Author Topic: Algorithmic Transparency  (Read 527 times)

Doktor Howl

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Re: Algorithmic Transparency
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2020, 05:37:47 pm »
Done.
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The Johnny

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Re: Algorithmic Transparency
« Reply #16 on: September 14, 2020, 11:11:46 pm »
"A sheriff launched an algorithm to predict who might commit a crime. Dozens of people said they were harassed by deputies for no reason."

https://www.businessinsider.com/predictive-policing-algorithm-monitors-harasses-families-report-2020-9

Quote
But according to a six-month investigation published this week by the Tampa Bay Times, the high-tech tool deployed by the Pasco Sheriff's Office didn't lead to a reduction in violent crime — instead, 21 families singled out by the algorithm said they were routinely harassed by deputies, even when there was no evidence of a specific crime.

In September 2019, deputies showed up at 15-year-old Rio Wojtecki's door because the algorithm had determined Rio was one of the county's "Top 5" at risk of committing more crimes, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

Before that, Rio had been arrested only one time, a year prior, and was charged with sneaking into a carport and stealing motorized bicycles. Rio had already been assigned a juvenile probation officer — but because of the algorithm, police showed up at Rio's house to question him at least 21 times, beginning with that September visit, Rio's mother told the Tampa Bay Times.

Quote
People's criminal records — including charges that were later dropped — were fed into the algorithm to determine potential future offenders. Former employees of the sheriff's office said deputies were instructed to visit the homes of people the algorithm selected, charge them with zoning violations, and make arrests for any reason they could. Those violations and arrests were then fed back into the algorithm, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

Thats like the movie Minority Report... there was another one involving with an artificial intelligence "Sphynx" that was similar, wish i could remember.
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minuspace

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Re: Algorithmic Transparency
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2020, 05:16:14 pm »

"A sheriff launched an algorithm to predict who might commit a crime. Dozens of people said they were harassed by deputies for no reason."

https://www.businessinsider.com/predictive-policing-algorithm-monitors-harasses-families-report-2020-9

Quote
But according to a six-month investigation published this week by the Tampa Bay Times, the high-tech tool deployed by the Pasco Sheriff's Office didn't lead to a reduction in violent crime — instead, 21 families singled out by the algorithm said they were routinely harassed by deputies, even when there was no evidence of a specific crime.

In September 2019, deputies showed up at 15-year-old Rio Wojtecki's door because the algorithm had determined Rio was one of the county's "Top 5" at risk of committing more crimes, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

Before that, Rio had been arrested only one time, a year prior, and was charged with sneaking into a carport and stealing motorized bicycles. Rio had already been assigned a juvenile probation officer — but because of the algorithm, police showed up at Rio's house to question him at least 21 times, beginning with that September visit, Rio's mother told the Tampa Bay Times.

Quote
People's criminal records — including charges that were later dropped — were fed into the algorithm to determine potential future offenders. Former employees of the sheriff's office said deputies were instructed to visit the homes of people the algorithm selected, charge them with zoning violations, and make arrests for any reason they could. Those violations and arrests were then fed back into the algorithm, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

Thats like the movie Minority Report... there was another one involving with an artificial intelligence "Sphynx" that was similar, wish i could remember.

Cursory search turns up “Cyborg 009” as an anime/manga with Sphinx AI.


Re: quoted text— fucking carports, always the obligatory enhancement to what would have been a simple theft.

minuspace

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Re: Algorithmic Transparency
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2020, 05:58:47 pm »