Author Topic: So my uncle informs me  (Read 6318 times)

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: So my uncle informs me
« Reply #45 on: May 25, 2013, 04:54:11 pm »
BTW, my city also has a dam in imminent need of repair.
http://www.swg.usace.army.mil/Missions/DamSafetyProgram.aspx

Quote
Any dam safety issues at Addicks and Barker could have a far greater impact due to the magnitude of people and property downstream, as opposed to other dams around the country in rural or low-population density areas.

...Texas is rather prone to catastrophic weather events.
Then again, so is the Pacific coast, right?

I would be surprised if it didn't, given that most dams were build around 50 years ago and the lifespan for a dam is about 50 years.

The Pacific Coast is, perhaps oddly, not prone to catastrophic weather events at all. In fact, it is downright motherfucking placid. It is, however, prone to the occasional high winds, earthquake, volcano, or tsunami.

Even the rain is different there, it's SOFT. I couldn't believe the flowers that grow there.

Ours comes down like a cow pissing on a flat rock with flash floods and power outages and wind knocking down trees and lightning hitting all kinds of shit. Then the sun comes out, the steam rises from the cement and no more rain until winter, hot hot hot everything dies.

The thing that's amazing is that people LIVE THERE. Why? :?

See, if I designed a species, they just wouldn't bother living places that suck. They've leave Texas to the rattlesnakes and whatever other deadly things like to live in deserts.

My Darwin money is on the fire ants for now, but we might have a new contender.

I do tend to see a lot more population density in places that are semi-habitable, like the east coast. The Pacific coast is really nice too, not sure why it's not packed there.

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Re: So my uncle informs me
« Reply #46 on: May 25, 2013, 05:38:52 pm »
BTW, my city also has a dam in imminent need of repair.
http://www.swg.usace.army.mil/Missions/DamSafetyProgram.aspx

Quote
Any dam safety issues at Addicks and Barker could have a far greater impact due to the magnitude of people and property downstream, as opposed to other dams around the country in rural or low-population density areas.

...Texas is rather prone to catastrophic weather events.
Then again, so is the Pacific coast, right?

I would be surprised if it didn't, given that most dams were build around 50 years ago and the lifespan for a dam is about 50 years.

The Pacific Coast is, perhaps oddly, not prone to catastrophic weather events at all. In fact, it is downright motherfucking placid. It is, however, prone to the occasional high winds, earthquake, volcano, or tsunami.

Even the rain is different there, it's SOFT. I couldn't believe the flowers that grow there.

Ours comes down like a cow pissing on a flat rock with flash floods and power outages and wind knocking down trees and lightning hitting all kinds of shit. Then the sun comes out, the steam rises from the cement and no more rain until winter, hot hot hot everything dies.

The thing that's amazing is that people LIVE THERE. Why? :?

See, if I designed a species, they just wouldn't bother living places that suck. They've leave Texas to the rattlesnakes and whatever other deadly things like to live in deserts.

Because the property and costs of living are very cheap in relative terms?  :fap: :fap: :fap:

Perhaps a parallel with living in the city vs. commuting? I do that.
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Re: So my uncle informs me
« Reply #47 on: May 25, 2013, 06:27:25 pm »
BTW, my city also has a dam in imminent need of repair.
http://www.swg.usace.army.mil/Missions/DamSafetyProgram.aspx

Quote
Any dam safety issues at Addicks and Barker could have a far greater impact due to the magnitude of people and property downstream, as opposed to other dams around the country in rural or low-population density areas.

...Texas is rather prone to catastrophic weather events.
Then again, so is the Pacific coast, right?

I would be surprised if it didn't, given that most dams were build around 50 years ago and the lifespan for a dam is about 50 years.

The Pacific Coast is, perhaps oddly, not prone to catastrophic weather events at all. In fact, it is downright motherfucking placid. It is, however, prone to the occasional high winds, earthquake, volcano, or tsunami.

Even the rain is different there, it's SOFT. I couldn't believe the flowers that grow there.

