Author Topic: Weekly Science Headlines  (Read 229339 times)

Brother Mythos

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1125 on: June 21, 2017, 04:06:24 am »
“New evidence that all stars are born in pairs”

As per the article:

‘Astronomers have even searched for a companion to our sun, a star dubbed Nemesis because it was supposed to have kicked an asteroid into Earth’s orbit that collided with our planet and exterminated the dinosaurs. It has never been found.

The new assertion is based on a radio survey of a giant molecular cloud filled with recently formed stars in the constellation Perseus, and a mathematical model that can explain the Perseus observations only if all sunlike stars are born with a companion.

“We are saying, yes, there probably was a Nemesis, a long time ago,” said co-author Steven Stahler, a UC Berkeley research astronomer.

“We ran a series of statistical models to see if we could account for the relative populations of young single stars and binaries of all separations in the Perseus molecular cloud, and the only model that could reproduce the data was one in which all stars form initially as wide binaries. These systems then either shrink or break apart within a million years.”’

Here’s the link to the article: http://news.berkeley.edu/2017/06/13/new-evidence-that-all-stars-are-born-in-pairs/

And, for hardcore astronomy students, here’s the link to the original arXiv.org paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.00049

By shrinking, I assume they mean one star/big mass ate the other?

I would think that it is a possibility, but that particular scenario isn’t mentioned in the arXiv.org paper.

As I understand it, the authors believe that the stars in the particular cluster they studied either circle in closer together and remain binary systems, or they separate entirely.

Barring another big mass passing by, I am unsure how they would separate.

Have you talked about this article/paper with any of the professional astronomers you work with? If so, I would be interested in hearing their opinion(s).

The Good Reverend Roger

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1126 on: June 21, 2017, 11:38:19 pm »
“New evidence that all stars are born in pairs”

As per the article:

‘Astronomers have even searched for a companion to our sun, a star dubbed Nemesis because it was supposed to have kicked an asteroid into Earth’s orbit that collided with our planet and exterminated the dinosaurs. It has never been found.

The new assertion is based on a radio survey of a giant molecular cloud filled with recently formed stars in the constellation Perseus, and a mathematical model that can explain the Perseus observations only if all sunlike stars are born with a companion.

“We are saying, yes, there probably was a Nemesis, a long time ago,” said co-author Steven Stahler, a UC Berkeley research astronomer.

“We ran a series of statistical models to see if we could account for the relative populations of young single stars and binaries of all separations in the Perseus molecular cloud, and the only model that could reproduce the data was one in which all stars form initially as wide binaries. These systems then either shrink or break apart within a million years.”’

Here’s the link to the article: http://news.berkeley.edu/2017/06/13/new-evidence-that-all-stars-are-born-in-pairs/

And, for hardcore astronomy students, here’s the link to the original arXiv.org paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.00049

By shrinking, I assume they mean one star/big mass ate the other?

I would think that it is a possibility, but that particular scenario isn’t mentioned in the arXiv.org paper.

As I understand it, the authors believe that the stars in the particular cluster they studied either circle in closer together and remain binary systems, or they separate entirely.

Barring another big mass passing by, I am unsure how they would separate.

Have you talked about this article/paper with any of the professional astronomers you work with? If so, I would be interested in hearing their opinion(s).

I'm not there anymore.  I left at the beginning of the year.  I'm doing something entirely different right now, and I don't worry much about the stars.  Instead I worry about potable water, sewers, and urban failure modes.
" It's just that Depeche Mode were a bunch of optimistic loveburgers."
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Brother Mythos

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1127 on: June 22, 2017, 06:03:06 am »
“New evidence that all stars are born in pairs”

As per the article:

‘Astronomers have even searched for a companion to our sun, a star dubbed Nemesis because it was supposed to have kicked an asteroid into Earth’s orbit that collided with our planet and exterminated the dinosaurs. It has never been found.

The new assertion is based on a radio survey of a giant molecular cloud filled with recently formed stars in the constellation Perseus, and a mathematical model that can explain the Perseus observations only if all sunlike stars are born with a companion.

“We are saying, yes, there probably was a Nemesis, a long time ago,” said co-author Steven Stahler, a UC Berkeley research astronomer.

“We ran a series of statistical models to see if we could account for the relative populations of young single stars and binaries of all separations in the Perseus molecular cloud, and the only model that could reproduce the data was one in which all stars form initially as wide binaries. These systems then either shrink or break apart within a million years.”’

Here’s the link to the article: http://news.berkeley.edu/2017/06/13/new-evidence-that-all-stars-are-born-in-pairs/

And, for hardcore astronomy students, here’s the link to the original arXiv.org paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.00049

By shrinking, I assume they mean one star/big mass ate the other?

