Principia Discordia

Principia Discordia => Apple Talk => Topic started by: notathing on May 30, 2012, 06:35:37 am

Title: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: notathing on May 30, 2012, 06:35:37 am
so is it just me or has everyone felt this?:

Quote from: http://www.asmr-research.org/
Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a physical sensation characterized by a pleasurable tingling that typically begins in the head and scalp, and often moves down the spine and through the limbs.

Most ASMR episodes begin by an external or internal trigger...

some of these various triggers are enumerated in this article (http://anti-valentine.hubpages.com/hub/ASMR), including:


some people reportedly experience type A episodes, that is, experiences which seem to be induced by an individual's thought processes rather than external stimuli. (it is interesting to note that this category of ASMR experiences in particular have some commonality with certain types of mystical experiences.)

however, ASMR has been the subject of little research. it appears to have only recently become a subject of somewhat widespread discussion, largely due to internet communication (by the way, it's quite interesting to video search ASMR triggers).

thoughts?
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Elder Iptuous on May 30, 2012, 06:42:57 am
sounds like what happens every time i piss...
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on May 30, 2012, 07:04:40 am
The article is way too vague in describing the sensation. I'm sure everyone has had a happy, tingling sensation at some point, but I don't think that's the limit of what the article is attempting to describe. None of the triggers ring a bell for me.

That said,
I can induce a feeling by what I would call
intense spacing-out
which I have a hunch is what they're describing.
But that's completely at will. Is the sensation you're thinking of induced at will, or is it more dependent on the object of attention?
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: AFK on May 30, 2012, 11:57:00 am
sounds like what happens everytime I pun.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: P3nT4gR4m on May 30, 2012, 12:40:30 pm
sounds like what happens everytime I pun.

I'm pretty sure he's not describing the kind of tingle that I feel when repeatedly smacking my head into the desk as hard as I can.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: AFK on May 30, 2012, 01:02:08 pm
I think that's where my tingle comes from.   >:D
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on May 30, 2012, 01:35:10 pm
I've had similar feelings when I was doing intense-spacing out/meditation as well. As for outside stimuli, if someone is drawing on me or playing with my hair it sometimes happens... never got it from sound or just watching someone doing something though.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Bu☆ns on May 31, 2012, 12:09:24 am
I would get it from watching Bob Ross paint.  Also I can make the sensation happen at will and even direct it through different parts of my body.  yes even that part.

Until we chatted about this in IRC, however, I just assumed everyone could do this and it happened to everyone.  You know, just nerves releasing endorphins.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Tiddleywomp Cockletit on May 31, 2012, 12:37:00 am
I only ever got that from the usual sources - sex, drugs & rock n roll.  :lulz: Music seems to set it off the most, though.  :?
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on May 31, 2012, 02:13:31 am
I would get it from watching Bob Ross paint.

This is possibly the strangest and most delightful non-erotic* fanfic idea.


* iffy.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Bu☆ns on May 31, 2012, 02:48:11 am
I would get it from watching Bob Ross paint.

This is possibly the strangest and most delightful non-erotic* fanfic idea.


* iffy.

http://i.imgur.com/VigY2.png ... nsfw
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Tiddleywomp Cockletit on May 31, 2012, 03:38:08 am
 :lulz: :lulz: :lulz:
That totally should've happened.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Bu☆ns on May 31, 2012, 04:03:30 am
"Over here we can use a knife to make a happy little fistula..."
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Telarus on May 31, 2012, 04:51:03 am
I would get it from watching Bob Ross paint.  Also I can make the sensation happen at will and even direct it through different parts of my body.  yes even that part.

Until we chatted about this in IRC, however, I just assumed everyone could do this and it happened to everyone.  You know, just nerves releasing endorphins.

Interesting, I've experienced similar, often while meditating. Haven't ran in to this slice of the descriptions used. I'll try to cross reference this with some of the tantra and pranayama bits I was practicing from. These were techniques for moving a 'point-consciousness' or point-of-attention throughout the body.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Bu☆ns on May 31, 2012, 04:57:53 am
I would get it from watching Bob Ross paint.  Also I can make the sensation happen at will and even direct it through different parts of my body.  yes even that part.