Ours comes down like a cow pissing on a flat rock with flash floods and power outages and wind knocking down trees and lightning hitting all kinds of shit. Then the sun comes out, the steam rises from the cement and no more rain until winter, hot hot hot everything dies.

The thing that's amazing is that people LIVE THERE. Why? :?

See, if I designed a species, they just wouldn't bother living places that suck. They've leave Texas to the rattlesnakes and whatever other deadly things like to live in deserts.

My Darwin money is on the fire ants for now, but we might have a new contender.

I do tend to see a lot more population density in places that are semi-habitable, like the east coast. The Pacific coast is really nice too, not sure why it's not packed there.

Old Weird Ben.

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Re: So my uncle informs me
« Reply #48 on: May 25, 2013, 08:52:43 pm »
BTW, my city also has a dam in imminent need of repair.
http://www.swg.usace.army.mil/Missions/DamSafetyProgram.aspx

Quote
Any dam safety issues at Addicks and Barker could have a far greater impact due to the magnitude of people and property downstream, as opposed to other dams around the country in rural or low-population density areas.

...Texas is rather prone to catastrophic weather events.
Then again, so is the Pacific coast, right?

I would be surprised if it didn't, given that most dams were build around 50 years ago and the lifespan for a dam is about 50 years.

The Pacific Coast is, perhaps oddly, not prone to catastrophic weather events at all. In fact, it is downright motherfucking placid. It is, however, prone to the occasional high winds, earthquake, volcano, or tsunami.

Even the rain is different there, it's SOFT. I couldn't believe the flowers that grow there.

Ours comes down like a cow pissing on a flat rock with flash floods and power outages and wind knocking down trees and lightning hitting all kinds of shit. Then the sun comes out, the steam rises from the cement and no more rain until winter, hot hot hot everything dies.

The thing that's amazing is that people LIVE THERE. Why? :?

See, if I designed a species, they just wouldn't bother living places that suck. They've leave Texas to the rattlesnakes and whatever other deadly things like to live in deserts.

Because the property and costs of living are very cheap in relative terms?  :fap: :fap: :fap:

Perhaps a parallel with living in the city vs. commuting? I do that.

I don't know how much your gas costs down there, but up here it's no longer cheaper to live in the suburbs and commute in most cases.

Also, I can understand living in Texas or Arizona before I'll EVER understand living in a goddamned suburb.
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Re: So my uncle informs me
« Reply #49 on: May 26, 2013, 12:50:20 am »
BTW, my city also has a dam in imminent need of repair.
http://www.swg.usace.army.mil/Missions/DamSafetyProgram.aspx

Quote
Any dam safety issues at Addicks and Barker could have a far greater impact due to the magnitude of people and property downstream, as opposed to other dams around the country in rural or low-population density areas.

...Texas is rather prone to catastrophic weather events.
Then again, so is the Pacific coast, right?

I would be surprised if it didn't, given that most dams were build around 50 years ago and the lifespan for a dam is about 50 years.

The Pacific Coast is, perhaps oddly, not prone to catastrophic weather events at all. In fact, it is downright motherfucking placid. It is, however, prone to the occasional high winds, earthquake, volcano, or tsunami.

Even the rain is different there, it's SOFT. I couldn't believe the flowers that grow there.

Ours comes down like a cow pissing on a flat rock with flash floods and power outages and wind knocking down trees and lightning hitting all kinds of shit. Then the sun comes out, the steam rises from the cement and no more rain until winter, hot hot hot everything dies.

The thing that's amazing is that people LIVE THERE. Why? :?

See, if I designed a species, they just wouldn't bother living places that suck. They've leave Texas to the rattlesnakes and whatever other deadly things like to live in deserts.

Because the property and costs of living are very cheap in relative terms?  :fap: :fap: :fap:

Perhaps a parallel with living in the city vs. commuting? I do that.

I don't know how much your gas costs down there, but up here it's no longer cheaper to live in the suburbs and commute in most cases.

