Principia Discordia

Principia Discordia => Techmology and Scientism => Topic started by: Disco Pickle on September 15, 2010, 08:03:49 pm

Title: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on September 15, 2010, 08:03:49 pm
Found a thread about this from back in 08, thought It'd be a good idea to bring it up again as new developments have made this the coolest god damn thing since Fonzi.

And it's a subject near and dear to my heart as I'm already well versed in the sort of software you would use in tandem with these machines.

First, the NYTimes article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/14/technology/14print.html?pagewanted=2&ref=homepage&src=me

Seriously, build a fucking HOUSE with a giant 3d printer?  I'm loving the implications.. 

and, in a lovely bit of synchronicity, as I was doing my morning do here at the office, one of the other engineers had left the latest tech briefs mag to read.  It contained this article:

http://www.techbriefs.com/component/content/article/8458

When the price of this tech comes down just a bit more, I'm thinking about forking for one and taking up custom EVERYTHING design.

Think about it:

1. No warehouse to house inventory.
2. No wasted material building things no one will buy.
3. No space at all needed except server space to showcase example 3d   
    models and photos of real creations.  and for the machine, of course,
    and the raw additive material.  But really, that's hardly too much to ask.
4. With 3D scanning technology, you can easily reverse engineer something
    and recreate it.

I'd eventually want to get into Metal work, and the technology for this has really advanced.

a company called Ex One has a patent on a hardening system, but I guess it's not the only way, as this video was done by another company.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9VOwqtOglg

and here's Ex One's site.

http://www.exone.com/eng/technology/x1-prometal/process_prometal.html

I am loving the direction this tech has gone.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on September 15, 2010, 08:07:11 pm
I just accidentally my pance.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 15, 2010, 08:13:06 pm
a trade mag that i get that keeps up with stereo lith/rapid proto/3d printing stuff...
http://www.deskeng.com/home_rpm.html
tell them you're an engineer and get on their list...
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on September 15, 2010, 08:19:28 pm
a trade mag that i get that keeps up with stereo lith/rapid proto/3d printing stuff...
http://www.deskeng.com/home_rpm.html
tell them you're an engineer and get on their list...

Thanks for the link. 

I could hang a cinder block from the wood this tech gives me.   :fap:
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 15, 2010, 08:22:44 pm
if you had a desktop printer, you could print a cinderblock out right now, to hang from aforementioned wood.

also, there are pretty cheap ones available these days....
hell, there are open source homebrew plans on the intarwebs.
there's been a few threads about this technology before.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on September 15, 2010, 08:48:17 pm
If I had a 3D printer, I'd design something so much cooler than a cinder block to hang from my wang.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on September 15, 2010, 09:01:33 pm
If I had a 3D printer, I'd design something so much cooler than a cinder block to hang from my wang.

Small refrigerator or a fan, maybe?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 15, 2010, 09:09:18 pm
go for something hard to make in traditional ways.
a sierpinski pyramid, or something...
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on September 15, 2010, 09:20:02 pm
go for something hard to make in traditional ways.
a sierpinski pyramid, or something...


Not nearly as cool as my suggestions

:rimshot:
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 15, 2010, 09:23:56 pm
maybe i could print out a cast net so i could catch the incredibly obvious jokes that i've been missing lately.
 :oops:
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on September 15, 2010, 10:10:43 pm
If I had a 3D printer, I'd design something so much cooler than a cinder block to hang from my wang.

Small refrigerator or a fan, maybe?

I don't think anything will cool these boys off once I get my hands on one.

If this tech could go global mainstream with heavy subsidies to fund R&D and drive down prices to consumer levels, I see a possible revolution in do it yourself manufacturing. 

we could come a create-it-yourself planet. 

ok, maybe not EVERYTHING, but damn if the human cost in labor to create things would go way down, and we might get creative juices flowing at a global level. 

We become little gods of a sort, where whatever we think of and model in a virtual 3D environment, can be created from a bag of metal, plastic, or concrete dust in under 24 hours.

maybe a little too eutopia, but damn if it doesn't look nice from back here in the present.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on September 15, 2010, 10:17:43 pm
next step would be recycling of the crap produced back into the raw materials.

Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on September 15, 2010, 10:20:43 pm
If I had a 3D printer, I'd design something so much cooler than a cinder block to hang from my wang.

Small refrigerator or a fan, maybe?

I don't think anything will cool these boys off once I get my hands on one.

If this tech could go global mainstream with heavy subsidies to fund R&D and drive down prices to consumer levels, I see a possible revolution in do it yourself manufacturing. 

we could come a create-it-yourself planet. 

ok, maybe not EVERYTHING, but damn if the human cost in labor to create things would go way down, and we might get creative juices flowing at a global level. 

We become little gods of a sort, where whatever we think of and model in a virtual 3D environment, can be created from a bag of metal, plastic, or concrete dust in under 24 hours.

maybe a little too eutopia, but damn if it doesn't look nice from back here in the present.

Prediction:

The first mass produced Do It Yourself Home Manufacturing items will be sex toys. The second will be marijuana smoking implements. The third will be a 3d image that looks like one thing but when you actually print it it will be a 3d model of Rick Astley.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on September 15, 2010, 10:43:55 pm
If I had a 3D printer, I'd design something so much cooler than a cinder block to hang from my wang.

Small refrigerator or a fan, maybe?

I don't think anything will cool these boys off once I get my hands on one.

If this tech could go global mainstream with heavy subsidies to fund R&D and drive down prices to consumer levels, I see a possible revolution in do it yourself manufacturing. 

we could come a create-it-yourself planet. 

ok, maybe not EVERYTHING, but damn if the human cost in labor to create things would go way down, and we might get creative juices flowing at a global level. 

We become little gods of a sort, where whatever we think of and model in a virtual 3D environment, can be created from a bag of metal, plastic, or concrete dust in under 24 hours.

maybe a little too eutopia, but damn if it doesn't look nice from back here in the present.

Prediction:

The first mass produced Do It Yourself Home Manufacturing items will be sex toys. The second will be marijuana smoking implements. The third will be a 3d image that looks like one thing but when you actually print it it will be a 3d model of Rick Astley.

are you a fucking long distance mind reader?  I was having this EXACT conversation with my lady friend on the ride home from work.  She said she'd want a 12" black dildo if I started making them on the fly and on demand.  I fuckin love this girl's humor.

major innovations in tech almost always seem to originate in the porn industry.  never underestimate the power of people's need for an orgasm.

the Rick Astley shit made me choke on my beer. 
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on September 15, 2010, 10:47:12 pm
If I had a 3D printer, I'd design something so much cooler than a cinder block to hang from my wang.

Small refrigerator or a fan, maybe?

I don't think anything will cool these boys off once I get my hands on one.

If this tech could go global mainstream with heavy subsidies to fund R&D and drive down prices to consumer levels, I see a possible revolution in do it yourself manufacturing. 

we could come a create-it-yourself planet. 

ok, maybe not EVERYTHING, but damn if the human cost in labor to create things would go way down, and we might get creative juices flowing at a global level. 

