Author Topic: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece  (Read 7585 times)

maphdet

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #30 on: October 13, 2007, 12:24:36 am »
I've never seen Her associated with a hare.
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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #31 on: October 13, 2007, 01:46:26 am »
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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2007, 02:23:45 am »

Mother John Frumm

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2007, 02:36:49 am »
I think that if Eris worship involved the moon or the night then it could be that the Greeks saw a hare in the patterns on the moon. Also the mother of Eris in some schools of thought is the night or Nyx. That could be why the hare is associated with her, I've seen many depictions of the moon in mythology that coincide with that of a hare. Just a thought. I'm a real dork for mythology   :lol:
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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #34 on: October 13, 2007, 03:06:52 am »
I think that if Eris worship involved the moon or the night then it could be that the Greeks saw a hare in the patterns on the moon. Also the mother of Eris in some schools of thought is the night or Nyx. That could be why the hare is associated with her, I've seen many depictions of the moon in mythology that coincide with that of a hare. Just a thought. I'm a real dork for mythology   :lol:

I think it has more to do with the speed and cunning of a hare, as would be in exercises of competition. The reason for the snake is obvious.
One by one, we break the sheep from their Iron Bar Prisons and expand their imaginations, make them think for themselves. In turn, they break more from their prisons. Eventually, critical mass is reached. Our key word: Resolve. Evangelize with compassion and determination. And realize that there will be few in the beginning. We are hand picking our successors. They are the future of Discordianism. Let us guide our future with intelligence.

     --Reverse Brainwashing: A Guide http://www.principiadiscordia.com/forum/index.php?topic=9801.0


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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #35 on: October 13, 2007, 05:46:53 am »
I'm not doubting that, however in religious context things are rarely obvious. Most gods and goddesses are collections of older gods and goddesses that were absorbed and filtered by time. The Eris of today is not the dame from the Greeks, she has a lot of the same characteristics however people have absorbed and added apocrypha to the canon.
     Often the hare represents fertility, lust and regeneration, the moon is thought to represent most of those same things. It seems very likely that any worship of the night, (Nyx) may have well included Eris in the Chthonic times. The hare could also represent Aphrodite, whom Eris has an indirect relationship with. 
    Aphrodite was a known lover of Ares, Eris associates with him in like interests of war and chaos, or is in some stories his sister. Also in the more well know story of the golden apple, which I will not bother going into, Aphrodite is the "winner" of said apple.
    Eris was also know as Enyo, which is the name of one of the Graeae or the Grey Sisters who were pre-Olympic. She was called "the horror" and "the waster of cities".
     She resembles the Erinyes who were female personifications of vengeance, they were also know to be the children of Nyx. The Erinyes were connected with Nemesis (another child of Nyx and possibly yet another facet of Eris).They were similar to the Gorgons with the depiction of the wings as well as the stance in pottery like this representation of Eris. The Gorgons have an obvious link to the snake too.
    When it comes to the analysis of religions it is rarely cut and dry.


pardon the mental masturbation

   
"He took a duck in the face at two hundred and fifty knots"

   "...I also move for GPS drone fighting forces to guard McVeighs grave in case he re-rises like the messiah and plays games with me like Patrick Swaze did to Demi Moore in Ghost..."

Riches v. McVeigh et al  http://news.justia.com/cases/jonathan-lee-riches/

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2007, 10:02:35 am »
 :boot:

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #37 on: October 13, 2007, 04:25:31 pm »
I'm not doubting that, however in religious context things are rarely obvious. Most gods and goddesses are collections of older gods and goddesses that were absorbed and filtered by time. The Eris of today is not the dame from the Greeks, she has a lot of the same characteristics however people have absorbed and added apocrypha to the canon.
     Often the hare represents fertility, lust and regeneration, the moon is thought to represent most of those same things. It seems very likely that any worship of the night, (Nyx) may have well included Eris in the Chthonic times. The hare could also represent Aphrodite, whom Eris has an indirect relationship with. 
    Aphrodite was a known lover of Ares, Eris associates with him in like interests of war and chaos, or is in some stories his sister. Also in the more well know story of the golden apple, which I will not bother going into, Aphrodite is the "winner" of said apple.
    Eris was also know as Enyo, which is the name of one of the Graeae or the Grey Sisters who were pre-Olympic. She was called "the horror" and "the waster of cities".
     She resembles the Erinyes who were female personifications of vengeance, they were also know to be the children of Nyx. The Erinyes were connected with Nemesis (another child of Nyx and possibly yet another facet of Eris).They were similar to the Gorgons with the depiction of the wings as well as the stance in pottery like this representation of Eris. The Gorgons have an obvious link to the snake too.
    When it comes to the analysis of religions it is rarely cut and dry.


pardon the mental masturbation

   

I didn't consider the Gorgon connection. Thanks.
One by one, we break the sheep from their Iron Bar Prisons and expand their imaginations, make them think for themselves. In turn, they break more from their prisons. Eventually, critical mass is reached. Our key word: Resolve. Evangelize with compassion and determination. And realize that there will be few in the beginning. We are hand picking our successors. They are the future of Discordianism. Let us guide our future with intelligence.