Until we chatted about this in IRC, however, I just assumed everyone could do this and it happened to everyone.  You know, just nerves releasing endorphins.

Interesting, I've experienced similar, often while meditating. Haven't ran in to this slice of the descriptions used. I'll try to cross reference this with some of the tantra and pranayama bits I was practicing from. These were techniques for moving a 'point-consciousness' or point-of-attention throughout the body.

Please do, Tel...I'm now very curious.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Mesozoic Mister Nigel on May 31, 2012, 05:38:51 am
I totally know that feeling. I like it. 
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on May 31, 2012, 05:50:37 am
Please do, Tel...

(http://i49.tinypic.com/25gw2mp.png)
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: tyrannosaurus vex on May 31, 2012, 06:48:43 am
I hate that there's a term for this, and that it doesn't just happen to me.

Does this century have to take the mystery out of everything?
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Don Coyote on May 31, 2012, 06:59:36 am
I hate that there's a term for this, and that it doesn't just happen to me.

Does this century have to take the mystery out of everything?

Magnets.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: notathing on May 31, 2012, 07:21:34 am
The article is way too vague in describing the sensation. I'm sure everyone has had a happy, tingling sensation at some point, but I don't think that's the limit of what the article is attempting to describe. None of the triggers ring a bell for me.

That said,
I can induce a feeling by what I would call
intense spacing-out
which I have a hunch is what they're describing.
But that's completely at will. Is the sensation you're thinking of induced at will, or is it more dependent on the object of attention?

the article is kind of vague... but the feeling, if I understand correctly, is sort of unable to adequately be described *shrug*

the sensation described by the article can reportedly be induced at will by some people but generally occurs as response to external stimuli.

personally, I haven't been able to induce it at will. I do experience it frequently though--usually in response to music (especially when I fuck with the pitch control on a record player).

I only ever got that from the usual sources - sex, drugs & rock n roll.  :lulz: Music seems to set it off the most, though.  :?

hehe, same here...  :p

I would get it from watching Bob Ross paint.  Also I can make the sensation happen at will and even direct it through different parts of my body.  yes even that part.

Until we chatted about this in IRC, however, I just assumed everyone could do this and it happened to everyone.  You know, just nerves releasing endorphins.

interesting burns... i can't help but think there may be some relationship between ASMR and experience with meditation and concentration.
speaking of which, Tel has piqued my curiousity as well. please report back!

i also assumed it happens to everyone.. apparently not :? I wonder if some people are incapable of experiencing it, or if something impedes them from doing so.

endorphins may be involved, but the mechanism of action is still unknown.

there ya go vex: some mysteries remain!
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on May 31, 2012, 07:24:12 am
the feeling, if I understand correctly, is sort of unable to adequately be described

...in English.

Funny how the limit of our mutual understanding is the limit of our language.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: notathing on May 31, 2012, 07:35:17 am
the feeling, if I understand correctly, is sort of unable to adequately be described

...in English.

Funny how the limit of our mutual understanding is the limit of our language.

i'm not sure i'd consider the limitation to be necessarily related to our language. language seems to be kind of a crude tool in general for conveying one's understanding of their perceptions to others.

i mean, no matter who is providing a description, that which is perceived still remains ultimately foreign to the listener, even if the listener has had a similar experience.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on May 31, 2012, 07:39:31 am
the feeling, if I understand correctly, is sort of unable to adequately be described

...in English.

Funny how the limit of our mutual understanding is the limit of our language.

i'm not sure i'd consider the limitation to be necessarily related to our language. language seems to be kind of a crude tool in general for conveying one's understanding of their perceptions to others.

Yeah, that's my point.

Quote
i mean, no matter who is providing a description, that which is perceived still remains ultimately foreign to the listener, even if the listener has had a similar experience.