We become little gods of a sort, where whatever we think of and model in a virtual 3D environment, can be created from a bag of metal, plastic, or concrete dust in under 24 hours.

maybe a little too eutopia, but damn if it doesn't look nice from back here in the present.

Prediction:

The first mass produced Do It Yourself Home Manufacturing items will be sex toys. The second will be marijuana smoking implements. The third will be a 3d image that looks like one thing but when you actually print it it will be a 3d model of Rick Astley.

are you a fucking long distance mind reader?  I was having this EXACT conversation with my lady friend on the ride home from work.  She said she'd want a 12" black dildo if I started making them on the fly and on demand.  I fuckin love this girl's humor.

major innovations in tech almost always seem to originate in the porn industry.  never underestimate the power of people's need for an orgasm.

the Rick Astley shit made me choke on my beer. 

 :thanks:

I just saw Youporn is now advertising 3d porn videos on the net...
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on September 16, 2010, 03:20:43 pm
 :lulz: Ratatosk is totally right. Sex, then illegal / dangerous stuff, then finally we might get something useful in everyday life.

Do you think we'll see affordable consumer-level 3D printing in our lifetimes? and if so, what's the most far-out thing that consumer level 3D printing will be capable of?


Will we reach a point where it's like, instead of going shopping, you just download a 3D printer file and whip out some new dinnerwear?

How crazy can 3D printing get? Can I only make things which can be made out of one material? Or in the future, will I be able to print myself an EARL GREY, HOT?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on September 16, 2010, 05:29:40 pm
:lulz: Ratatosk is totally right. Sex, then illegal / dangerous stuff, then finally we might get something useful in everyday life.

Do you think we'll see affordable consumer-level 3D printing in our lifetimes? and if so, what's the most far-out thing that consumer level 3D printing will be capable of?


Will we reach a point where it's like, instead of going shopping, you just download a 3D printer file and whip out some new dinnerwear?

How crazy can 3D printing get? Can I only make things which can be made out of one material? Or in the future, will I be able to print myself an EARL GREY, HOT?

Well the rep-rap machines are already consumer level... as long as you're willing to hack a bit. And HP has repeased a purchasable version that requires no hardware/software hacking.

The next version of RepRap is being designed to be able to manufacture all parts of itself except the circuit boards.

So I think we're at the point where you could print a cup and then put tea in it (or have some kind of automated teapot do the tea bit).
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Jasper on September 16, 2010, 05:49:30 pm
I'm hoping for a building material that is durable and safe to eat off of.  I would basically just use it to come up with elaborate dining sets. 

WOULD YOU LIKE AN 80 OZ STEIN, MADAM?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on September 16, 2010, 05:52:57 pm
I look forward to the day that I can finish my beer and then guiltlessly smash the stein on the floor.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Jasper on September 16, 2010, 05:57:45 pm
Ooh.

I am foreseeing parties where everyone fabs their own custom drink cups and costumes.

Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on September 16, 2010, 06:13:25 pm
http://reprap.org/mediawiki/images/0/06/Cup.g (http://reprap.org/mediawiki/images/0/06/Cup.g)

G-Code for a small Coffee Mug.

(http://reprap.org/mediawiki/images/thumb/3/36/090210_didacta_02.jpg/600px-090210_didacta_02.jpg)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on September 16, 2010, 09:07:06 pm
That code is so...ugly.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on September 16, 2010, 09:35:00 pm
That code is so...ugly.

Kinda like the cup ;-)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on September 16, 2010, 09:36:33 pm
still. somebody clone me a rip rap or whatever you call this thing. I promise to use it for evil.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on September 16, 2010, 10:08:38 pm
still. somebody clone me a rip rap or whatever you call this thing. I promise to use it for evil.

me too..   

GOD..      :evilmad:   so much evil..
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Nephew Twiddleton on September 16, 2010, 10:10:43 pm
Just coming into this thread. I'm going to have to read more on this topic. I had heard of it a while back and promptly forgot about it.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on September 17, 2010, 12:48:18 am
That code is so...ugly.


G-code isn't meant to be read. It's roughly the equivalent of assembly language for CNC devices.

It's the output of a CAM program, which is sort of like a compiler for a CAD file.

Not really, but sort of.

Kinda.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Jasper on September 17, 2010, 01:14:25 am
What 3D printing needs to explode is a design GUI with 3D haptic input.  So you can sculpt models by hand, in a virtual setting.

Just saying.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 17, 2010, 01:31:43 am
I'm Attending the newly formed Dallas hackerspace, and there's a guy with a makerbot...
(http://i517.photobucket.com/albums/u337/mtdozier/2520a0c8.jpg)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on September 17, 2010, 03:43:49 am
That code is so...ugly.


G-code isn't meant to be read. It's roughly the equivalent of assembly language for CNC devices.

It's the output of a CAM program, which is sort of like a compiler for a CAD file.

Not really, but sort of.

Kinda.

I know. I just forgot how ugly stuff that a machine spits out can be.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cain on September 17, 2010, 02:34:59 pm
3D printers are the shit.  They're kind of the real world equivalent of what Terry Pratchett said about dwarf tools in one of the Discworld books.

"All a dwarf needed was a hammer, a forge and raw materials.  With that, a dwarf could make complex tools.  And with complex tools, a dwarf could make anything."

John Robb (http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/) was who I first heard of 3D printers from, and if he's even halfway right, the implications for these are nothing short of incredible.  Make them affordable and you're going to have a manufacturing DIY revolution.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on September 17, 2010, 02:58:45 pm
Is open source and the public domain bad for the economy?

I don't think so, but this argument is coming, isn't it?

Once this thing starts to pick up, I have a feeling that manufacturing companies are going to shit themselves. And they're going to do their best to frame this as a sort of antisocial, economically destructive behavior. They don't WANT you to be self reliant, they want your wallet plugged into the machine, no?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cain on September 17, 2010, 03:07:34 pm
Everyone is going to shit themselves.

Imagine what would happen if a template for, say, the latest Reebok trainers was put on the internet, in a world where 3D printers are affordable and in most homes.  It'd make movie and music piracy look like a drop in the ocean, compared to the coming flood.  The only people who are probably happy about this are the ones who own the raw material and resources necessary to make the stuff.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on September 17, 2010, 03:11:30 pm
this makes me so excited.

i was going to post, "it's too bad you can't just 3D print an entire book", and then I facepalmed and realized that there are already 2D printers for that.  :lol:


Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on September 17, 2010, 03:12:55 pm
Everyone is going to shit themselves.

Imagine what would happen if a template for, say, the latest Reebok trainers was put on the internet, in a world where 3D printers are affordable and in most homes.  It'd make movie and music piracy look like a drop in the ocean, compared to the coming flood.  The only people who are probably happy about this are the ones who own the raw material and resources necessary to make the stuff.

exactly, the manufacturing companies that want to survive will have to move toward creating of raw materials, or proprietary designs and code that works with machines THEY manufacture.  Like video games, they sell you the code for your product you want to create and license it for only so many runs before the machine rejects the code.