     --Reverse Brainwashing: A Guide http://www.principiadiscordia.com/forum/index.php?topic=9801.0


6.5 billion Buddhas walking around.

99.xxxxxxx% forgot they are Buddha.

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #38 on: October 13, 2007, 04:26:39 pm »
I'm not doubting that, however in religious context things are rarely obvious. Most gods and goddesses are collections of older gods and goddesses that were absorbed and filtered by time. The Eris of today is not the dame from the Greeks, she has a lot of the same characteristics however people have absorbed and added apocrypha to the canon.
     Often the hare represents fertility, lust and regeneration, the moon is thought to represent most of those same things. It seems very likely that any worship of the night, (Nyx) may have well included Eris in the Chthonic times. The hare could also represent Aphrodite, whom Eris has an indirect relationship with. 
    Aphrodite was a known lover of Ares, Eris associates with him in like interests of war and chaos, or is in some stories his sister. Also in the more well know story of the golden apple, which I will not bother going into, Aphrodite is the "winner" of said apple.
    Eris was also know as Enyo, which is the name of one of the Graeae or the Grey Sisters who were pre-Olympic. She was called "the horror" and "the waster of cities".
     She resembles the Erinyes who were female personifications of vengeance, they were also know to be the children of Nyx. The Erinyes were connected with Nemesis (another child of Nyx and possibly yet another facet of Eris).They were similar to the Gorgons with the depiction of the wings as well as the stance in pottery like this representation of Eris. The Gorgons have an obvious link to the snake too.
    When it comes to the analysis of religions it is rarely cut and dry.


pardon the mental masturbation

   

Interesting stuff.  The link between hare and moon is somewhat weak, but no more so than any other conclusions you would draw from this, so I am willing to roll with it for now.

And yes, there is a definite Eris/Aphrodite connection.  The strife of love is a common theme in Greek mythology (I can only think of one happy marriage, that of Odysseus and Penelope), also Aphrodite is said to have a dual nature: she can be moderate and calm or wild and passionate.  Rather like Eris can be competitive or destructive.  The Iphigeneia at Aulis makes the connection explicit with this phrase concerning the Judgement of Paris:

Eros you imparted, by eros you were overwhelmed.
Hence Eris, Eris brings Greece with men and ships
to the citadel of Troy.

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #39 on: October 13, 2007, 05:14:28 pm »
by love you were imparted and overwhelmed, thus by strife you war.

cool.
One by one, we break the sheep from their Iron Bar Prisons and expand their imaginations, make them think for themselves. In turn, they break more from their prisons. Eventually, critical mass is reached. Our key word: Resolve. Evangelize with compassion and determination. And realize that there will be few in the beginning. We are hand picking our successors. They are the future of Discordianism. Let us guide our future with intelligence.

     --Reverse Brainwashing: A Guide http://www.principiadiscordia.com/forum/index.php?topic=9801.0


6.5 billion Buddhas walking around.

99.xxxxxxx% forgot they are Buddha.

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #40 on: October 14, 2007, 04:38:35 pm »
I've never seen Her associated with a hare.
Interesting find Cain!

I can't believe nobody has put this connection together yet . . .

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #41 on: October 14, 2007, 07:46:45 pm »
sorry to spoil the fun, but isn't that reference just something RAW made up to connect shoggoths with bugs bunny and the Illuminatus?
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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #42 on: October 14, 2007, 07:50:31 pm »
Yes.

I was also going to point out he was a wascally wabbit, but in fact he was originally drawn as a hare.

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #43 on: October 14, 2007, 09:48:20 pm »
sorry to spoil the fun, but isn't that reference just something RAW made up to connect shoggoths with bugs bunny and the Illuminatus?

Your point?
“Soon all of us will have special names” — Professor Brian O’Blivion

"Now's not the time to get silly, so wear your big boots and jump on the garbage clowns." — Bob Dylan?

"Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself, I am large, I contain multitudes" — Walt Whitman

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Re: Credible evidence of Erisian worship in Ancient Greece
« Reply #44 on: October 15, 2007, 10:44:14 pm »
Hoops, it looks like it's both native to Europe, and more shrub-like, so I'm guessing it's not that easy to find. 

That's what I suspected.  Even if I went to Europe I doubt I'd be able to differentiate from any other plant.  They all look alike to me . . . I know, I know, it isn't PC of me to admit that, but its true.  I'm a Chlorophyll Nazi.

Hey Cain, I think they have Blackthorn in England and Scotland, no?  Care to send me some?
“Soon all of us will have special names” — Professor Brian O’Blivion

"Now's not the time to get silly, so wear your big boots and jump on the garbage clowns." — Bob Dylan?

"Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself, I am large, I contain multitudes" — Walt Whitman