I would think that it is a possibility, but that particular scenario isn’t mentioned in the arXiv.org paper.

As I understand it, the authors believe that the stars in the particular cluster they studied either circle in closer together and remain binary systems, or they separate entirely.

Barring another big mass passing by, I am unsure how they would separate.

Have you talked about this article/paper with any of the professional astronomers you work with? If so, I would be interested in hearing their opinion(s).

I'm not there anymore.  I left at the beginning of the year.  I'm doing something entirely different right now, and I don't worry much about the stars.  Instead I worry about potable water, sewers, and urban failure modes.

As I don’t come here every day, or read all of the threads, I didn’t know you had moved on. But, now that I do, I have a greater understanding of the significance of your new signature.

The Good Reverend Roger

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1128 on: June 23, 2017, 01:22:50 am »
Yeah, that was my first project.  The Ukrainians were kind enough to prove our case in the wild, right after we proved it in an old "atomic town" in Nevada.

 :lulz:
" It's just that Depeche Mode were a bunch of optimistic loveburgers."
- TGRR, shaming himself forever, 7/8/2017

 "Billy, when I say that ethics is our number one priority and safety is also our number one priority, you should take that to mean exactly what I said. Also quality. That's our number one priority as well. Don't look at me that way, you're in the corporate world now and this is how it works."
- TGRR, raising the bar at work.

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1129 on: June 27, 2017, 09:57:05 am »
Mind hacking gets an upgrade

Quote
the study offers new evidence that the neural dimensions of concept representation are universal across people and languages.

Ho ho ho! :evil:
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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1130 on: June 28, 2017, 07:39:42 pm »
Craig Venter hasn't shown up on any of my feeds for a while. Looks like he's been busy 3-d printing biology from his laptop.

Quote
If there is a pandemic, everyone around you is dying and you cannot go outdoors, you can download the vaccine in a couple of seconds from the internet,” says Venter. A machine like this in hospitals, homes, and remote areas could revolutionize medicine.

Not actually a meat product.
Ass-Kicking & Foot-Stomping Ancient Master of SHIT FUCK FUCK FUCK
Awful and Bent Behemothic Results of Last Night's Painful Squat.
High Altitude Haggis-Filled Sex Bucket From Beyond Time and Space.
Internet Monkey Person of Filthy and Immoral Pygmy-Porn Wart Contagion
Octomom Auxillary Heat Exchanger Repairman
walking the fine line line between genius and batshit fucking crazy

"computation is a pattern in the spacetime arrangement of particles, and it’s not the particles but the pattern that really matters! Matter doesn’t matter." -- Max Tegmark

Brother Mythos

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1131 on: June 28, 2017, 08:19:03 pm »
Craig Venter hasn't shown up on any of my feeds for a while. Looks like he's been busy 3-d printing biology from his laptop.

Quote
If there is a pandemic, everyone around you is dying and you cannot go outdoors, you can download the vaccine in a couple of seconds from the internet,” says Venter. A machine like this in hospitals, homes, and remote areas could revolutionize medicine.

“The current prototype can produce only DNA, not proteins or living cells, but even that could be enough to make the device practical.”

Talk about your understatements. Wow!

Brother Mythos

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1132 on: June 29, 2017, 08:33:01 pm »
”Sleeping for Centuries?”

“Is Human Hibernation Possible? Going to Sleep for Long Duration Spaceflight”


Here’s a quotation from the article:

“When humans freeze, ice crystals form in our cells, rupturing them permanently. There is one line of research that offers some hope: cryogenics. This process replaces the fluids of the human body with an antifreeze agent which doesn’t form the same destructive crystals.

Scientists have successfully frozen and then unfrozen 50-milliliters (almost a quarter cup) of tissue without any damage.

In the next few years, we’ll probably see this technology expanded to preserving organs for transplant, and eventually entire bodies, and maybe even humans. Then this science fiction idea might actually turn into reality. We’ll finally be able to sleep our way between the stars.”

Here’s the link: https://www.universetoday.com/136146/human-hibernation-possible-going-sleep-long-duration-spaceflight/

The Good Reverend Roger

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1133 on: June 29, 2017, 10:00:02 pm »
”Sleeping for Centuries?”

“Is Human Hibernation Possible? Going to Sleep for Long Duration Spaceflight”


Here’s a quotation from the article:

“When humans freeze, ice crystals form in our cells, rupturing them permanently. There is one line of research that offers some hope: cryogenics. This process replaces the fluids of the human body with an antifreeze agent which doesn’t form the same destructive crystals.

Scientists have successfully frozen and then unfrozen 50-milliliters (almost a quarter cup) of tissue without any damage.