Of course, this wont stop the open source guys, but you'll probably find your higher quality products and materials making someone a nice profit if they can get into it early.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cain on September 17, 2010, 03:20:26 pm
Yeah, early adopters generally do best, even with systems like this one.  I believe there was a study done recently which showed that music companies would've actually probably made a slight profit if they had bothered to take up a proposal from Napster, instead of shutting it down.  And of course, when Napster went down...well, it's like when an organized crime group is removed from a system.  Small networks split off from the main one and go underground and become nearly impossible to track, until they blossom into giant networks.  Like The Pirate Bay.  I can see the same kind of scenario playing itself out here, because all the available evidence suggests in the past 10 years the people in charge of enforcing copyright laws have not learnt much, and in fact have regressed in some ways.

Personally I'd be looking for the Open Source produced stuff, as with my computer I have no problem with 99% of open source software out there (a word processor on a par with Word 2007 would be nice though.  Open Office just doesn't cut it).  But as the current market shows, there is plenty of space for open source and licenced products, definitely.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on September 17, 2010, 03:47:13 pm
Is open source and the public domain bad for the economy?

I don't think so, but this argument is coming, isn't it?

Once this thing starts to pick up, I have a feeling that manufacturing companies are going to shit themselves. And they're going to do their best to frame this as a sort of antisocial, economically destructive behavior. They don't WANT you to be self reliant, they want your wallet plugged into the machine, no?

Yes they will and yes they do.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Jasper on September 17, 2010, 09:39:23 pm
Cain:  Tried KWord?  It is pretty okay.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cain on September 17, 2010, 11:26:49 pm
I haven't, but I'll give it a go, thanks.  I think the last time I looked at it was a couple of years ago and it was kinda dated, but I see now people are actively developing it again.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 18, 2010, 12:46:22 am
haven't seen this link here yet.:
http://www.thingiverse.com/

also, just so that it's clear... the materials used in this are pretty limited yet.
most of the 3d printing is done in ABS.  rigid plastic.
the guy at the hackerspace yesterday spent the evening trying to tune his machine to use ALS plastic, which is a corn based plastic (biodegradable transparent stuff... he had difficulties)

i think were still a good ways out from printing a shoe...

an example of what's immediately possible, is one of the fellows there had some Bose headsets that he likes, but a piece on them became broken.  they are apparently pretty pricey and he likes them, but Bose said they were unable to sell him a replacement part.  So he's going to model it up and have the fellow with the printer spit one out.  i wonder how that would go down in court if the component became available on the web.  and Bose bitched about it....
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Mesozoic Mister Nigel on September 18, 2010, 12:52:45 am
My daughter has some kind of small toy printed on one of those.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Requia ☣ on September 18, 2010, 09:14:20 pm
also, there are pretty cheap ones available these days....
hell, there are open source homebrew plans on the intarwebs.
there's been a few threads about this technology before.

Where, how much, and how much detail do they get?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on September 18, 2010, 09:35:04 pm
also, there are pretty cheap ones available these days....
hell, there are open source homebrew plans on the intarwebs.
there's been a few threads about this technology before.

Where, how much, and how much detail do they get?

according to the rep-rap site, it took them about $500.00 to build the first one, and it could replicate 30% of its own parts (maybe more, not watching it as I write this)

the next gen they're making to replicate something like 80%??  check the website. 

but really, after you build one, you can replicate it for whatever it costs in the plastic they use and the metal guide posts which I dont imagine will ever be very replicable, but are fairly cheap if you buy it buy a good stock of it, sell them to your friends or hobby types for 50 bux and you'll have your money back in no time.

it's new tech though, and I'd wait until someone designs one that can use material other than plastic without having to have factory floor space.

What would be awesome would be getting together a bunch of people who understand the tech and it's capabilities and them all going in on purchasing one of the higher tech ones, pooling for warehouse space, and sharing machine time making useful things from nothing but metal dust and plastic.

turn around and sell what you're making, be it custom or every day useful stuff, dump all of the profits for the first 5 years back into the company and purchase a new one every time you have the money for it and space.

eventually, everyone who invested has their own machine and is pumping out their own stuff for personal use and sale.

market flood eventually, yeah, but if you have a machine that can make almost anything you want from (hopefully) cheap raw material, it wouldn't matter really.

I'll put up the first $3000, who else is in?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on September 18, 2010, 09:38:28 pm
Make spookah god statues and sell them to smelly pagans. Instant market.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Requia ☣ on September 18, 2010, 09:44:37 pm
Plastic is all I really want (the kinds of things I want to make are things designed to be looked at, not to be functional), the bigger question is the kind of details the self kits can make.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 18, 2010, 09:48:38 pm
well, the hobbyist kits are pretty cheap (relatively).
they Makerbot that the fellow had at the hackerspace the other day cost him 750 for the basic kit.  he said that after buying the extra goodies and upgrades and ABS that he felt was necessary, he had a little under 2k into it, though.
It is my understanding that there are professional desktop units under 10k, and they are capable of making very nice pieces.  
my company has ordered some flight sticks, throttles, cyclics, etc. from a local rapid prototype company, and they were pretty damned slick.  they were smooth, with nice detail.  they were tough.  (i don't know how much they could really take, but you could bang them on the desk without worries, and we drop tested one that was a mess up in the model, and it didn't show any signs of damage)  My coworker who went to their facilities said they made ours on such a desktop unit, since we were only ordering one offs.  they had larger units that handled orders in the tens to hundreds.
their business cards were plastic printed.  (not really that practical since they were about 3/16 thick or so, but they made an impact in that you could read all the fine print and the logo looked nice.)  they had them in about 8 or 9 different materials with varying hardness/flexibility/opacity/etc....
after seeing this guy's hobbyist unit in motion, i'm intrigued.  i'll do some more digging and report back.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on September 18, 2010, 10:06:23 pm
The toughness of things made ia 3d printing can be controlled by how close the machine is told to make each pass.



Somewhere in a box in California is the shattered remains of my drink cup grabbing claw. Of which I no longer have the 3d model of. : :cry:
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 23, 2010, 04:05:31 pm
this one's pretty cheap for hobbyist use!:
http://pp3dp.com/index.php
its a little chinese desktop type with .3mm resolution.
$2990

entry level profesional model from Z Corporation:
http://www.zcorp.com/en/Products/3D-Printers/ZPrinter-150/spage.aspx
Zprinter 150 is going for $14.9k
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on September 23, 2010, 04:09:20 pm
Oh shit 3 grand. That is almost cheap enough for me.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Triple Zero on September 25, 2010, 07:13:01 pm
I haven't, but I'll give it a go, thanks.  I think the last time I looked at it was a couple of years ago and it was kinda dated, but I see now people are actively developing it again.

yeah it pays to revisit opensource software every now and again.

