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Messages - LuciferX

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47
The Richard Nixon school of ballet and the arts / Re: Lighterspace
« on: April 13, 2015, 06:43:11 pm »
When you go to a party with two lighters and come home with three lighters you've never seen before, that's lighterspace.

When you reach around in your pocket and can't find a lighter, and then reach into the same pocket later and find several, that's lighterspace.

When you buy a 6-pack of lighters and lose them all inside your home in just a couple days, only to find half of them a week later congregated on the kitchen counter, that's lighterspace.

How has the vast and magical power of lighterspace affected your daily life?
Quote
Lighters move through lighterspace
amiright?

48
Think for Yourself, Schmuck! / Re: MRSA P FOR(UM}me
« on: April 08, 2015, 03:03:59 am »
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/news/pressreleases/2015/march/ancientbiotics---a-medieval-remedy-for-modern-day-superbugs.aspx
Quote
A one thousand year old Anglo-Saxon remedy for eye infections which originates from a manuscript in the British Library has been found to kill the modern-day superbug MRSA in an unusual research collaboration at The University of Nottingham.

Dr Christina Lee, an Anglo-Saxon expert from the School of English has enlisted the help of microbiologists from University’s Centre for Biomolecular Sciences to recreate a 10th century potion for eye infections from Bald’s Leechbook an Old English leatherbound volume in the British Library, to see if it really works as an antibacterial remedy. The Leechbook is widely thought of as one of the earliest known medical textbooks and contains Anglo-Saxon medical advice and recipes for medicines, salves and treatments.

Early results on the 'potion', tested in vitro at Nottingham and backed up by mouse model tests at a university in the United States, are, in the words of the US collaborator, “astonishing”. The solution has had remarkable effects on Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which is one of the most antibiotic-resistant bugs costing modern health services billions.


I'm very bummed that there doesn't seem to be a research article to go along with that press release, nor could I find anything in a search of scholarly papers. :(
Me too, the idealist in me says it's cause novartis/Pfizer would have jumped it.  And the cynic, well, fuck the cynic :\

49
The X Files were kinkier than you were led to believe.
Great, then I was also lead to believe in an unreasonable expectation of privacy, perfect.

50
Thank you for filling-out those custom forms, so refreshing these days, we'll be right with you.

51
Free choice, lets best wait
Forever disintegrating
Will without foreplay

Your job sounds terrible.
I know, it's like working hospitality at waste management :lulz:

52
Free choice, lets best wait
Forever disintegrating
Will without foreplay

53
Yea, yea, yea?  Vas is dat, vat is dis?

54
"T'was gaping like a pike, barbed by winged lore"
- Overheard in reading Ars Richteria, glossolalia.

55
Think for Yourself, Schmuck! / Re: MRSA P FOR(UM}me
« on: April 03, 2015, 06:18:49 am »
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/news/pressreleases/2015/march/ancientbiotics---a-medieval-remedy-for-modern-day-superbugs.aspx
Quote
A one thousand year old Anglo-Saxon remedy for eye infections which originates from a manuscript in the British Library has been found to kill the modern-day superbug MRSA in an unusual research collaboration at The University of Nottingham.

Dr Christina Lee, an Anglo-Saxon expert from the School of English has enlisted the help of microbiologists from University’s Centre for Biomolecular Sciences to recreate a 10th century potion for eye infections from Bald’s Leechbook an Old English leatherbound volume in the British Library, to see if it really works as an antibacterial remedy. The Leechbook is widely thought of as one of the earliest known medical textbooks and contains Anglo-Saxon medical advice and recipes for medicines, salves and treatments.

Early results on the 'potion', tested in vitro at Nottingham and backed up by mouse model tests at a university in the United States, are, in the words of the US collaborator, “astonishing”. The solution has had remarkable effects on Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which is one of the most antibiotic-resistant bugs costing modern health services billions. 

56
Literate Chaotic / Re: What do people use pet animals for
« on: April 01, 2015, 10:58:54 pm »

58
Last night I dreamt of being in a shopping cart that was slowly pushed through a large grey-alien intergalactic Kostco.  Greetings!  :lulz:

59
On a more practical level, though I am tired of knocking on my neighbors' doors to borrow a cup of sugar and having the entire facade collapse. Every fucking house in the city if a forgery, cleverly painted perspective pieces on cheap plywood.

My city is fallen Hollywood set pieces and druid prayer circles and I can't get any fucking sugar.

This needs to be taken out of context so badly.

It was a whole manic piece I had half crafted in my head before I threw it into two posts. I think I have the bug again but damn if it's been so long I have forgotten what to do with it. I thought of an ending to A New Currency while pooping the other day.
Oh 'tis all a "gimcrack world of facades". :lulz:

60
That a miracle/wonder may be a forgery/fabrication currently underwrites substantial US PSYOPS spending.  And, in case anyone's listening, yes, we did resolve an image for the Invisible Man Problem.

What Invisible Man Problem? I don't see any Invisible Man.
which is why we need to divert all funding to Project Masriel, it's our only hope for securing thought-freedom in the middle-east.

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