Why do you talk at all, then?
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Tiddleywomp Cockletit on May 31, 2012, 07:40:25 am
I think we had a whole thread about that awhile back, how just because people don't have a word handy for something doesn't mean they don't have the concept.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: notathing on May 31, 2012, 07:44:06 am

Yeah, that's my point.

oh, I thought you were making an argument about the particular language of English, rather than about language in general. carry on.


Why do you talk at all, then?

sometimes I'm not sure.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on May 31, 2012, 07:53:01 am

Why do you talk at all, then?

sometimes I'm not sure.

Language approximates, man. That's it's job. Luckily, language also features the statements "I understand" and "I don't understand." As long as two people are confident that they have cleared up a concept and understand each other, why would you assume they really don't?
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: notathing on May 31, 2012, 08:41:32 am

Why do you talk at all, then?

sometimes I'm not sure.

Language approximates, man.

i'd agree with you there.


That's it's job. Luckily, language also features the statements "I understand" and "I don't understand." As long as two people are confident that they have cleared up a concept and understand each other, why would you assume they really don't?

belief that one has properly decoded the message conveyed doesn't necessarily entail that the message was received as intended. communication noise (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communication_noise) seems to be a frequent obstacle even in the most commonplace conversations.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on May 31, 2012, 09:39:52 am
Language approximates, man.

i'd agree with you there.


That's it's job. Luckily, language also features the statements "I understand" and "I don't understand." As long as two people are confident that they have cleared up a concept and understand each other, why would you assume they really don't?

belief that one has properly decoded the message conveyed doesn't necessarily entail that the message was received as intended. communication noise (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communication_noise) seems to be a frequent obstacle even in the most commonplace conversations.

Ideally, the conversation won't end with a single one-way transmission. There will be back-and-forth clarifications which would take care of any noise. No, that ideal doesn't always happen. The point is to get as close as you can.

Regardless of your explicit hopelessness about communication, you're still trying to communicate with me, in the belief that we can reach mutual understanding. I hope you realize that.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Bu☆ns on May 31, 2012, 09:57:01 pm
Please do, Tel...

(http://i49.tinypic.com/25gw2mp.png)

You liked that?
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on June 01, 2012, 06:08:03 am
Please do, Tel...

(http://i49.tinypic.com/25gw2mp.png)

You liked that?

Not sure. If you find out, please do tell.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: notathing on June 01, 2012, 06:20:20 am
I think we had a whole thread about that awhile back, how just because people don't have a word handy for something doesn't mean they don't have the concept.

i always like the way the germans have approached this problem.

Rinderkennzeichnungs- und Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: notathing on June 01, 2012, 06:33:52 am
That's it's job. Luckily, language also features the statements "I understand" and "I don't understand." As long as two people are confident that they have cleared up a concept and understand each other, why would you assume they really don't? Ideally, the conversation won't end with a single one-way transmission. There will be back-and-forth clarifications which would take care of any noise. No, that ideal doesn't always happen. The point is to get as close as you can.

you bring up some good points, especially in saying that conversation isn't a one way signal.  I can concede that language can allow enough communication to allow accord on some matters. I guess my point was that semantic noise still manages to creep in and can influence interpersonal communication in subtle and perhaps significant ways.



Regardless of your explicit hopelessness about communication, you're still trying to communicate with me, in the belief that we can reach mutual understanding. I hope you realize that.

I don't think that there is necessarily dissonance with my position and the fact that I am utilizing a form of communication with others. I think we can achieve a degree of mutual understanding.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on June 01, 2012, 06:50:35 am
That's it's job. Luckily, language also features the statements "I understand" and "I don't understand." As long as two people are confident that they have cleared up a concept and understand each other, why would you assume they really don't? Ideally, the conversation won't end with a single one-way transmission. There will be back-and-forth clarifications which would take care of any noise. No, that ideal doesn't always happen. The point is to get as close as you can.

you bring up some good points, especially in saying that conversation isn't a one way signal.  I can concede that language can allow enough communication to allow accord on some matters. I guess my point was that semantic noise still manages to creep in and can influence interpersonal communication in subtle and perhaps significant ways.
Absolutely. Imperfection's what we get for being mere fleshy mortals  :cry:

Quote
I don't think that there is necessarily dissonance with my position and the fact that I am utilizing a form of communication with others. I think we can achieve a degree of mutual understanding.