Also, I can understand living in Texas or Arizona before I'll EVER understand living in a goddamned suburb.

Well, the gas factor only applies in a city vs. suburb commuting scenario, which is valid: the only reason it pays off for me is because my work only requires my presence twice a week to present my work in the context of some meetings or support other members of the team. So if I had to be present, gas vs. rent maths wouldn't indeed work out.

Now, the other scenario involves the cost of land: how much does a square meter of property is valued in California in average vs. say, Nevada? I dont think it even matters how much it costs now, because what I'm implying is that at some point, a lowly populated area had cheaper land costs and thats when people thought "oh, thats a cheap strip of land where i can build a house and live" instead of living on the making rent threshold.
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Re: So my uncle informs me
« Reply #50 on: May 26, 2013, 04:19:18 am »
BTW, my city also has a dam in imminent need of repair.
http://www.swg.usace.army.mil/Missions/DamSafetyProgram.aspx

Quote
Any dam safety issues at Addicks and Barker could have a far greater impact due to the magnitude of people and property downstream, as opposed to other dams around the country in rural or low-population density areas.

...Texas is rather prone to catastrophic weather events.
Then again, so is the Pacific coast, right?

I would be surprised if it didn't, given that most dams were build around 50 years ago and the lifespan for a dam is about 50 years.

The Pacific Coast is, perhaps oddly, not prone to catastrophic weather events at all. In fact, it is downright motherfucking placid. It is, however, prone to the occasional high winds, earthquake, volcano, or tsunami.

Even the rain is different there, it's SOFT. I couldn't believe the flowers that grow there.

Ours comes down like a cow pissing on a flat rock with flash floods and power outages and wind knocking down trees and lightning hitting all kinds of shit. Then the sun comes out, the steam rises from the cement and no more rain until winter, hot hot hot everything dies.

The thing that's amazing is that people LIVE THERE. Why? :?

See, if I designed a species, they just wouldn't bother living places that suck. They've leave Texas to the rattlesnakes and whatever other deadly things like to live in deserts.

West Texas is like that, except for the rain part, mostly.
Where I live could best be described as somewhat swampy.
 Except when it's droughty.  Or flooding.
We get either too much rain or too much sun or too much heat, and maybe the occasional mild tornado.
I stay here because I can get a job here, something not guaranteed if I lived somewhere else.
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Re: So my uncle informs me
« Reply #51 on: May 26, 2013, 04:39:32 am »
BTW, my city also has a dam in imminent need of repair.
http://www.swg.usace.army.mil/Missions/DamSafetyProgram.aspx

Quote
Any dam safety issues at Addicks and Barker could have a far greater impact due to the magnitude of people and property downstream, as opposed to other dams around the country in rural or low-population density areas.

...Texas is rather prone to catastrophic weather events.
Then again, so is the Pacific coast, right?

I would be surprised if it didn't, given that most dams were build around 50 years ago and the lifespan for a dam is about 50 years.

The Pacific Coast is, perhaps oddly, not prone to catastrophic weather events at all. In fact, it is downright motherfucking placid. It is, however, prone to the occasional high winds, earthquake, volcano, or tsunami.

Even the rain is different there, it's SOFT. I couldn't believe the flowers that grow there.

Ours comes down like a cow pissing on a flat rock with flash floods and power outages and wind knocking down trees and lightning hitting all kinds of shit. Then the sun comes out, the steam rises from the cement and no more rain until winter, hot hot hot everything dies.

The thing that's amazing is that people LIVE THERE. Why? :?

See, if I designed a species, they just wouldn't bother living places that suck. They've leave Texas to the rattlesnakes and whatever other deadly things like to live in deserts.

West Texas is like that, except for the rain part, mostly.
Where I live could best be described as somewhat swampy.
 Except when it's droughty.  Or flooding.
We get either too much rain or too much sun or too much heat, and maybe the occasional mild tornado.
I stay here because I can get a job here, something not guaranteed if I lived somewhere else.