In the next few years, we’ll probably see this technology expanded to preserving organs for transplant, and eventually entire bodies, and maybe even humans. Then this science fiction idea might actually turn into reality. We’ll finally be able to sleep our way between the stars.”

Here’s the link: https://www.universetoday.com/136146/human-hibernation-possible-going-sleep-long-duration-spaceflight/

Woot.  And also we can freeze historians and unfreeze them for a year every decade so they can record the changes in society.

Sure, it's rough on them, but science isn't always pretty.
" It's just that Depeche Mode were a bunch of optimistic loveburgers."
- TGRR, shaming himself forever, 7/8/2017

 "Billy, when I say that ethics is our number one priority and safety is also our number one priority, you should take that to mean exactly what I said. Also quality. That's our number one priority as well. Don't look at me that way, you're in the corporate world now and this is how it works."
- TGRR, raising the bar at work.

P3nT4gR4m

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1134 on: July 07, 2017, 12:24:45 pm »
So we can bake normal maps onto IRL now

For some reason this just totally made me giggle uncontrollaby  :lulz:
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Ass-Kicking & Foot-Stomping Ancient Master of SHIT FUCK FUCK FUCK
Awful and Bent Behemothic Results of Last Night's Painful Squat.
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Internet Monkey Person of Filthy and Immoral Pygmy-Porn Wart Contagion
Octomom Auxillary Heat Exchanger Repairman
walking the fine line line between genius and batshit fucking crazy

"computation is a pattern in the spacetime arrangement of particles, and it’s not the particles but the pattern that really matters! Matter doesn’t matter." -- Max Tegmark

Brother Mythos

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1135 on: July 12, 2017, 02:52:10 pm »
“The Third Thumb - Winner of the Helen Hamlyn Award for Creativity.”

Here’s a quote from the website:

“The human thumb has a really dynamic movement, the opposing movements working together make the thumb more functional than a single finger. The Third Thumb replicates these movements by using two motors pulling against the natural tension of a flexible 3d printed material. The motors are controlled by two pressure sensors retrofitted into your shoes, under your toes, and communicate to the thumb via Bluetooth connection. The foot control is inspired by products that help to develop the already strong connection between our hands and our feet. For example driving a car, using a sewing machine, or playing a piano.”

Here’s the link, for those who have always dreamed of having a third thumb:
http://www.daniclodedesign.com/thethirdthumb

tyrannosaurus vex

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1136 on: July 13, 2017, 06:07:11 am »
“The Third Thumb - Winner of the Helen Hamlyn Award for Creativity.”

Here’s a quote from the website:

“The human thumb has a really dynamic movement, the opposing movements working together make the thumb more functional than a single finger. The Third Thumb replicates these movements by using two motors pulling against the natural tension of a flexible 3d printed material. The motors are controlled by two pressure sensors retrofitted into your shoes, under your toes, and communicate to the thumb via Bluetooth connection. The foot control is inspired by products that help to develop the already strong connection between our hands and our feet. For example driving a car, using a sewing machine, or playing a piano.”

Here’s the link, for those who have always dreamed of having a third thumb:
http://www.daniclodedesign.com/thethirdthumb

neural link or gtfo
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Freeky

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1137 on: July 13, 2017, 07:45:19 am »
If someone does the “Fine, you’re right, I’m clearly a terrible person, I’m Satan, I’m the worst person alive, I should just die” thing in response to criticism of their harmful behavior, they are trying to manipulate people and flip the situation around so that they look like a victim.

As a neuroscientist I have to disagree with the perception that anyone is doing mathematical modeling of cognitive intelligence, yet; intelligence as an economist defines it, yes, but economists are worlds away from actual cognition.


Although it is outside the purview of this organization to offer personal advice, we can say -- without assuming any liability -- that previous experience indicates (and recent market studies corroborate) that given the present condition of the marketplace, continuing with your present course of action is likely to result in substantial in

tyrannosaurus vex

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1138 on: July 13, 2017, 07:00:18 pm »
Evil and Unfeeling Arse-Flenser From The City of the Damned.

Brother Mythos

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Re: Weekly Science Headlines
« Reply #1139 on: July 17, 2017, 01:36:00 pm »
“Water bears will survive the end of the world as we know it”

As per the article, “These tough little buggers, also known as tardigrades, could keep calm and carry on until the sun boils Earth’s oceans away billions of years from now, according to a new study that examined water bears’ resistance to various astronomical disasters. This finding, published July 14 in Scientific Reports, suggests that complex life can be extremely difficult to destroy, which bodes well for anyone hoping Earthlings have cosmic company.”

Here’s the link: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/water-bears-will-survive-end-world-we-know-it?tgt=nr

The following link, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-05796-x, at the bottom of the original article provides more detail.

And here I had always been told the cockroaches would inherit the Earth.