Okay, cool. I guess I misunderstood your point.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Xicked on June 01, 2012, 07:07:21 am
I think it has something to do with the body releasing tension (whatever 'tension' is).  I get that feeling whenever I get a good massage, and have had people describe the same feeling when I massage them.  Some of the triggers mentioned in the article are interesting... someone digging through a handbag?  I guess anything that a person associates as being 'soothing' might induce that feeling.  Maybe we all have mental 'tension blocks' that can be released by various images or stimuli. 
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Telarus on June 01, 2012, 11:57:14 am
I agree that it has to do with muscle tension, and thus plugs into (weirdely) Reichian muscle-armor/orgone/'subtle-energy'.

The quick notes follow(I have many tabs open). I will attempt to synthesize this information later today or tomorrow, or sometime.

Mirror Neurons (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/body/mirror-neurons.html) (the trigger of watching others focusing intently on a task, awareness is drawn to the muscle cortex because the mirror neurons queue up the signals necessary to do the same)

Pranayama / Breath Control (placing your awareness on your muscle cortex by following your breath while using meditative techniques to clear other sense data from your mind relatively quickly)

Most other triggers on the ASMR sites pull awareness (where we focus our attention) from where it normally rests, our sight/center-of-vision-focal-area, sometimes it seems, through the above secondary triggers.

Having practiced a few Zanshin techniques, I can say that this pull away from the center-of-visual-field changes the way visual information is sent to the brain, placing focus on spatial relationships over form/detail (by tracking multiple points in the focal and peripheral visions). This seems to queue up spatial relationship information in the body via the kinesthetic sense (Proprioception+Balance, look it up).

The word "Prana" in pranayama comes from the "Upper vortex" or Prana-Vayu
Quote
– located in the head and centred at the point of the ajna chakra (third eye) this is known as the inward moving wind as it governs all receptive activities including inhalation, sensory stimulation and mental recognition. This energy also pervades the thoracic region and is the fundamental force feeding the other vayus.

Which is roughly analogous to the "Upper Dan Tien" in WingChun/Qigong. Both systems say that the human body habitually falls "out of balance", and when this happens the 'subtle energy' from the upper energy point cannot fully enter the lower before getting cycled back out. In these systems, these feelings always have "flow-directions" (something Richard Bandler took advantage of with some of his NLP tricks, more on that later on when I collect my thought on all of this).  Also, many of these systems claim that moving the focus of attention from our forehead/visual field to lower in the body is supposed to have noticeable results in the rest of our day-to-day lives.

In these systems, we find descriptors like this:
Quote
When the prana is concentrated in the anahata chakra (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anahata) (the "green" heart/lung chakra), the seat of the gaseous or "air element," a variety of changes can happen: spontaneous rapid breathing or trembling, called kampa; or blocking of the voice so that one cannot speak and only hoarse sounds come out (svarbanga); or pulaka, when the hairs on the scalp prickle or stand up, goosebumps arise on the skin, and there is a feeling of joy in the heart.

The practive of "moving the attention willfully" is calles Sati in Thai Theravada Buddhism (http://www.thebigview.com/buddhism/meditation.html).
Quote
Use a posture that will keep your back straight without strain. A simple upright chair may be helpful, or you may be able to use the lotus posture. These postures may look awkward at first, but in time they can provide a unique balance of gentle firmness that gladdens the mind without tiring the body.

If the chin is tilted very slightly down this will help but do not allow the head to loll forward as this encourages drowsiness. Place the hands on your lap, palm upwards, one gently resting on the other with the thumb-tips touching. Take your time and get the right balance.

