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Messages - Faust

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1
Roaring Biscuit was cool and did the gorgeous Musings of a Faceless man

http://www.principiadiscordia.com/bip/Musings-of-a-Faceless-Man.pdf

2
I tried going outside last night.

Some guy tried to pee in the front door and a bunch of kids were throwing rocks at a car.

We should swap you can put on some fake tan and join The only way is Essex, and I'll make friends with the porchpisser or the little raskles.

3
Meh, I suppose it's just the joys of being a hermit and working from home and all, its weird, I find myself less likely to censor myself when talking to work colleagues (when I should), and find myself much more nervous around people I don't know then I used to.

4
It's been a busy week. Teaching in the mornings, slicing snake brains in the afternoons. Next week will be a little lighter, as the teaching part ends and I move into slightly less than full-time slicing.

So much slicing. So many brains.

Is it just me, or has everyone on PD gotten a little weird the last couple of years?   :lulz:

 :lulz: :lulz: :lulz:

I guess you could say that.

I'm getting more weird but not in a good way.

5
Goth was an elaborate hoax that started sometime in the fourtiers as a defiant gesture to the establishment by the nihilistic beat generation.
It hit its peak in the mid fifties, with goth artists, musicians, actors and writers creating what went on to become the defining staples of goth culture.

While goth culture sat uneasily with many conservative elements no one could deny its importance and people like Fermi, Von Braun and Feynman were household names.

By the end of the fifties goth culture was saturated, and it was at this point that its critics seized the opportunity to strike, they slated the goth mainstream as having become derivative or lacking in meaning. New goth artists struggled to establish themselves in a society that now found them cliche.

The final nail in the coffin for goth culture came with the assassination of the beloved American president JFK in Dallas in 1963 by the struggling and admittedly mediocre goth interpretive dancer Lee Oswald. With that the last of the enthusiasm that had once filled a thriving subculture was snuffed out.

And that, as they say, is that.

6
You guys have a legit problem with making new people feel welcome. Anyone whom is slightly immature you label poptart and ban.
Not so much any more.

7
Bring and Brag / Re: Unicorns with Dicks for Horns
« on: July 22, 2015, 06:36:38 pm »
thx

8
Is finding the actual intro thread a test or something?

Found Discordianism about two years back because I found the 'ddate' command in Linux and was wondering what that was all about. A cursory look made me think I could use some of it for some worldbuilding I was doing so I started reading into more...

...and I think I accidentally converted myself.  :horrormirth: So, uh....hi?

Fairly certain I started out the same way, playing in an RPG with Discordian elements and wanting to know more.

9
http://www.rte.ie/news/2015/0722/716350-bionic-eye/

Quote

A partially sighted British pensioner has had his central vision partially restored for the first time in nearly a decade after he received a "bionic eye".

The 80-year-old man is the world's first patient with advanced dry age related macular degeneration or AMD to undergo the procedure.

AMD is the most common cause of sight loss in the developed world with between 20 and 25 million sufferers worldwide.

Manchester man Ray Flynn's central vision has been deteriorating for the last eight years as a result of untreatable AMD, leaving him with just peripheral vision and affecting his quality of life.

Last month he received a retinal implant during a four-hour operation.

It converts video images captured by a miniature camera in his glasses into a series of electrical impulses transmitted wirelessly to electrodes on the surface of the retina.

The pulses stimulate the retina's remaining cells resulting in the corresponding perception of patterns of light in the brain, which the patient learns to interpret in order to regain some visual function.

Since his system was turned on three weeks ago, Mr Flynn can now make out the outline of people and objects, even with his eyes closed.

130 patients worldwide with the rare disease retinitis pigmentosa have already successfully used the bionic implant.

However, this is the first time a patient with peripheral vision has received one, making it the first known case of a human having combined natural and artificial sight.

So it's up to 130 of these out in the wild now. The design has already come down in size, offloading the processing to the side pack.

While these are still in a blurry state data gathered from these people will allow them to make further improvements as they learn more about how to interface with the optic nerve.

The interesting thing highlighted is that he doesn't need his eyes open for this and the portability of the camera: obviously its easier to get knocked off his head, hence the bulky safety goggles which would be a risk if blind patients were to drop them in busy or dangerous areas after becoming accustomed to using them, but with the option of being able to position these he could literally have eyes in the back of his head.

The nature of the camera as a standard ccd/cmos camera means that shit can be networked. He could potentially have cameras around his house to see each room. Or a strip joint on the far side of the planet... or a drone :(

Either way, its a technology that really impresses me. It may not be applicable everywhere (if the persons optic nerves are damaged, they would be hard to interface with), but we have the potential now to minimise cases of blindness (at least in the first world nations).

