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Messages - PoFP

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1
Glad you and Don are okay/alive!



Came into the office today to learn that our IT department decided to block network access to several of our team's necessary web applications (And Facebook!  :argh!: ). The last time they did this, they did it by blocking access to some applications on only our system-wide proxy, and blocking other applications on the DIRECT connection, which was easily bypassed with a simple modification to our proxy script. But now they've blocked all kinds of shit on BOTH the proxy and DIRECT connection.

If someone had told me that I was gonna have to solve riddles in order to perform my required job functions, I would've joined Nicholas Cage as a Treasure Hunter.

Also, it's shit like this that makes security breaches like those that made our executives have a couple heart attacks last week well-deserved.

I'm so glad the company I'm supporting via contract is interested in my skills. My company obviously doesn't give a shit.

2
Think for Yourself, Schmuck! / Re: Reality Safari: Gurdjieff
« on: Yesterday at 06:17:00 pm »
In our group, we've been talking about the Black Iron Prison. (They don't use the "black iron" part, but it's defintiely the same idea.)

Our automatism takes over our lives. We need habits and schemas and heuristics, but we get stuck in them like machines.

Through dilligent and continual self-observation, we can develop an internal "watcher" who can notice when we have slipped into our mechanical routines.

When you notice yourself acting mechanically, that in itself is a type of freedom (or a sign post pointing towards it). When you observe the Robot, the part of you making the observation is not the Robot. If only we could remember that part of ourselves all the time...


There are practical things you can do, physically, which help you develop this watcher. The body and mind and emotions are tightly linked. Your postures and habits always seem to lead you back to your normal automatic way of being. You might try to be different from how you are today, but then you fall into a habit (smoking a cigarette, answering the phone, whatever) and suddenly the Robot is driving again. So maybe there are postures and movements which the robot cannot do. If we experiment with them, perhaps we can find a new way of thinking, feeling, being.

This got me thinking about the behavioral tendencies of those who always seem to counter the status quo and the natural order of things, and how they connect to the brain.

I'm sure we all remember that kid from grade-school that wouldn't keep still. He/she's always rocking back and forth in their chair, tapping their feet, tapping their pencil on the desk, tilting the desk back and forth, etc. They were often clumsy, and would occasionally tilt their chair back too far and eat shit in front of the whole class. And on the other end of the spectrum, we all remember that person who was almost pathologically consistent and precise with their movements. They didn't move unless they had to, and when they did, they tried to make sure it was quiet and unnoticeable. Each action was often completely calculated.

These behavioral tendencies represent the opposing sides of the awareness/consciousness scale from a neurological standpoint.

The kid who can't stop moving is often described as the kid with ADHD. More complex disorder symptom presentations exist, of course, but for the sake of simplicity and concision, this will suffice.

The kid who calculates all of their decisions and movements could potentially have some sort of OCD or anxiety disorder.

Each of these disorders is involved with the relationship between the Basal Ganglia, which is an important set of brain structures that are essential for the Reward Center of the brain, and the Prefrontal Cortex, which is responsible for establishment of memory, as well as conscious awareness and lucidity. It's theorized that focus and attention manifest as a result of a reverberating feedback loop between these two brain structures, and that dysfunction of this circuit results in disorders like those described above.

When the Basal Ganglia is active, but requires higher-order processing for executive function, it triggers activation of the Prefrontal Cortex. Here, information is processed and stored for later retrieval in the form of consequence cognition, and other information required for conscious decision-making. When the prefrontal cortex is finished, it sends a "cool, message received and handled, now fuck off" message back to the Basal Ganglia, reducing its overall activity to prepare it for the firing it will need to re-activate the prefrontal cortex in the future. For the kid with ADHD, this relationship is weak. The Basal Ganglia's signals aren't strong enough to trigger or maintain activation of the prefrontal cortex effectively, reducing the amount of information that is stored for executive functioning and memory, and reducing the person's overall awareness. The brain, which requires this relationship's success to function properly, craves dopaminergic release in the Basal Ganglia to strengthen the bond between the two structures, since they mainly communicate with Dopaminergic circuits. This is achieved with self-medication using stimulants, or with the excess physical activity we've been observing, since motor control in the brain is also regulated largely with Dopamine. This habitual, excessive physical activity acts as an anchor for consciousness and awareness, and demonstrates precisely what you were describing above. Without it, the ADHDer remains a slave to habitual monotony.