GIMP was pretty unusable when it started out as well, but is a really decent graphics package these days (not claiming it's on par with Photoshop though, but it can do most things very well).

Another opensource Word clone I tried a while ago was AbiWord. I wasn't very impressed at first, and it seems they're going the bloated OpenOffice route, but you never know, maybe they got better too. It's a much smaller download than OpenOffice, at least, which weighs about 100MB or so.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Triple Zero on September 27, 2010, 11:04:42 am
BROKAN AI IS BACK!!!! HI BAI!
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 27, 2010, 02:00:50 pm
Yayaya!  welcome back, BAI

Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Triple Zero on September 28, 2010, 07:59:17 pm
YOU CERTAINLY MEAN A MANNER MOST EXCELLENT

FEW PEOPLE HAVE FAILED WITH SUCH GRACE, SIR.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on November 04, 2010, 02:40:04 pm
god this looks like a really, really horrible shoop.

but the possibility it was real makes my pance about to 'splode.

http://gizmodo.com/5678476/the-worlds-first-3d+printed-car-actually-works
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on November 04, 2010, 02:49:58 pm
god this looks like a really, really horrible shoop.

but the possibility it was real makes my pance about to 'splode.

http://gizmodo.com/5678476/the-worlds-first-3d+printed-car-actually-works

WOW!
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on November 04, 2010, 06:14:06 pm
i wonder how much it cost them to make the car body that way.
and how much did the rest of the car cost ?
it says the part that was printed was the body and glass panels....  that makes me guess the car has a frame, not monocoque?  so it's really just a body kit that they printed, right?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on November 05, 2010, 02:58:46 pm
more rapid prototyping awesomeness.

You have to sign up to view, but it's not like you have to give them real info or anything.

http://www.fortus.com/stratasys.aspx?id=8088&utm_source=ADVE&utm_medium=DEGORDONMURRAYCHECKITOUT&utm_campaign=ADVEDEGORDONMURRAYCHECKITOUT
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on January 06, 2011, 09:33:06 pm
(http://bahbs.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/tea_earl_grey_picard_small.jpg)

The cats at Cornell are developing a FOOD PRINTER

http://io9.com/5717803/someday-you-will-be-able-to-print-your-own-dinner



not only that, the technology allows them to print food which couldn't actually be created by human hands!


from Cornell's page http://ccsl.mae.cornell.edu/node/194


Quote
Impact on Culinary Professionals: Fine Dining  

Fine dining chefs are continually developing new, innovative techniques and seeking the enabling technologies that will help them push the boundaries of culinary art. They innovate by harnessing non-traditional ingredients, such as hydrocolloids, and by employing new tools pulled straight from the scientific community; the result is “culinary magic” including flavored gelatin spheres with liquid centers, sauce foams, hot liquid deserts with flash frozen shells, syringe-extrudable meats, and much more. SFF promises to be the next important enabling technology in the fine dining realm. SFF delivers new possibilities by lending this faction of culinary artists one of SFF’s core capabilities: fabrication of multi-material objects with high geometric complexity. As the barriers fall (e.g., SFF machine prices have reduced nearly an order of magnitude in the last decade) and non-traditional ingredients gain credibility in the fine dining world (e.g., hydrocolloids), the question is not whether SFF will play an important role in the future of food, but rather, in what ways will it do so. Examples of potential future applications include cakes with complex, embedded 3D letters, such that upon slicing the cake, a message is revealed. Or, even a prime rib with a hidden message. Perhaps an on-demand, customizable menu in which the dish is prepared in any 3D shape that the diner desires: the diner can co-create with the culinary artist in real-time.

(http://ccsl.mae.cornell.edu/sites/default/files/091009%20French%20Culinary%20Institute%20187%20E22.jpg)

(http://ccsl.mae.cornell.edu/sites/default/files/Cut%202.JPG)

(http://ccsl.mae.cornell.edu/sites/default/files/091009%20French%20Culinary%20Institute%20191%20E23.jpg)



Raise your hand if you can't wait to pirate a cheeseburger.

Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Requia ☣ on January 06, 2011, 10:03:31 pm
Actually, that sounds kinda gross.  Though I expect the fast food industry will be thrilled to use them to lay off half their employees.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Rumckle on January 07, 2011, 05:21:45 am
I dunno, the liquid meat sounds gross, but some of the other stuff sounds awesome. The desserts you could make with that could be pretty kick ass.


ETA:
Though I expect the fast food industry will be thrilled to use them to lay off half their employees.

That's pretty optimistic, I'd expect the fast food industry to be mostly replaced by vending machines.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Requia ☣ on January 07, 2011, 07:37:20 am
Lobbying will ensure that little competition is seen from vending machines using this technology.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on January 07, 2011, 11:45:55 am
I've been wanting to build a gruel vending machine for a while now. I could do it too, if I had the money.

and the time.


and the space.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on January 07, 2011, 02:19:06 pm
Requia, you're so cynical! This technology allows you to simply print complex or expensive dishes without any culinary knowledge. The morbidly obese, who are currently sucking down quarter pounders at a terrifying rate, will be able to serve themselves a balanced meal with one button push. Your first reaction is that it's going to be bad, you are disgusted, and people are going to lose their jobs. You don't think this is cool as fuck?

Quote
Laypeople don’t have to know the first thing about musical notation, valve/key/fret fingering, or tonal theory to be able to utilize a stereo system to deliver a distilled version of a live musical performance directly into their home. Likewise, a layperson would not necessarily need to possess even basic culinary skills to employ an SFF system to create geometrically complex, multi-material food items. Culinary knowledge and artistic skill of world renowned chefs can be abstracted to a 3D fabrication file and then used by laypeople to reproduce famous chefs’ work in the home. Also, expert knowledge of the world’s leading nutritionists can be abstracted and encoded in 3D fabrication files to help laypeople eat more healthily, without necessarily having to learn healthy cooking techniques or even understand nutritional principles such as caloric intake and protein balance.

SFF systems could even go one step further, and deliver customized solutions (SFF’s core strength) to each user that incorporate the individualized nature of nutritional needs. For example, a layperson may soon be able to upload a report of their daily activity from a pedometer and digital food log, and the SFF system could use expert knowledge to print them a meal that fulfills their particular nutritional needs for the day. While experts can currently offer advice on how to balance a nutritional program, their influence falls short of delivering the end-to-end solution that only SFF system can provide: from personalized design through fabrication.

Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Triple Zero on January 07, 2011, 03:23:08 pm
Actually, that sounds kinda gross.  Though I expect the fast food industry will be thrilled to use them to lay off half their employees.

Fast food industry already uses all the industrial scale technology it can.

It's almost like you have no idea what 3D printing is good for?