The further east of San Antonio, the more it turns into tropical bloodweeds and vines and giant insects and snakes hanging out of trees and shit.
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Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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Re: So my uncle informs me
« Reply #52 on: May 26, 2013, 04:58:00 am »
BTW, my city also has a dam in imminent need of repair.
http://www.swg.usace.army.mil/Missions/DamSafetyProgram.aspx

Quote
Any dam safety issues at Addicks and Barker could have a far greater impact due to the magnitude of people and property downstream, as opposed to other dams around the country in rural or low-population density areas.

...Texas is rather prone to catastrophic weather events.
Then again, so is the Pacific coast, right?

I would be surprised if it didn't, given that most dams were build around 50 years ago and the lifespan for a dam is about 50 years.

The Pacific Coast is, perhaps oddly, not prone to catastrophic weather events at all. In fact, it is downright motherfucking placid. It is, however, prone to the occasional high winds, earthquake, volcano, or tsunami.

Even the rain is different there, it's SOFT. I couldn't believe the flowers that grow there.

Ours comes down like a cow pissing on a flat rock with flash floods and power outages and wind knocking down trees and lightning hitting all kinds of shit. Then the sun comes out, the steam rises from the cement and no more rain until winter, hot hot hot everything dies.

The thing that's amazing is that people LIVE THERE. Why? :?

See, if I designed a species, they just wouldn't bother living places that suck. They've leave Texas to the rattlesnakes and whatever other deadly things like to live in deserts.

Because the property and costs of living are very cheap in relative terms?  :fap: :fap: :fap:

Perhaps a parallel with living in the city vs. commuting? I do that.

I don't know how much your gas costs down there, but up here it's no longer cheaper to live in the suburbs and commute in most cases.

Also, I can understand living in Texas or Arizona before I'll EVER understand living in a goddamned suburb.

Well, the gas factor only applies in a city vs. suburb commuting scenario, which is valid: the only reason it pays off for me is because my work only requires my presence twice a week to present my work in the context of some meetings or support other members of the team. So if I had to be present, gas vs. rent maths wouldn't indeed work out.

Now, the other scenario involves the cost of land: how much does a square meter of property is valued in California in average vs. say, Nevada? I dont think it even matters how much it costs now, because what I'm implying is that at some point, a lowly populated area had cheaper land costs and thats when people thought "oh, thats a cheap strip of land where i can build a house and live" instead of living on the making rent threshold.

I'm thinking pre-rent. When people came across a stretch of hostile desert and said, "yeah, this works for me".
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”


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Re: So my uncle informs me
« Reply #53 on: May 26, 2013, 07:33:34 am »

I'm thinking pre-rent. When people came across a stretch of hostile desert and said, "yeah, this works for me".

...Making a pile of rocks and calling it home...eating rattlesnakes, picking prickly-pear spines out of their ass in the evenings...having coyotes fight over your poo and the cancer make blue blobs all over your face...Yeah...romantic...

I have said that I would happily move somewhere where I never had to experience having to fish my boots out of the mud after they got sucked off my feet, and where the cockroaches don't nearly warrant FAA regulation.

The further east of San Antonio, the more it turns into tropical bloodweeds and vines and giant insects and snakes hanging out of trees and shit.

Alligators.   
I have got within 10 feet of a torpid 'gator that was bigger than myself.
It didn't eat me.
 I assume because it knew I was too full of crap.

Also gotten off topic, what the hell was I talking about?
Dam, I think I forgot.  We were taking it to the bridge...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ajzpd-ONOdo

Also, I can understand living in Texas or Arizona before I'll EVER understand living in a goddamned suburb.

I hate the suburbs too, but I have to get my shit more positively TOGETHER in a nice hard cash sort of way before I can turn down living with no rent. 
 At least I'm only driving to work 4 days a week now, and then once I get the motorbike running and learn to ride it, things will be MUCH better.
Hope was the thing with feathers.
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