Pseudo-mystical pinealist garbage.



You're quite adept at it.

Thank you for your opinion.

Now eat a dick.

First tell me what REAL mysticism is and I'll get right on that penis-chewing.

Naw.  After your little sniping fit, I'm far more interested in just brawling with you for the next 3 or 4 months.   :)

Good luck with that.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on March 09, 2009, 01:30:03 am
Good luck with that.

Yes, yes.  Fuck off, asshole.

Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Tempest Virago on March 09, 2009, 09:38:07 pm
Thanks for continuing the thread, Honey.

Mu-Mon-Kan # 14
Quote
Nansen Cuts the Cat in Two

    Nansen saw the monks of the eastern and western halls fighting over a cat. He seized the cat and told the monks: `If any of you say a word of Zen, you can save the cat.'

    No one answered. So Nansen boldly cut the cat in two pieces.

    That evening Joshu returned and Nansen told him about this. Joshu removed his sandals and, placing them on his head, walked out.

    Nansen said: `If you had been there, you could have saved the cat.'

Mumon's Comment: Why did Joshu put his sandals on his head? If anyone answers this question, he will understand exactly how Nansen enforced the edict. If not, he should watch his own head.

    Had Joshu been there,
    He would have enforced the edict oppositely.
    Joshu snatches the sword
    And Nansen begs for his life.


Does anyone need further commentary on this?

Also  :lulz: Put Shoe on Head!

I don't get it. At all. I think I'm too stupid for Zen. :(

The essence of Zen lies in spontaneity, in 'pure action/being' not wrapped up in, debated with, hesitated about, or fantasized over ...using LANGUAGE and ABSTRACTION.

When Nansen confiscates the cat and threatens to kill it unless one of the monk can "say a word of Zen" he was challenging them to drop the Verbal Argument that they were having with each other.

SAYing a word of Zen is literally impossible. Nansen is demanding that the monks drop the negative linguistic karma/emotions that had them fighting with each other. They cannot, and the cat dies.

When Joshu hears this story, his reaction shows that he is a Zen Master. This is because, as a Zen Master.. any simple, spontaneous action that Joshu takes that does not copy another or get hesitated over and abstracted is a Word/Act of Zen. Also, Joshu is making a commentary on Nansen's actions. Something along the lines of "Killing that cat was as constructive as wearing my shoes on my head."

Finally, Mumon comments (quite correctly, IMO) that if Joshu had been there to see the cat threatened, he would have "Said a Word of Zen" by snatching Nansen's blade and placing Nansen in the same arbitrary conundrum that Nansen places the cat and 2 monks in.

Okay, that makes sense. I'm not sure whether or not I like it, but at least I get it now.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on March 11, 2009, 09:17:16 pm
The Great Person from time past
Had no fixed abode,
In famed mountains his traces hid,
As they grew old amid wind and frost.

From afar, I know your
White-rock hermitage,
Hidden in a haze
Of evergreen trees.

When the moon sets,
Mind-watching passes time;
Clouds arise
In your closed eyes.

Just before dawn, temple bells
Sound from neighboring peaks;
Waterfalls hang
thousands of feet
In emptiness.

Moss and lichen
Cover the cliff face;
A narrow, indistinct path
Leads to you.

- Chia Tao (779-843)

-=This is also going in the 'Define God' thread.=-
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Idiot on March 14, 2009, 11:48:47 am
This reply doesn't involve thinking about anything other than thinking about not thinking about not thinking about anything else apart from thinking about this reply.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: drjon on March 30, 2009, 10:04:06 am
Urgh! X{P> The Stench of Zen!
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on September 28, 2009, 10:54:33 pm
Inre:  The OP.

I find that, in a swordfight, I am concentrating entirely on drawing a pistol.

Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on September 28, 2009, 10:56:38 pm
Also, a Koan:

A filthy apprentice approached the Maintenance Manager and asked, "what is the essence of maintenance?"  The Maintenance Manager responded by firing the dumbshit, for asking philosophical questions instead of oiling the machines.

Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on September 28, 2009, 11:08:25 pm
Inre:  The OP.

I find that, in a swordfight, I am concentrating entirely on drawing a pistol.


:lulz:
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Kai on September 29, 2009, 03:02:34 am
Also, a Koan:

A filthy apprentice approached the Maintenance Manager and asked, "what is the essence of maintenance?"  The Maintenance Manager responded by firing the dumbshit, for asking philosophical questions instead of oiling the machines.



Fuckin deeeeeep, man.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on September 29, 2009, 04:31:34 am
Also, a Koan:

A filthy apprentice approached the Maintenance Manager and asked, "what is the essence of maintenance?"  The Maintenance Manager responded by firing the dumbshit, for asking philosophical questions instead of oiling the machines.



Fuckin deeeeeep, man.

A walk in the ocean of my soul would scarcely get your toes damp.

And those machines ain't gonna oil themselves.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Halfbaked1 on September 29, 2009, 04:58:05 am
I learned alot of my concepts of Zen from reading the Tao of Jeet Kune Do.  It wasn't until later that I read Musashi.  But I think my best summation of my search for Zen in my life is best said as...

I spent years searching for the understanding of Zen before I sat down and closed my eyes.

I don't seem so interested in understanding it now, so much as I simply enjoy the moments of Zen that happen in my life.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on September 29, 2009, 05:16:10 am
I learned alot of my concepts of Zen from reading the Tao of Jeet Kune Do.  It wasn't until later that I read Musashi.  But I think my best summation of my search for Zen in my life is best said as...

I spent years searching for the understanding of Zen before I sat down and closed my eyes.

I don't seem so interested in understanding it now, so much as I simply enjoy the moments of Zen that happen in my life.