Fast food industry produces many of the same thing at a mass scale. They already have expensive devices to create any sort of food in any sort of shape in any sort of combination of materials, as long as they can sell a million of the same thing that comes out of it per day. Think of all the crisps/chips in weird shapes, deep-frozen meat snacks in crazy shapes, pre-packaged meals (you thought that was normal gravy? mash potatoe? cheese? sausage? think again). There's an awesome documentary series on Dutch television in the past couple of years explaining where our industrially processed foods come from*. It's hilarious, from revealing that Kellogg's "Special K" cereal adds non-ionized (metallic) iron to claim "WITH EXTRA IRON" (your body doesn't process it) up to exploding chickens (bought a chick from a huge industrial facility, apparently they're not "designed" to be able to live longer than 4-6 weeks).

ANYWAY I digress.


The point of the 3D printing is for fine culinary applications that want to be able to create something different every single time. Not fast-food. What would they need 3D printers for? Maybe for their research labs.





(* Dunno if you've ever seen "wheat fibre" as an ingredient on "food"? Ever wondered what that is? It looks exactly like pocket fluff, bright white fluffy paper fibres :lol: Got no nutritional content whatsoever (it's not bad for you either), it's pushed there with the excuse that "extra fibre in your food is good for your intestines", except this additive does not significantly do so in the amounts it's used (compared to say, vegetables), it's purely there for filling and because it soaks up water so nicely, for even more filling volume. It's used in most cheap sausages, but many other things. I dunno, maybe in the USA it's "corn fibre", cause you make everything out of corn?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Rumckle on January 08, 2011, 06:32:54 am
It's hilarious, from revealing that Kellogg's "Special K" cereal adds non-ionized (metallic) iron to claim "WITH EXTRA IRON" (your body doesn't process it)

There was a simple experiment I did when I was a kid about that. You get a small bag of cereal with lots of iron in it (the metallic kind) and crush it up, then you can separate the iron with a magnet, it's kinda weird to think that you eat that.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on February 22, 2011, 02:03:18 pm
Research into printing human skin with the same technology:

http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/innovation/02/19/bioprinting.wounded.soldiers/index.html?hpt=Sbin

Quote
Researchers are developing a specialized skin "printing" system that could be used in the future to treat soldiers wounded on the battlefield.

Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine were inspired by standard inkjet printers found in many home offices.

"We started out by taking a typical desktop inkjet cartridge. Instead of ink we use cells, which are placed in the cartridge," said Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the institute.

The device could be used to rebuild damaged or burned skin.

The project is in pre-clinical phases and may take another five years of development before it is ready to be used on human burn victims, he said.

Other universities, including Cornell University and the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, are working on similar projects and will speak on the topic on Sunday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Washington. These university researchers say organs -- not just skin -- could be printed using similar techniques.

Burn injuries account for 5% to 20% of combat-related injuries, according to the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine. The skin printing project is one of several projects at Wake Forest largely funded by that institute, which is a branch of the U.S. Department of Defense.

Wake Forest will receive approximately $50 million from the Defense Department over the next five years to fund projects, including the skin-creating system.

Researchers developed the skin "bio-printer" by modifying a standard store-bought printer. One modification is the addition of a three-dimensional "elevator" that builds on damaged tissue with fresh layers of healthy skin.

The skin-printing process involves several steps. First, a small piece of skin is taken from the patient. The sample is about half the size of a postage stamp, and it is taken from the patient by using a chemical solution.

Those cells are then separated and replicated on their own in a specialized environment that catalyzes this cell development.

"We expand the cells in large quantities. Once we make those new cells, the next step is to put the cells in the printer, on a cartridge, and print on the patient," Atala said.

The printer is then placed over the wound at a distance so that it doesn't touch the burn victim. "It's like a flat-bed scanner that moves back and forth and put cells on you," said Atala.

Once the new cells have been applied, they mature and form new skin.

Specially designed printer heads in the skin bio-printer use pressurized nozzles -- unlike those found in traditional inkjet printers.

The pressure-based delivery system allows for a safe distance between the printer and the patient and can accommodate a variety of body types, according to a 2010 report from the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine.

The device can fabricate healthy skin in anywhere from minutes to a few hours, depending on the size and type of burn, according to the report.

"You are building up the cells layer after layer after layer," Atala said.

Acquiring an adequate sample can be a challenge in victims with extensive burns, he said, since there is sometimes "not enough (skin) to go around with a patient with large burns," Atala said.

The sample biopsy would be used to grow new cells then placed in the printer cartridge, said Atala.

Researchers said it is difficult to speculate when the skin printer may be brought to the battlefield, because of the stringent regulatory steps for a project of this nature. Once the skin-printing device meets federal regulations, military officials are optimistic it will benefit the general population as well as soldiers.

"We're not making anything military-unique," said Terry Irgens, a program director at the U.S Army Medical Materiel Development Activity.

"We hope it will benefit both soldier and civilian," he said.

In the meantime, researchers said they're pleased with results of preliminary laboratory testing with the skin printer.

Atala said the researchers already have been able to make "healthy skin."

now that's just fucking cool.  Reminds me of that scene from The Fifth Element.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on February 22, 2011, 03:07:17 pm
 :eek: that is so cool!
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Requia ☣ on February 22, 2011, 06:46:34 pm
I've been looking at the price of Print on Demand 3d printing.  Some of the materials Shapeways offers are dirt cheap if you need small bits and ends.  Working on my 3d again.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on February 22, 2011, 09:29:11 pm
HOLY SHIT! I hadn't heard of Shapeways (http://www.shapeways.com/)... what a bad ass site!

My roommate is a CG designer, he's a whiz with cad software... oh yes, the gears are turning.

gears like this: http://www.shapeways.com/model/56881/steampunk_d20__3cm_.html?gid=mg
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Luna on February 22, 2011, 09:32:01 pm
HOLY SHIT! I hadn't heard of Shapeways (http://www.shapeways.com/)... what a bad ass site!

My roommate is a CG designer, he's a whiz with cad software... oh yes, the gears are turning.

gears like this: http://www.shapeways.com/model/56881/steampunk_d20__3cm_.html?gid=mg

That is a whole box of awesome.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cramulus on February 22, 2011, 09:32:43 pm
GEORGE JETSON CALLED, HE WANTS HIS REALITY BACK
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cuddlefish on February 23, 2011, 05:56:12 am
HOLY SHIT! I hadn't heard of Shapeways (http://www.shapeways.com/)... what a bad ass site!

My roommate is a CG designer, he's a whiz with cad software... oh yes, the gears are turning.

gears like this: http://www.shapeways.com/model/56881/steampunk_d20__3cm_.html?gid=mg

Holy crapz. I want dice! The thorn ones look might neat, as well.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Luna on February 23, 2011, 11:01:58 am
HOLY SHIT! I hadn't heard of Shapeways (http://www.shapeways.com/)... what a bad ass site!

My roommate is a CG designer, he's a whiz with cad software... oh yes, the gears are turning.

gears like this: http://www.shapeways.com/model/56881/steampunk_d20__3cm_.html?gid=mg

Holy crapz. I want dice! The thorn ones look might neat, as well.