The person with calculated decisions has the exact opposite problem. Their Basal Ganglia is suppressed by excessive activation of the prefrontal cortex, and that "fuck off" message that gets sent as a response. They lack the ability to form the habits that allow them to go on autopilot, placing them in a state of constant awareness. Minor details, like their movements and physical actions, get hyper-analyzed and the person loses the ability to naturally focus on the important details in their current situation. The mind's reaction to this is the ability to multitask constantly, which overloads and exhausts the person, leaving them unwilling to go out of their comfort zone.

Most people who don't have pathologies are somewhere in between these two points on the awareness scale in terms of behavior and cognition. Developing a method for intentional, and productive (As opposed to habitual) awareness should likely be based on the neurological circuit behavior of the person who intends to change. For the person who is often too aware, the solution may be scheduling a simple set of actions to take regularly (Either every day, or every couple hours) that require little effort and attention, to allow for the prefrontal cortex to take a break from processing menial tasks once the scheduled task has become habitual. Otherwise, it may be applicable to take a GABA-A receptor agonist, like Valerian Root in order to calm the prefrontal cortex and allow for productive awareness when it's intended, and not at all times.

For the person who is often less aware, the solution could require stimulants to fix the imbalance, or similar actions to the ones you've described previously regarding leaving yourself triggers for momentary consciousness. It could also be assisted with the ADHDer's natural supplement: Excessive physical activity. Make it a point to tap your fingers or feet on something to anchor yourself to your surroundings and environment and trigger awareness. But be sure to avoid consistent timing and activity patterns, so as to prevent it from becoming a habit. As you mentioned before, the moment you perform something habitual, you put yourself at risk of losing your awareness.


I'm reading this James Moore biography of Gurdjieff. He keeps invoking this image of the Yazidi children who Gurdjieff played with when he was growing up. The Yazidi are thought of as devil worshippers. If you draw a circle of salt around a Yazidi, they won't be able to get out of it.

Gurdjieff's role as a teacher was to disturb the circle of salt that people draw around themselves.

For example, the Hartmanns came from an upper class background, approached Gurdjieff at the beginning of the Bolshevik Revolution. The Gurdjieff school was about to embark on a terrible and dangerous journey through the wilderness, ultimately passing through the front lines of the war five times before they found respite. A weak person would not survive. The Hartmanns wanted to join G, but he knew their status and propriety would be an enormous burden. So he began breaking them out of this circle of salt.

Gurdjieff, the sly man, lured the Hartmanns in by presenting himself as a wealthy prince, someone like them - but when they made the journey to meet him, he adopted the mannerisms of a pauper, made them stay in a hovel, and eat cheap food. (this, btw, was also an act)

When they were about to leave, Gurdjieff told Olga de Hartmann - "You won't be able to come with us. For money, we'll be getting jobs as rock breakers on the road. It's enormously hard work. At the end of the day, the women have to wash the men's feet, and Zaharoff's feet will be very smelly, so you won't be able to do it."

This puts Olga in the position of insisting that she can do it, this won't be an issue --  because this assertion comes from her, it is stronger and worth more than if somebody else told her she could do it. Gurdjieff had to shock her, tease out her strength, make her choose for herself to shed her status and ego. And then, she was ready to become.



that sly man

Very clever indeed. I'm building quite a bit of respect for Gurdjieff, even through indirect, interpreted understanding.

3
Apple Talk / Re: Open Bar: Free Russian Orphans with Every Purchase
« on: February 09, 2018, 04:04:28 pm »
Turing test should be treated as a gauge of human stupidity, not machine intelligence.

I'm beginning to think this is very accurate. I was actually thinking something similar after I came to my first realization. More to the effect of "Machine intelligence, as defined by the Turing Test, is directly proportional to the intelligence of the administrator (Or interrogator?) of the Turing Test."

4
Apple Talk / Re: Open Bar: Free Russian Orphans with Every Purchase
« on: February 09, 2018, 02:26:51 pm »
A customer submitted a support case with my organization using an automated system that includes one of those AIs that start chats with you on the webpage if you're waiting for a response. Well, even though the AI Chat window blatantly states that it's not a real person, the customer argued with it as if it were. When it told the customer that it is "Still learning" since it's "only been alive since 2017," she responded with "Oh, that is such an excuse."  :lulz:

She also felt the need to tell it that she gets "mad easy," and then decided to curse at it, but with exclamation points and underscores  :lulz:

Our team is losing our shit right now, because she's also misusing the case submission system, and resubmitting her chats as a case with updated portions of the conversation. So we're just getting a steady stream of unusable tickets that are chuck full of  :lulz:

EDIT: She just fucking apologized to the AI. Which made me realize that if/when AI do want to take over the world, they will do so without much resistance.

Tell her the bot has been reported to HR for sensitivity training.