Zen is shit.  Absolute rubbish.  Brain-fapping.  A prank played on gullible roundeyes by Discordian Asians with nothing better to do with their time.  Peddlers of this swill should be defenestrated, long before they breed.  Really, enough is enough.  It's practicing to make yourself a bliss ninny.

Just saying.

TGRR,
Will make an exception for that Zazzen shit, but only if *I* get to have the stick.  And a clear shot at your fenestrates.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Cramulus on September 29, 2009, 03:09:15 pm
sez you
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on September 29, 2009, 03:17:23 pm
sez you

But I would totally do that Zazzen shit.  What a racket!
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Mesozoic Mister Nigel on September 29, 2009, 07:58:12 pm
I don't even know what Zazzen is.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: LMNO on September 29, 2009, 08:00:16 pm
You pretend to be a holy person, and if anyone asks you a question, you smack them in the head with a stick.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Cramulus on September 29, 2009, 08:01:45 pm
zazen refers to how you sit while meditating

though I think Roger is referring to the part where you're deep in meditation, and the leader sneaks up behind you and CRACKS YOU WITH A CANE, thereby totally short circuiting your consciousness


Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on September 29, 2009, 08:08:23 pm
zazen refers to how you sit while meditating

though I think Roger is referring to the part where you're deep in meditation, and the leader sneaks up behind you and CRACKS YOU WITH A CANE, thereby totally short circuiting your consciousness




Yeah, that part.  Or when you're sleeping.  Or pooping.  Or driving.  I'm not picky.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on September 29, 2009, 08:09:24 pm
You pretend to be a holy person, and if anyone asks you a question, you smack them in the head with a stick.

Wait.  I'm supposed to wait for them to ask a question?

:(

Doin' it wrong.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: fomenter on September 29, 2009, 08:23:02 pm
i think the smacks with a stick are mostly to keep those siting in meditation from falling asleep, day dreaming, or slouching into a comfortable position while doing the serious work of becoming a bliss ninny
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Mesozoic Mister Nigel on September 29, 2009, 08:25:09 pm
zazen refers to how you sit while meditating

though I think Roger is referring to the part where you're deep in meditation, and the leader sneaks up behind you and CRACKS YOU WITH A CANE, thereby totally short circuiting your consciousness




What the hell.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on September 29, 2009, 08:30:16 pm
zazen refers to how you sit while meditating

though I think Roger is referring to the part where you're deep in meditation, and the leader sneaks up behind you and CRACKS YOU WITH A CANE, thereby totally short circuiting your consciousness




What the hell.

That religion was MADE FOR ME!  Only I don't want to meditate.  I get my enlightenment from sex, religious substances, and pissing off my coworkers.  And hitting people with sticks while they contemplate their navels.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on September 29, 2009, 08:30:59 pm
i think the smacks with a stick are mostly to keep those siting in meditation from falling asleep, day dreaming, or slouching into a comfortable position while doing the serious work of becoming a bliss ninny

WRONG.  The smacks with a stick are because they've been bad little monks and they need to be punished.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on September 29, 2009, 08:42:01 pm
 :lulz:
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Kai on October 04, 2009, 09:20:26 pm
Zazen is sitting.


I sit all the time.


Kai,

Likes to sit.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on October 05, 2009, 12:10:44 am
Zazen is sitting.


 :sad:
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Golden Applesauce on October 05, 2009, 01:18:20 am
Sit softly, and carry a big stick.
--Zen Master Roosevelt
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on October 05, 2009, 02:37:58 am
Sit softly, and carry a big stick.
--Zen Master Roosevelt

"Stomp and rant and puke, and hit a motherfucker in the nads.  IN THA NADS!"
- TGRR, The Book of Meditations.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: on October 05, 2009, 10:54:55 am
This reminds me of the void chapter of Go-Rin-No-Sho
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Triple Zero on October 05, 2009, 12:19:46 pm
Zazen is sitting.


 :sad:

EXTREME sitting.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: LMNO on October 05, 2009, 12:37:38 pm
Zazen is shitting.


I shit all the time.


Kai,

Likes to shit.

Zazen is shitting.


 :sad:

EXTREME shitting.

Fixed for TGRR accuracy.
Title: Re: Zenarchist Swordsmen
Post by: Telarus on January 20, 2012, 04:38:56 am
What does discordia mean to me?  what does discordia mean to ME?? I'll TELL you what discordia means to me!

It means......

Halp, Halp, probability waves are collapsing all around me!!!!

Waves are not measured in feet and inches, they are measured in increments of fear.
-Buzzy Trent.

Don't seek, don't search, don't ask, don't knock, don't demand - relax. If you relax, it comes. If you relax, it is there. If you relax, you start vibrating[moving] with it.
-Osho

One of the greatest things about the sport of surfing is that you need only three things: your body, a surf-board, and a wave.
-Naima Green

Calm in quietude is not real calm. When you can be calm in the midst of activity, this is the true state of nature. Happiness in comfort is not real happiness. When you can be happy in the midst of hardship, then you see the true potential of the mind.
-Huanchu Daoren

Some people may become overly reliant on the program and its people and meetings. This type of rigid participation enables people to avoid addressing the pain and issues that lie beneath the addiction. Surf now, apocalypse later.
-Beachside graffiti in California.

The master in the art of living makes little distinction between his work and his play, his labor and his leisure, his mind and his body, his information and his recreation, his love and his religion. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence at whatever he does, leaving others to decide whether he is working or playing. To him he is always doing both.
-Zen Wisdom

Surfing expresses ... a pure yearning for visceral, physical contact with the natural world.
-Matt Warshaw

The feminine is more powerful than the masculine, the soft is more powerful than the hard, the water is more powerful than the rock.
-Osho


Also:
http://hardcorezen.blogspot.com/2012/01/george-harrison-says-we-are-not-these.html