Once the apartment is done being furnished, I'm thinking dice are next...  And someplace to store all my freakin' miniatures that isn't "in a box behind the couch."
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Requia ☣ on February 23, 2011, 05:28:06 pm
HOLY SHIT! I hadn't heard of Shapeways (http://www.shapeways.com/)... what a bad ass site!

My roommate is a CG designer, he's a whiz with cad software... oh yes, the gears are turning.

gears like this: http://www.shapeways.com/model/56881/steampunk_d20__3cm_.html?gid=mg

Holy crapz. I want dice! The thorn ones look might neat, as well.

I'm thinking I might modify the companion cube into a D6 and make copies.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on June 09, 2011, 02:30:45 pm
Any of you spags catch Colbert last night?  He had a guy showcasing a 3d printer design that he said cost around 2100 (I think)

I don't think any other tech has had me this excited for over a decade.

Ram dropping to $1 a MB over the course of just a few years is probably comparable to the awesome factor, but man this thing's got REAL legs and serious potential as a game changer in ways no other tech has for decades.

I'm working out a thread in my head atm that runs along the lines of "3D Home Printing: The New New Shmoo"

I hadn't thought of the Shmoo in years and then LMNO said he wanted to fuck one and suddenly I'm finding them the perfect metaphor for this tech, at least in my head.  I'll post it when I get my thoughts more ordered and coherent.

ETA: http://www.businessinsider.com/makerbot-colbert-2011-6

Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: BabylonHoruv on June 14, 2011, 04:51:51 pm
haven't seen this link here yet.:
http://www.thingiverse.com/

also, just so that it's clear... the materials used in this are pretty limited yet.
most of the 3d printing is done in ABS.  rigid plastic.
the guy at the hackerspace yesterday spent the evening trying to tune his machine to use ALS plastic, which is a corn based plastic (biodegradable transparent stuff... he had difficulties)

i think were still a good ways out from printing a shoe...

an example of what's immediately possible, is one of the fellows there had some Bose headsets that he likes, but a piece on them became broken.  they are apparently pretty pricey and he likes them, but Bose said they were unable to sell him a replacement part.  So he's going to model it up and have the fellow with the printer spit one out.  i wonder how that would go down in court if the component became available on the web.  and Bose bitched about it....

candyfab prints on sugar.  It looks relatively simple to tune to various other materials as well, including chocolate and low melting point plastic.  I couldn't understand the documentation on how to build one all that well though, so I am kinda talking out my ass.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on June 15, 2011, 05:29:56 pm
You can even eat the dishes!
\
(http://data.whicdn.com/images/1331912/wonka_teacup_thumb.jpg?1263659689)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on June 28, 2011, 03:46:19 pm
Check this guy out! (http://www.gizmag.com/solar-sinter-3d-printer/19046/)
He made a 'Solar Sinter' unit that uses a big Fresnel lens to sinter silica sand for making glass objects using the sun.
(http://images.gizmag.com/gallery_lrg/solar-sinter-3.jpg)
reshape the desert!
(http://images.gizmag.com/gallery_lrg/solar-sinter-2.jpg)
I'm curious how that bowl would look polished up...
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Jenne on June 28, 2011, 04:31:56 pm
THAT is cool.  I'm betting things like Croc shoes and plastic dishes can also be made from this 3D printing shizen.  What a fun job it would be to sit and create stuff to print out all day.

They say pretty soon we'll be able to print out a phone and just buy the guts from someone to put into it and make them ourselves.  Same with cameras, of course.  So you design your own casing and then the parts that go inside you order from a manufacturer.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Triple Zero on June 28, 2011, 05:15:28 pm
When I saw that I was really worried that the kind of shades he's wearing didn't seem nearly enough to protect his eyes from that very very very blight glowing dot ... but I might be wrong.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on June 28, 2011, 06:03:10 pm
his entire outfit was purchased from Willy Wonka enterprises, and is extremely safe.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on July 09, 2011, 03:02:30 pm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZboxMsSz5Aw&feature=player_embedded
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: LMNO on July 13, 2011, 05:09:02 pm
(http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/3d_printer.png)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on July 13, 2011, 05:19:15 pm
I wonder if affordable home 3d printers will be a boon to strategic miniatures games (like warhammer type stuff)?

i know i would be more likely to try one out if i didn't have to pay the ridiculously high prices...

I also wonder what it will do to the collectible figurine market.  you know, all those pvc models that the anime/comic crowd spend cash on...
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on July 13, 2011, 05:25:52 pm
An entirely new type of file piracy involving 3d models designed by pro 3d modelers.

I also predict problems with quality when people begin trying to replace broken parts on equipment using home cooked designs rather than made by the manufacturer.

This will likely make CNN when someone tries it with car parts.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Cainad (dec.) on July 13, 2011, 05:38:24 pm
I wonder if affordable home 3d printers will be a boon to strategic miniatures games (like warhammer type stuff)?

i know i would be more likely to try one out if i didn't have to pay the ridiculously high prices...

I also wonder what it will do to the collectible figurine market.  you know, all those pvc models that the anime/comic crowd spend cash on...

The companies that stand to lose a lot from this will flip the fuck out and launch their arsenal of Tactical Lawyer Missiles.

It won't work; they'll lose lots of money and pirating of printable 3D models will flourish. A new crappy imageboard, called /3d/, will emerge to help facilitate the sharing of these models.


EDIT: DAMN YUO PICKLE! :argh!:
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on August 24, 2011, 05:46:19 pm
the MakerBot group just accepted $10 Million in angel investment... (http://www.makerbot.com/blog/2011/08/23/all-star-lineup-invests-in-makerbot/)
it'll be neat to see where they go with this.  according to the article announcing it, they had previously turned 75k of investment into 5200 makerbots in private hands.  $10 M could go a long way!

Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Telarus on August 25, 2011, 12:15:23 am
Hey guys. I got a business contact (that I can't get into details about currently, y'know) that needs more info on the 3D printing workflow.

Specifically what filetypes are supported, most common printer setup, etc? The final sculpt would have a good level of detailed surface work, and fit in a bounding box about the size of a pack of cigarettes.

Any help would be seriously appreciated, and I may be able to turn this into a paid gig.

(going back to re-read this thread now, thanks for the bump)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on August 25, 2011, 09:58:56 am
I was just shopping around for online rapid prototyping services last night, and found this.

http://www.quickparts.com/

What you're wanting to do sounds similar to what I'm thinking of doing (small parts with fine detail), and the PolyJet process seems like the best option for me.

http://www.quickparts.com/LowVolumePrototypes/PolyJet.aspx

Their PATENTED QuickQuotetm price quoting process uses the .stl filetype.

http://www.quickparts.com/QuickQuote/FAQs.aspx

I like Alibre Design Personal for design software, and it either exports or natively saves to .stl.

http://www.alibre.com/products/hobby/

I've played with the free trial version a little, It was ok I guess. I'm not really an expert at 3d cad. I've had 1 class on it, and played with Sketchup some.