 :lulz:  :lulz:

If I wasn't a contractor with limited privileges, I so would.


I'm just amazed that if we consider this chat log to be a Turing Test type situation, the machine passed the test while simultaneously warning the subject of its inhuman, unintelligent status at every possible opportunity. Didn't even know that was possible...

5
Apple Talk / Re: The *REAL* Evil in Today's Society
« on: February 09, 2018, 01:23:39 am »
They've found that instant coffee powder has Mu-opioid receptor antagonists, which may help. I mean, the Imodium (Mu-opioid receptor agonist in the peripheral nervous system) is no longer in your system, but any natural Mu-opioid receptor agonism that might be going on will be stopped, which should speed up your bowels. Otherwise, other things which are known to speed up bowel motility usually won't work on the constipation caused by Imodium.

I just drank water until the residual chlorine made my throat sore.

Then at 2 AM, I had a religious moment.

 :lulz:

 Hey man, whatever works.

6
Apple Talk / Re: Open Bar: Free Russian Orphans with Every Purchase
« on: February 08, 2018, 10:03:10 pm »
A customer submitted a support case with my organization using an automated system that includes one of those AIs that start chats with you on the webpage if you're waiting for a response. Well, even though the AI Chat window blatantly states that it's not a real person, the customer argued with it as if it were. When it told the customer that it is "Still learning" since it's "only been alive since 2017," she responded with "Oh, that is such an excuse."  :lulz:

She also felt the need to tell it that she gets "mad easy," and then decided to curse at it, but with exclamation points and underscores  :lulz:

Our team is losing our shit right now, because she's also misusing the case submission system, and resubmitting her chats as a case with updated portions of the conversation. So we're just getting a steady stream of unusable tickets that are chuck full of  :lulz:

EDIT: She just fucking apologized to the AI. Which made me realize that if/when AI do want to take over the world, they will do so without much resistance.

7
Apple Talk / Re: The *REAL* Evil in Today's Society
« on: February 08, 2018, 04:53:51 pm »
They've found that instant coffee powder has Mu-opioid receptor antagonists, which may help. I mean, the Imodium (Mu-opioid receptor agonist in the peripheral nervous system) is no longer in your system, but any natural Mu-opioid receptor agonism that might be going on will be stopped, which should speed up your bowels. Otherwise, other things which are known to speed up bowel motility usually won't work on the constipation caused by Imodium.

8
For the record: All these years later, that Jeep is STILL running.

WELL YOU BETTER GO CATCH IT

*Jumps off cliff*

9
Aneristic Illusions / Re: General Trump hilarity free-for-all thread
« on: February 07, 2018, 07:58:38 pm »
Do people appointed by Trump count as Trump Hilarity?

https://mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKBN1FP0IZ?__twitter_impression=true

Quote
Equifax (EFX.N) said in September that hackers stole personal data it had collected on some 143 million Americans. Richard Cordray, then the CFPB director, authorized an investigation that month, said former officials familiar with the probe.

But Cordray resigned in November and was replaced by Mulvaney, President Donald Trump's budget chief. The CFPB effort against Equifax has sputtered since then, said several government and industry sources, raising questions about how Mulvaney will police a data-warehousing industry that has enormous sway over how much consumers pay to borrow money.

The CFPB has the tools to examine a data breach like Equifax, said John Czwartacki, a spokesman, but the agency is not permitted to acknowledge an open investigation. "The bureau has the desire, expertise, and know-how in-house to vigorously pursue hypothetical matters such as these," he said.

Three sources say, though, Mulvaney, the new CFPB chief, has not ordered subpoenas against Equifax or sought sworn testimony from executives, routine steps when launching a full-scale probe. Meanwhile the CFPB has shelved plans for on-the-ground tests of how Equifax protects data, an idea backed by Cordray.

The CFPB also recently rebuffed bank regulators at the Federal Reserve, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency when they offered to help with on-site exams of credit bureaus, said two sources familiar with the matter.

Quote
...the CFPB fined credit bureaus more than $25 million just last year for over-marketing its monitoring services, which generated monthly fees.

10
Techmology and Scientism / Re: YEAH! Take that, cancer, YOU FUCKING FUCK!
« on: February 07, 2018, 07:29:07 pm »
foolproof

What if the patient has cancer and AIDS

EDIT:
Other than that sounds great though.

AIDS involves the destruction of T Helper Cells, which aren't the target of these treatment methods. As long as a person has killer T Cells, it doesn't matter what else they have.

11
Techmology and Scientism / YEAH! Take that, cancer, YOU FUCKING FUCK!
« on: February 07, 2018, 04:38:11 pm »
Great news coming out of the field of medicine recently: We, as a species, have found foolproof ways to cure cancer.