Now, collect your attention, and begin to move it slowly down your body. Notice the sensations in each part of your body. Relax any tensions, particularly in the face, neck and hands. Allow the eyelids to close or half close.

Investigate how you are feeling. Are you expectant or tense? Then relax your attention a little. With this, the mind will probably calm down and you may find some thoughts drifting in - reflections, daydreams, memories, or doubts about whether you are doing it right! Instead of following or contending with these thought patterns, bring more attention to the body, which is a useful anchor for a wandering mind.

Cultivate a spirit of inquiry in your meditation attitude. Take your time. Move your attention, for example, systematically from the crown of the head down over the whole body. Notice the different sensations - such as warmth, pulsing, numbness, and sensitivity - in the joints of each finger, the moisture of the palms, and the pulse in the wrist. Even areas that may have no particular sensation, such as the forearms or the earlobes can be "swept over" in an attentive way. Notice how even the lack of sensation is something the mind can be aware of. This constant and sustained investigation is called mindfulness (sati) and is one of the primary tools of Insight Meditation.

I lost a lot of my meditation bookmarks when an online bookmarking site I used went under, so I'm still finding stuff. Oh, I have PDFs on my computer from an old hard-drive where I found some, too. I'll look those up.

More later.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Triple Zero on June 01, 2012, 02:08:24 pm
I would get it from watching Bob Ross paint.  Also I can make the sensation happen at will and even direct it through different parts of my body.  yes even that part.

Until we chatted about this in IRC, however, I just assumed everyone could do this and it happened to everyone.  You know, just nerves releasing endorphins.

There's a whole subreddit dedicated to this subject, I forget what it's called, maybe just /r/ASMR. They collect animated gifs and videos that trigger the effect. Bob Ross is a popular one there too.

Also, for some reason, there's videos of girls doing pretend make-up, but instead of on a doll they apparently put a webcam and a stereo microphone where the head goes. It's simultaneously weird, creepy and exceptionally boring to watch.

I dunno if I'm sensitive to the effect, if I am, it's not much. Watching a couple of those vids with proper headphones (not the makeup ones though), did give me a very eerie and unreal feeling, it wasn't quite without effect, but nothing immediate or instantaneous like what I've read from descriptions (and probably because some of the videos were in fact quite eerie stop-motion surrealistic animations).
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Epimetheus on June 01, 2012, 03:39:15 pm
Okay, I think it may not be what I was thinking of, because this whole thing about recognizing that specific stimuli trigger it and being able to list them is alien to me. :shrug:
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Tiddleywomp Cockletit on June 12, 2012, 11:04:48 am
I think we had a whole thread about that awhile back, how just because people don't have a word handy for something doesn't mean they don't have the concept.

i always like the way the germans have approached this problem.

Rinderkennzeichnungs- und Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz.

I just put that through google translate.

Is real.  :eek:
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on June 12, 2012, 02:05:45 pm
i always like the way the germans have approached this problem.

Rinderkennzeichnungs- und Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz.

BY BLUDGEONING IT TO DEATH WITH GERMAN.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Faust on April 03, 2017, 09:51:18 pm
RISE!

This is one of the weird hobbies that has started turning into an obsession, filling my background at work and before I go to bed.

A few years back I heard a video called the virtual barbershop (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUDTlvagjJA) which weirded me out but was an oddly enjoyable sensation, from there I went looking for other hair cutting or layered audio videos and saw there were a lot of different types of videos which have over the last two years flourished into a massive community with some very cool sound editing, audio themes and roleplays.
It seems very much entrenched in relaxation which the sensation doesn't necessarily have to come with but it's nice that the default style of communication method is to try and sooth people.