There are exporters for .stl for sketchup, but you may need the Pro version, which costs more than Alibre Personal.

Alibre also sells 3d printers.

http://www.alibre.com/3dprinters/default.asp
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on August 25, 2011, 02:06:37 pm
The most common 3d cad formats are .STP for ease of translation, .STL and .WRL for prototyping machines.

Any 3D cad software worth it's salt will convert a model into these formats, no matter what it's native file type.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: P3nT4gR4m on August 25, 2011, 05:13:25 pm
A lot of the guys at zbrush central (http://www.zbrushcentral.com) have been printing out their stuff for a while now. I'm pretty sure file format isn't that big of an issue.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Telarus on August 26, 2011, 08:18:16 pm
Thanks Jerry, Pickle! I'll start reading up.

A lot of the guys at zbrush central (http://www.zbrushcentral.com) have been printing out their stuff for a while now. I'm pretty sure file format isn't that big of an issue.

Ha! excellent. Thanks Pent.

 I found the  'Mouse Jeweler's' thread (http://www.zbrushcentral.com/showthread.php?t=135212&page=1&pp=15)... some cool work there, and very much the workflow I'm looking towards (but I won't be casting silver or gold).

Know of any other good ones?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on August 28, 2011, 08:24:29 pm
Creo Elements/Direct Modeling Express 4.0, (Formerly CoCreate Modeling Personal Edition ) is free, and exports VRML and STL.

http://www.ptc.com/products/creo-elements-direct/modeling-express/#1

I've just installed it. Hopefully, I'll have some time to look at it next weekend.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on August 31, 2011, 04:27:31 am
The toughness of things made ia 3d printing can be controlled by how close the machine is told to make each pass.



Somewhere in a box in California is the shattered remains of my drink cup grabbing claw. Of which I no longer have the 3d model of. : :cry:

In other news, I found the thumbdrive with my cad files.  :fap:
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on September 13, 2011, 08:09:42 am
This is the software "package" I have decided to go with:


http://www.cnc4free.org/

Heightmap from grayscale bitmaps created in gimp (free), 3d mesh generated in gmax (free). Relief from bitmaps can be applied to models also created in gmax.

He also tells how to convert between filetypes with MeshLab and generate toolpaths with CNC_Toolkit. (all of which is free)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on September 18, 2011, 09:40:34 pm
This is the software "package" I have decided to go with:


http://www.cnc4free.org/

Heightmap from grayscale bitmaps created in gimp (free), 3d mesh generated in gmax (free). Relief from bitmaps can be applied to models also created in gmax.

He also tells how to convert between filetypes with MeshLab and generate toolpaths with CNC_Toolkit. (all of which is free)

Quoted for later followup.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on September 19, 2011, 04:33:23 am
I've noticed that no-one seems to be using gMax for 3D design in the MakerBot community, and I don't know why that is.

Here's what I found in the MakerBot Wiki:

http://wiki.makerbot.com/how-to-print

Quote
Free 3D Modeling Software

    Google SketchUp (requires the freeware plugin to export STL)
    Blender (GPL)
    Art of Illusion (GPL)
    TopMod3D (GPL)
    Wings3D (GPL)
    StructureSynth (GPL)
    OpenSCAD (GPL)
    Heekscad


Non-free 3D Modeling Software

    Alibre
    AC3D
    Maya
    Rhino3D
    Solidworks
    form Z
    AutoQ3D
    FabLab ModelMaker stl output for Fab@school (untested on Makerbot)

I'm going to finish what I've started with the cnc4free tutorial, then have a look at some of this other software. (the free stuff)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Triple Zero on September 27, 2011, 01:15:09 am
http://techcrunch.com/2011/09/20/is-printing-a-gun-the-same-as-buying-a-gun/

very interesting. apparently there is one piece you need a permit for, and the rest of the pieces you can order anywhere without a permit do assemble your own gun?

but assuming they outlaw or "block" this particular piece, what's to stop anyone from uploading an "obfuscated" piece, that you just need to saw off a few bits in order to get the illegal bit?

now I don't know anything about guns, or the laws applying to them in the USA, so maybe I'm very wrong about this but I'm sure you'll correct me.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on September 27, 2011, 02:02:47 am
yes.  all guns have some particular part that is 'the gun' and the rest are just parts.  this differs from gun to gun.  some its the lower reciever, some the upper, some the trigger group, some even the barrel.
some weapons that were controlled under the NFA of '34 differ from specific gun to specific gun.  for instance, some Uzis have the reciever as the registered component, and some the bolt..
further, there is an ATF ruling (actually an 'opinion letter') that states that the registered part is only the registered part after it is more than 80% complete.  (which is a vague and debatable point to say the least)
so you can purchase a casting of an AR15 lower reciever (which is the registered part) with some of the milling done to it, but is 'shy of 80%'
another interesting anectdote:  they ATF have declared to be a machine gun 'any firearm capable of firing more than one projectile with a single pull of the trigger', and also includes or 'any parts designed and intended to convert a firearm into a machine gun'.  at one point they had investigated a semiautomatic rifle with a shoestring tied around the charging handle and looped around the back of the trigger guard to the trigger.  this caused the rifle to fire repeatedly, and so the determined that the shoestring was a machine gun, and registered it as such.  supposedly, it is still on the books, and is still out there floating around as a post-may dealer sample.  (they have since given another ruling that a shoestring is only a machine gun when installed on a semiautomatic rifle that it renders to fire fully automatically.  this seems odd however in comparison to drop in auto-sears for guns such as the HKs, or auto trips like the Lighting Link for the AR15...)

Oh....
this thread is about 3d printing, isn't it?
um..... oh! on Thingyverse.com somone posted an AR15 magazine model, and a bunch of members flipped out in nice hoplophobic fashion....
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Triple Zero on September 27, 2011, 04:36:56 pm
This guy designed a 17x17x17 rubix cube, and made it with a 3D printer. Still cost about $2-3k because it's got like 1800 tiny plastic parts. Also, 10 hours to assemble :)

http://www.shapeways.com/model/64058/over_the_top___17x17x17____3500.html
http://oskarvandeventer.nl/index_media17.html (scroll down a bit)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Q-370MhcDw&feature=player_embedded (simple demonstration)

Nobody has actually solved a well-scrambled one yet.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Disco Pickle on September 27, 2011, 04:59:29 pm
That material he used is desperately in need of a gloss finish.

Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Triple Zero on September 27, 2011, 05:20:46 pm
I saw some pics on which it was quite glossy.

Which makes me believe there are at least three versions.

The first one, which was done by an Austrian dude (from Oskar's design, who didn't have the funds to print it), which didn't even turn and kinda fell apart when you tried :)

And a second and a third both which seem to work, one of which is more glossy than the other.