10
See, yeah, I don't remember any of those things.

Maybe that's for the best, I mean if you enjoyed it that's the most important thing.

11
I'd have to watch it again to give it justification (even for a film I don't like I'd like to keep my criticisms fair) so I'll try keep to what I can remember.

The world is established as failing, with food sources becoming more and more scarce which is a good premise to lead into the space expedition and the body of the film.

From the very beginning, every character is shown in a morose even miserable state, fine, we've established their lives are shit and they are all probably going to die.

After the characters are introduced and the back story is given right up to the end of the film every scene boils down a repetitive cycle of
A sacrifice which hurts loved ones.

What would be cool would be an exploration of their humanity and how the people affected react to that, but every time its the same delivery be it from the beginning of Matthew Mcconaughey leaving his kids, to Michael Cains crying deathbed speech, to Anne Hathaway's husband sacrifice: People start blubbering and crying while the person they are playing off has the stony face.
Every choice in the film is the same, every reaction to the choice is the same.

Michael Cain's deathbed scene and the heavy handed repeated use of "Do not go gentle into that good night", were the parts that killed the movie for me.

I don't mind depressing films, people crying doesn't make me uncomfortable, its that in this case I found it repetitive to the point of killing all suspension of disbelief.

I find it at odds with what they are portraying, with beautifully stunning visuals and a story that boils down to the spirit of exploration and a last hope. The emotional content instead portrays of film of people presented by adversity and completely crushed by it until the deus ex at the end.

Perhaps I am being too picky but I don't think it would have taken much to completely change the tone of the film: one, two at the most scenes of a little gallows humour would have restored the human element of the story for me and to feel a reality to the characters.
Because the alternative, when every character acts the same, is a portrayal of a shitty miserable human race that didn't deserve to colonise another world.

12
It was the gravity that was raising the water. Lifting two feet of water 200 feet in the air. Aside from the fact that there wasn't enough water on the planet to make a wave that big the gravitational force that was holding up a gazillion tons of water but, at the same time, wasn't affecting the characters , robot or spaceship would, presumably have cancelled out most of the friction effect caused by the sea bed.

Maybe I'm off here. Maybe it was totally realistic but everything about it just stuck me as - get the fuck out of here  :eek:

Nah, the science checks out. Check out this thread: http://forum.kerbalspaceprogram.com/threads/101543-Calculating-tidal-forces-(Interstellar)

It doesn't check out too much. They explicitly say the water planet has 2 or 3 times earth gravity. To leave earth they needed a three stage separation rocket, and to leave this place they just fly off with tiny magic hover jets, but as I said, the science isn't the failing point of this film.

It has 1.3 times Earth gravity, but 1.81 Earth density, which means it would need a smaller delta-v to escape, not a larger one. In addition the competing gravitational pull from Gargantua is quite strong and consequently, once airborne, the craft needs little propulsion to enter space.

The physics, as far as I can see, are sound.

I stand corrected. I'd heard them say that it had the greater gravity but not the greater density. That's good attention to detail, and it would have been cool if they applied it to the other aspects of the film.

13
On the upside, everyone does say it's really good.

it's a two hour chase scene with implicit storytelling and fun costumes and I loved every second of it.

Everyone says that.  I must slay this film, if I am to be a critic.

Also, it gives me old man cred if I compare it unfavorably to movie #2, sort of like endlessly bitching about "new" Aerosmith.

I watched 2 a week before I went to it, Road Warrior is still my favourite but I preferred Fury Road to Thunderdome and the original film.

14
It was the gravity that was raising the water. Lifting two feet of water 200 feet in the air. Aside from the fact that there wasn't enough water on the planet to make a wave that big the gravitational force that was holding up a gazillion tons of water but, at the same time, wasn't affecting the characters , robot or spaceship would, presumably have cancelled out most of the friction effect caused by the sea bed.

Maybe I'm off here. Maybe it was totally realistic but everything about it just stuck me as - get the fuck out of here  :eek:

Nah, the science checks out. Check out this thread: http://forum.kerbalspaceprogram.com/threads/101543-Calculating-tidal-forces-(Interstellar)

It doesn't check out too much. They explicitly say the water planet has 2 or 3 times earth gravity. To leave earth they needed a three stage separation rocket, and to leave this place they just fly off with tiny magic hover jets, but as I said, the science isn't the failing point of this film.

15
On the upside, everyone does say it's really good.

it's a two hour chase scene with implicit storytelling and fun costumes and I loved every second of it.

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