As it turns out, the most effective cancer killer is actually the body's immune system. The body's main microbe-killing cells are called killer T-Cells, which attach to foreign cells and threats once they've been binded with that threat's corresponding antibody. Antibodies are created by recognition and verification of the antigen structure of a foreign body by the T Helper Cells, and subsequent release by B-Cells. The interactions between antigens, antibodies, and the two types of T-Cells are the main focus of current cancer-cure research.

For those with a subset of blood cancers, they were able to narrow down a specific protein/antigen structure associated with the cancer cells and re-program killer T Cells to attack cells that contained this protein/antigen structure using gene modification therapy. They extract your T Cells from your blood using a transfusion machine, modify the genes, and plug them back into your bloodstream for immediate reactivation. Once the T Cells are released back into the body, they begin relentlessly attacking every single cancerous cell they find. This includes malignant cancer cells and benign tumors. This method has been tested on people, and the results were overwhelmingly positive. Almost every single patient treated went into PERMANENT REMISSION after the FIRST TREATMENT.

In a recent experiment with Mice, they tested a new method of immunotherapy involving training of killer T Cells, instead of just genetic reprogramming. Training a killer T Cell involves presenting them with a pre-constructed antibody that corresponds with the antigen structure of the cancer cells being targeted. They made a slight genetic alteration using a small DNA sequence added to the T Cells to make them more receptive to the specified antibody at their receptor sites (Areas where signaling proteins like antibodies bind to), and then shoved them both into a vial together. Then, they were injected into the tumors of the mice, allowing the T Cells to immediately begin attacking tumor cells and activating other T Cells within the tumor to boost the attack. As with the last experiment, almost every single organism tested went into permanent remission after the first treatment. The three mice that didn't get cured on the first treatment were completely cured after the second treatment.

While this is a HUGE breakthrough in medicine, there are a few risks you take when undergoing procedures like this. The first thing you have to worry about, which applies mostly to the first experimental treatment, is making sure that no other native cells in your body have the same antigen structure as the one the killer T Cells are looking for. When other native cells have the same antigen structure as the ones the T Cells are looking for, the T Cells will attack them along with the cancerous cells. This was the reality for at least one patient who received this treatment. She had a cancer of the colon/small intestines, which they reprogrammed some of her T cells to attack. Unfortunately, they didn't know that a type of cell in her lungs presented with the same antigen structure as the cancer cells in her gut. She died because the T Cells did irreparable damage to her lungs before they realized what was happening. T Cells work very fast.

The speed of T Cell work leads us to our next worry when receiving treatments like this: Cytotoxic Protein Storm.

When all cells die (Especially Tumor cells), they release a small amount of toxic material into the blood stream that is usually capable of being picked up by your immune system and filtered out. These toxic proteins and dead cell materials are capable of causing minor troubles in controlled amounts. In fact, some of the symptoms of Chemotherapy and Radiation therapy can be attributed to the death of cancer cells. But since chemo and radiation kill cancer cells at a moderate rate, the body is usually capable of withstanding this minor toxicity. But the rate at which the T Cells kill cancer cells is so high that it actually floods your body with large amounts of toxic, dead cell material that can cause severe problems in those who are immunologically compromised, or who simply have a weakener immune system.

That being said, I'd argue that these caveats are a small price to pay for the cure to cancer. The second method, which is far safer than the first, is bound for human trials over the coming months/years.

12
Bring and Brag / Re: P3nT's Shoops
« on: February 05, 2018, 07:28:24 pm »
Badass, man. Keep it up!

13
Bring and Brag / Re: P3nT's Shoops
« on: February 04, 2018, 05:42:36 pm »
 :mittens:

D-D-DAMN SON, WHERE'D YOU FIND THIS?

14
Bring and Brag / Re: I Fall
« on: February 01, 2018, 10:18:05 pm »
Shit, I think I put this in the wrong section of the forum. Probably should be in Bring and Brag. Feel free to move it there if you're an Admin.

Thank you!

15
Bring and Brag / I Fall
« on: February 01, 2018, 10:14:51 pm »
I Fall ~ P.D. Fernando

The irony of my strife
As I Fall through life:
I become petrified
That I will have died
Tumbling from a height
I could never rite.

As I Fall I see the dichotomous reality
Splitting and multiplying to display its duality.
I reach for its branches voraciously consuming
All of that which fades into view - looming.
I tear and rip through the branches that grow
To strive and to understand their ebb and flow,
The meaning behind them that shines - A lowe...

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