BTW if you ever wonder what a really REALLY thick Dutch accent sounds like, check the videos. This guy is worse than some of our politicians :lol:
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on October 07, 2011, 10:18:17 am
http://my3dscanner.com/index.php

Quote
My3DScanner is a free on-line service that creates 3D models directly from ordinary digital photographs.

Take photos of any object or scene, upload them to this site and receive dense, color, 3D point cloud data completely free of charge.

This service automatically generates mesh from point cloud data and creates 3D polygonal model.


 :aaa:

Time to buy a new camera.
Any suggestions in the <$100 range?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on October 07, 2011, 03:18:32 pm
sweet!
nannywall blocks the site.  :sad:
Does it appear to look good?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on October 08, 2011, 01:33:07 am
It looks pretty good to me.

Funny thing is, I should really just model (in gmax) the thing I want to scan with it.

I can't tell if I'm being lazy, or adventurous. I guess that mainly depends on how easy it turns out to be.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on March 25, 2012, 08:50:56 am
Lookit wut I done wiff mah computar!

(http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk316/Jerry_Frankster/ColbertPipeGreen.jpg)


(http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk316/Jerry_Frankster/ColbertPipeCaramel.jpg)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on March 29, 2012, 11:02:27 pm
What the hell? :lulz:
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on March 30, 2012, 12:44:22 am
Stephen Colbert's head on a pipe.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on March 30, 2012, 01:39:22 am
Ok. I see it now. It looked like Colbert slugs for AmericaTM. What are they made from? Or is that some kind of lacquer giving them that gloss?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on March 30, 2012, 01:54:31 am
They're glazed earthenware. I made the models from shapeways parts and sculpey, and then made molds from the models.

My kiln is sitting in my back yard under a canopy, wrapped in a tarp. The pipes in this picture are sitting on top of it.

They do look like some kind of slug or something though, don't they? I've been calling them "Flukes".
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on March 30, 2012, 01:55:45 am
That's awesome. Wish I had space for a kiln.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on March 30, 2012, 02:41:00 am
They're hard to find a place for sometimes. When I've lived by myself, I just set it up in the kitchen, but roommates always make me do it outside.

I thought about smuggling it into my third floor apartment at one point last year. Finally decided against it.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Mesozoic Mister Nigel on March 31, 2012, 06:07:31 am
Those are WONDERFUL!
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Emo Howard on March 31, 2012, 07:15:30 am
Thanks. It seems like I've been working on them forever. I was afraid they were gonna suck.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on November 21, 2012, 04:39:57 pm
3D 'photobooth' in Harajuku, Japan. (http://www.spoon-tamago.com/2012/11/09/worlds-first-3d-printing-photo-booth-to-open-in-japan/)  nice little models they spit out.  pricey though.
(http://images.gizmag.com/hero/otome-3d-photo-booth.jpg)


Also:
Makerbot now has the first 3D printer retail store (http://www.makerbot.com/retail-store/).  anybody in NYC that could check it out?
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on November 30, 2012, 02:56:14 pm
Hey, now.
3D Printing no longer just for engineers and hackerspaces.
It would seem that 3D printing will be coming to a Staples store near you (http://fabbaloo.com/blog/2012/11/28/breaking-staples-to-use-mcor-iris-in-copy-centers.html#.ULjCjFKQHYY)! awesome...
the Mcor printer they will be using (http://www.mcortechnologies.com/products/mcor-iris/) is a paper based 3d printer.  standard 3d printer resolution (50x50x100 um) ,full color (1mil + CMYK) ,pretty decent build area (256 x 169 x 150mm)

it'll be neat to see what happens bringing this to the masses with a big ass company like Staples.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Ben Shapiro on January 14, 2013, 11:30:17 pm
Sweet! I can drink all I want and print a new Liver.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RMx31GnNXY
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bebek Sincap Ratatosk on January 22, 2013, 02:34:52 pm
And Buildings:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57565073-76/3d-printer-to-carve-out-worlds-first-full-size-building/ (http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57565073-76/3d-printer-to-carve-out-worlds-first-full-size-building/)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: iSPEAKonlyFORthe23 on February 01, 2013, 01:24:58 am
such a boner from reading this thread
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on February 22, 2013, 05:27:06 am
Hand held 3d pen?

Hand held 3d pen (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1351910088/3doodler-the-worlds-first-3d-printing-pen#EdibCanTheDoodPrinToffChocSugaEtc)
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Bu☆ns on February 22, 2013, 06:33:27 am
Sweet! I can drink all I want and print a new Liver.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RMx31GnNXY

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/20/scientists-create-new-ear_n_2728612.html?utm_hp_ref=technology

This shit's incredible.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Don Coyote on February 22, 2013, 01:54:20 pm
OH MY!!!
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: AFK on March 21, 2013, 03:34:17 am
http://www.cracked.com/quick-fixes/the-4-worst-things-people-are-making-with-3d-printers/
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: Elder Iptuous on March 21, 2013, 02:21:51 pm
http://www.cracked.com/quick-fixes/the-4-worst-things-people-are-making-with-3d-printers/

man, i gotta learn to CAD in 3D.
there presumably is a niche market out there somewhere for AR-15 lower receivers with integral bong, and i want in on it.
or, perhaps dildo shaped buffer tubes for said rifle.  or fetus shaped muzzlebreaks, bongs, or dildos.
dildo bongs are simply too unhygienic, i guess....
remember, every horrible mashup imaginable of already embarrassing things will soon become available, too!

Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: von on April 09, 2013, 04:01:04 am
An entirely new type of file piracy involving 3d models designed by pro 3d modelers.

I also predict problems with quality when people begin trying to replace broken parts on equipment using home cooked designs rather than made by the manufacturer.

This will likely make CNN when someone tries it with car parts.

The quality issues are already showing up in the AR components people are manufacturing. They deteriorate far more rapidly than factory materials.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: The Good Reverend Roger on April 09, 2013, 04:51:08 am
An entirely new type of file piracy involving 3d models designed by pro 3d modelers.

I also predict problems with quality when people begin trying to replace broken parts on equipment using home cooked designs rather than made by the manufacturer.

This will likely make CNN when someone tries it with car parts.

The quality issues are already showing up in the AR components people are manufacturing. They deteriorate far more rapidly than factory materials.

There's a pretty good reason for that.
Title: Re: 3D Printing no longer just for Rapid Prototyping
Post by: von on April 09, 2013, 05:08:53 am
An entirely new type of file piracy involving 3d models designed by pro 3d modelers.

I also predict problems with quality when people begin trying to replace broken parts on equipment using home cooked designs rather than made by the manufacturer.

This will likely make CNN when someone tries it with car parts.

The quality issues are already showing up in the AR components people are manufacturing. They deteriorate far more rapidly than factory materials.

There's a pretty good reason for that.

From what I can tell, it has to do with how much weaker 3d printing plastics are vs. Polymer/sheet metal.

Imo, printing guns is kinda a moot point...I mean, mags mabey, but firearms themselves will require machined metallic parts regardless of how much plastic furniture you wrap around it