There are some really fantastic videos out there so I thought I'd share some of the creators that have impressed me (earphones are necessary):

Ephemeral Rifts creepy character Margaret
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwTJ50jDl9E
His Soporific lampshade
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p1WjNBD6hHE

Heather Feather is one of the most widely known creators because her videos are always very good sound quality with interesting audio use but also because she is very funny
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRMtiYQaRzs

There is a guy who doesn't seem to have many followers, which is a shame because he's a sound engineer and his audio is some of the best out there, he does have jarring sounds, that are not relaxing at all, but really cause the ASMR trigger to kick in powerfully because of how unexpected they are
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGVOGldvzLo

ASMR Jellybean Green does a lot of role plays but the sounds she focuses on are very relaxing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eI0MDDxoxk
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Bu☆ns on April 06, 2017, 02:38:43 am
There is a guy who doesn't seem to have many followers, which is a shame because he's a sound engineer and his audio is some of the best out there, he does have jarring sounds, that are not relaxing at all, but really cause the ASMR trigger to kick in powerfully because of how unexpected they are
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGVOGldvzLo

Well that certainly is mindfucky enough lol.  I'm not sure if it's asmr or not but wife and I use to fall asleep listening to Ken Nordine - Word Jazz (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXLWKz4J-DI#t=20s) on the chicago radio on sunday night.  This guy here, reminds me somewhat of Ken Nordine.

I found a couple of asmr reiki videos.  i have to wonder if one could get a "legitimate" reiki experience via youtube.   

Heather Feather seems like a very sincere person -- in that "couldn't hide it if she tried" kind of way. 


Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Mesozoic Mister Nigel on April 06, 2017, 03:25:33 am
I just hope that in the future, ASMR videos are a source of vast bemusement and perplexity.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Bu☆ns on April 06, 2017, 03:36:33 am
I just hope that in the future, ASMR videos are a source of vast bemusement and perplexity.

Some are pretty outlandish
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: P3nT4gR4m on April 06, 2017, 12:29:44 pm
I just hope that in the future, ASMR videos are a source of vast bemusement and perplexity.

I hope in the future most avenues of human culture are perceived this way. I'll feel vindicated
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Faust on April 06, 2017, 02:21:28 pm
There is a guy who doesn't seem to have many followers, which is a shame because he's a sound engineer and his audio is some of the best out there, he does have jarring sounds, that are not relaxing at all, but really cause the ASMR trigger to kick in powerfully because of how unexpected they are
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGVOGldvzLo

Well that certainly is mindfucky enough lol.  I'm not sure if it's asmr or not but wife and I use to fall asleep listening to Ken Nordine - Word Jazz (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXLWKz4J-DI#t=20s) on the chicago radio on sunday night.  This guy here, reminds me somewhat of Ken Nordine.

I found a couple of asmr reiki videos.  i have to wonder if one could get a "legitimate" reiki experience via youtube.   

Heather Feather seems like a very sincere person -- in that "couldn't hide it if she tried" kind of way.

These a new zealand guy Massage ASMR who does Reiki videos, I don't get much out of them because they are more about the hand gestures, but he has an amazing video with the tuning forks and Tibetan singing bowls and those are very relaxing. https://www.youtube.com/user/MassageASMR/videos

I'm fairly certain that Ken Nordine guy is trying to hypnotise me.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Faust on April 19, 2017, 04:16:47 pm
I thought this was quite a funny use of the first person perspective, the video is a typical sketching video, lots of people have done them, the funny little twist(spoilers) at the end is when he holds up the finished Sketch, we are Bob Ross.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6KUjP9hL7I
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Pergamos on May 07, 2017, 08:51:10 am
My offspring is very into ASMR videos.  They make me feel kind of weird, but they are creepy enough that I can't watch one long enough to really evaluate my response without feeling gross so I don't quite understand what kind of weird.

They usually consist of a young woman whispering and doing things near the camera accompanied by the sounds those things might make. This includes things like shaving the viewer's face, massaging the viewer, or crumpling paper.  It's intimate in a way that is kind of uncomfortable for me, particularly in the company of my offspring.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: LuciferX on May 07, 2017, 10:16:25 am
This ASMR stuff should be approached with extreme prejudice. It's part of an ancient practice called Carezza, often practiced together with the waka-waka. Above my pay-grade, so I don't mess with it.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Faust on May 09, 2017, 12:31:03 am
I had not heard of carezza, you mean this?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coitus_reservatus

For the same reason I don't find Massage Sexy, I don't find ASMR sexy. It puts me to sleep. It mellows out my anxieties and makes me forget that I am running in twenty different directions.

