Author Topic: Zen and the art of...  (Read 1139 times)

Lord Batwing Candlewaxxe

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Zen and the art of...
« on: April 24, 2021, 08:30:51 pm »
Just a short snippet from a book I'm working on, entitled Zen and the Art of Riding the Bus:

In my town, there is a Scottish Zen monk who dresses all in robes of tartan plaid; unlike the yellow-orange robes the other monks wear.  When asked why, he invariably responds, "Is the Buddha only to be found in saffron, or may he inhabit the thistle as well?"
“You know those days when things keep getting worse faster than you can lower your standards?" - Carrie Fisher


Perhaps the damned horse can fly.

Doktor Howl

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Re: Zen and the art of...
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2021, 05:29:32 am »
Just a short snippet from a book I'm working on, entitled Zen and the Art of Riding the Bus:

In my town, there is a Scottish Zen monk who dresses all in robes of tartan plaid; unlike the yellow-orange robes the other monks wear.  When asked why, he invariably responds, "Is the Buddha only to be found in saffron, or may he inhabit the thistle as well?"

Is he the cool kind of Buddhist who whacks people with sticks, or just the regular kind?
Molon Lube

Lord Batwing Candlewaxxe

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Re: Zen and the art of...
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2021, 06:06:11 pm »
Just a short snippet from a book I'm working on, entitled Zen and the Art of Riding the Bus:

In my town, there is a Scottish Zen monk who dresses all in robes of tartan plaid; unlike the yellow-orange robes the other monks wear.  When asked why, he invariably responds, "Is the Buddha only to be found in saffron, or may he inhabit the thistle as well?"

Is he the cool kind of Buddhist who whacks people with sticks, or just the regular kind?

That depends on how stereotypical he feels at any particular time.
“You know those days when things keep getting worse faster than you can lower your standards?" - Carrie Fisher


Perhaps the damned horse can fly.

Lord Batwing Candlewaxxe

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Re: Zen and the art of...
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2021, 12:54:47 am »
Another excerpt, rather longer this time:

When I arrived to commune with the Master, as I do most evenings, I was in an agitated state. I had had a frustrating day, with many things I could not get out of my head. Problems at work, problems at home, problems within myself. I was unable to achieve the calmness needed for meditation.

The Master noticed this, and spoke to me. After a few pleasantries, I informed him of my difficulties and asked his advice. He responded by telling me the following parable:

"Consider the bus," the Master began. "People get on the bus, and people get off the bus. Some stay on for a short time, some for a long time. Some people ride quietly and passively, some noisily but harmlessly, and some cause trouble for other riders or the driver. But the bus keeps moving in its assigned path. It starts in one place, and stops in another; no matter how many people get on or off. People get on, and get off, but they do not normally stay on the bus beyond what is necessary to bring them to their desired destination. They do not stay on the bus forever"

"I'm not sure I understand" I replied, slightly confused. Do you mean that I should be like the bus? That my thoughts and frustrations are like the people that get on and off? That I should only think on these things when necessary, but not dwell on them; and then forget them when they're no longer important? But how will I know when is long enough, and when is too long or too early?"

"Consider again the bus," intoned the Master. It travels its path over and over, around in an endlessly repeating circle, never changing. Each bus has its own path, and never travels the path of another. But each person has his own destination. No bus can take every person to every destination. Each bus can only reach destinations along its own path. Some people can reach theirs by means of one bus, others require more than one. Some need only change busses a few times along their path, some require many transfers. Some can change busses immediately upon reaching their transfer point. Others must wait for their next bus to arrive; some for a long time, others a shorter time." Still others must walk a distance between busses to continue on their way. A rider only stays on the bus as long as is necessary. If they stay on too long, they miss their destination and must backtrack. If they get off too early, then they must wait for the next bus, no matter how long it takes; or travel the rest of the distance on foot. If they take the wrong bus, they can get lost."

"I'm still confused." I replied. "Do you mean that I should be like the person riding the bus? That if I follow one direction of thought to long, I'll end up going in circles; but should instead follow it while it is useful, and only as long as it's useful? And when it is no longer useful, I should find a new direction to point my thoughts, no matter how long it takes, or how far I have to go to find it? And how will I know which is the right direction, and which is the wrong one.?

The Master simply said, as he had so many times before and since, "Meditate to find the wisdom."

"But Master," I responded, somewhat distraught, "I do not understand what I should meditate upon! What is the most important thing in what you've taught me?"

"What is most important," replied the Master, "is to have your fare ready, and to use exact change."
“You know those days when things keep getting worse faster than you can lower your standards?" - Carrie Fisher


Perhaps the damned horse can fly.

rong

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Re: Zen and the art of...
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2021, 02:45:08 pm »
This reminds me of the wheels going round and round
"he was a smart feller who felt smart"