It is intimate though, very much so, and I can understand why you would feel uncomfortable around relatives Pergamos. I find those face touching, shaving videos a bit shocking, very invasive of personal space, not in a bad way but very sensitive and raw.

It is yet another facet of our daily lives that now has a digitised knock off, we can post opinions for validation, get our humour stories, escapism and pornography online, now we can also get intimate experience without the need for a connection to another person. I'm not sure if its a good or bad thing.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: rong on May 09, 2017, 02:46:45 am
When I get a hair cut, it takes every ounce of self control to not fly out of the chair when the clippers buzz around to back of my neck.  Is this ASMR?
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Faust on May 09, 2017, 08:15:07 am
When I get a hair cut, it takes every ounce of self control to not fly out of the chair when the clippers buzz around to back of my neck.  Is this ASMR?

Probably the same mechanism, neck is vulnrable and tender, do you get the same effect when listening to the virtual barbershop?
https://youtu.be/IUDTlvagjJA
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Kai on May 09, 2017, 02:06:59 pm
I realized I reacted to ASMR videos several years ago. Not all of them, certainly not the head touching ones, but the page turning and paper crinkling ones were particularly effective. How could I not know this about myself for 30 years? Not that I buy any of the pseudo-science nonsense about why it's happening. Just another one of those weird things about humans that neurologists haven't figured out yet.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Faust on May 09, 2017, 05:13:31 pm
Not too many people attribute anything mystical to it, though some of the Woo and Reiki guys occasionally say there is. The effect appears to be linked to the way the brain constructs spacial awareness from sound/pressure stimuli. Why a tingling sensation I don't know, I've seen it suggested it's purpose is likely similar to the linkage between smell + memory but the exact purpose I haven't seen suggested.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Mesozoic Mister Nigel on May 17, 2017, 12:09:57 am
I'd still really love to get some fMRI sets of people having ASMR.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: Mesozoic Mister Nigel on May 17, 2017, 12:13:06 am
Although, my guess is that these people are already on it.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17470919.2016.1188851
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: PoFP on June 19, 2017, 03:52:39 pm
Although, my guess is that these people are already on it.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17470919.2016.1188851

I also can't wait for those ASMR-Active fMRI scans.

I find it interesting that the the pattern they found in the types of triggering stimuli is that they are generally socially-based/intimate. While I do have positive reactions to a few common ASMR videos/types, I've found that my strongest ASMR-type reaction involves no human-interaction whatsoever. It is largely triggered by music/specific thoughts, and after it's been triggered enough in a short period of time (After about 5-10 minutes), I'm able to trigger it manually without any external stimuli.

I imagine that difference in my experience could be related to addictive tendencies combined with LTP strengthening the connections they've isolated in the DMN of affected individuals.
Title: Re: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response
Post by: LuciferX on June 20, 2017, 01:55:13 am
I had not heard of carezza, you mean this?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coitus_reservatus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coitus_reservatus)

For the same reason I don't find Massage Sexy, I don't find ASMR sexy. It puts me to sleep. It mellows out my anxieties and makes me forget that I am running in twenty different directions.

[...]


Actually kind-of/sorta. Less Gnostic, more voodoo. Instead of focusing on conserving/extending final phases of intercourse, it is used much in the manner you describe to lull a potential partner into a compliant sense of affinity during initial phases. Probably the oldest trick in the book, maybe related to what the PUA bois have taken to call anchoring.

For it to be a normal expression of affection is just fine with me, however its calculated use to manipulate the feelings of others for personal gain, well that's another story. I expect proximity ASMR remote devices to be sold some time soon, if there isn't already an app for that, so we can all wontonly go about giving people indiscriminite chills to short-circuit the process of human bonding. Good times... Good times. :horrormirth: