Principia Discordia

Principia Discordia => Propaganda Depository => Topic started by: PoFP on May 18, 2015, 03:00:06 am

Title: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: PoFP on May 18, 2015, 03:00:06 am
This is one of my favorite aspects of this forum: The propaganda you guys post on here. The thought of posting propaganda around my town and other places. The thought of making my own propaganda. It all really just makes life better.

I'm not very creative, but I wanna contribute to this part of the community. What software have you guys found to be best for creating each type of propaganda? I imagine Publisher is great for posters with writing, cards, documents and whatnot. But what about the graphical shit? What's best for simple graphics? What's best for more complex graphics? Could you explain some of your methodology?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. And I promise to upload proof of any IRL postage of my creations, as well as any reactions I see. And I plan to post EVERYTHING in IRL that I make that I'm satisfied with. If I can get some juices flowing in this area, I will fill this thread with content. I noticed that A LOT of the posts in this thread are VERY VERY old, relatively. So I would assume that you guys would want some more content in this area.

Thanks.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: Q. G. Pennyworth on May 18, 2015, 03:28:54 am
I use an older version of the adobe creative suite because fuck paying by the month for software. I get the most use out of Photoshop and InDesign. Most of the work that I do is just finding nice things and smashing them together, which works great in those programs. it's important to use really, really large files and view them at 100% before saving your final versions or you end up with a pixelly mess.

For the early Big Words images, I took all of the border and graphics stuff from the From Old Books website. I had to scale the images up a lot, which involved a fun dance of blur then sharpen which I can explain in detail if you want. Most of the more recent stuff I've been using public domain images from pixabay and free fonts. Dafont, font squirrel, and 1001 free fonts all have a lot of decorative or dingbat options, including calligraphy and frames. If you have a deviant art account, a lot of people release their stuff there CC.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: PoFP on May 18, 2015, 03:43:23 am
I use an older version of the adobe creative suite because fuck paying by the month for software. I get the most use out of Photoshop and InDesign. Most of the work that I do is just finding nice things and smashing them together, which works great in those programs. it's important to use really, really large files and view them at 100% before saving your final versions or you end up with a pixelly mess.

For the early Big Words images, I took all of the border and graphics stuff from the From Old Books website. I had to scale the images up a lot, which involved a fun dance of blue then sharpen which I can explain in detail if you want. Most of the more recent stuff I've been using public domain images from pixabay and free fonts. Dafont, font squirrel, and 1001 free fonts all have a lot of decorative or dingbat options, including calligraphy and frames. If you have a deviant art account, a lot of people release their stuff there CC.

I figured Photoshop might be used. The tips and locations to get the fonts and public domain images are VERY helpful. Thank you!

I'll want to get the software before getting any detailed explanations of the methods. I'll get back to you on that.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: Q. G. Pennyworth on May 18, 2015, 04:40:48 am
Happy to help! Let me know if you want any general design and formatting tips too. I haven't got a degree in any of this shit, but I've been doing it since 2008 and you can't help but pick up a thing or two after all that time :)
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: Dubya on May 18, 2015, 06:57:31 am
Used to use GIMP on my old computer. Way more featurws than I expwcted feom free software.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: Q. G. Pennyworth on May 18, 2015, 03:05:56 pm
Used to use GIMP on my old computer. Way more featurws than I expwcted feom free software.

Gimp definitely has everything you need to do things right, I just never got comfortable with it.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: Faust on May 18, 2015, 03:13:35 pm
I use gimp for creating basic Icons for work stuff, its not friendly. I often have to Google basic stuff that comes off as intuitive in CS, but once you get used to that being a fact of life for it, it becomes quite easy to use.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: Mesozoic Mister Nigel on May 18, 2015, 05:04:07 pm
I have used Photoshop and Illustrator extensively in my businesses, and I highly recommend going on eBay and getting the oldest version you can find for dirt cheap.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: PoFP on May 18, 2015, 06:40:01 pm
Happy to help! Let me know if you want any general design and formatting tips too. I haven't got a degree in any of this shit, but I've been doing it since 2008 and you can't help but pick up a thing or two after all that time :)

I may take you up on that.

Used to use GIMP on my old computer. Way more featurws than I expwcted feom free software.

I had GIMP on an old linux computer of mine awhile back. I played around with it a little. It was definitely more extensive than I expected it to be. I wish more software in the Open Source Community got as much developer attention.

Used to use GIMP on my old computer. Way more featurws than I expwcted feom free software.

Gimp definitely has everything you need to do things right, I just never got comfortable with it.

I found it hard to get comfortable with, as well. I thought Photoshop seemed harder, though. But Photoshop is more popular and has more documentation and more extensive tutorials, I imagine.

I use gimp for creating basic Icons for work stuff, its not friendly. I often have to Google basic stuff that comes off as intuitive in CS, but once you get used to that being a fact of life for it, it becomes quite easy to use.

Yeah, from what I found GIMP was a much better editor and shape-up program than it was any kind of creation program. But I think Photoshop is even better at doing that. I guess, GIMP is meant for simpler, quicker changes.

The way I see the difference is, if you plan on spending 5-10 minutes on a simple project, you use GIMP. If you plan on spending an hour or so for detailed work, use Photoshop. Correct me if I'm full-a shite.

I have used Photoshop and Illustrator extensively in my businesses, and I highly recommend going on eBay and getting the oldest version you can find for dirt cheap.

I've not heard of Illustrator. I'll have to look into that.


Thanks for your help, all! As soon as I find time, I'll try and get some Goebbels-level (Note: Same level, not same message) propaganda flowing. I'll also try and see what I can get put on local news that will piss off the dippers, mudders, and cousin-fuckers. If anything along those lines happens, I'll be sure to link the news clip.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: Q. G. Pennyworth on May 18, 2015, 06:55:46 pm
To me, gimp vs photoshop is mostly a matter of personal comfort. If you can sit there in gimp for three hours and not want to punch the screen, it can do everything you need as far as layout and editing goes. The most important tools at your disposal are the rulers and guides and a well stocked portfolio of fonts and public domain images.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: LMNO on May 18, 2015, 06:57:54 pm
Microsoft Paint or GTFO.


Honestly though, I know my stuff isn't the greatest, but for the bumpersticker stuff, I use whatever customizable online sticker site allows free previews, and then just screenshot and trim the fucker.


I'm like the MacGyver of stupid internet shit.
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: PoFP on May 18, 2015, 07:05:56 pm
To me, gimp vs photoshop is mostly a matter of personal comfort. If you can sit there in gimp for three hours and not want to punch the screen, it can do everything you need as far as layout and editing goes. The most important tools at your disposal are the rulers and guides and a well stocked portfolio of fonts and public domain images.

Ohh, okay. Well, considering my short attention-span when it comes to all things dealing with creativity, I may wanna stick with the less frustrating of the two. At least until I get used to editing software in general.

Microsoft Paint or GTFO.


Honestly though, I know my stuff isn't the greatest, but for the bumpersticker stuff, I use whatever customizable online sticker site allows free previews, and then just screenshot and trim the fucker.


I'm like the MacGyver of stupid internet shit.

I may wanna try that once or twice just to be able to say that's how I did it :lulz:
Title: Re: What is the most viable graphical art software for posters, ads, etc.
Post by: Dubya on May 18, 2015, 08:50:58 pm
Microsoft Paint or GTFO.


Honestly though, I know my stuff isn't the greatest, but for the bumpersticker stuff, I use whatever customizable online sticker site allows free previews, and then just screenshot and trim the fucker.


I'm like the MacGyver of stupid internet shit.

Thats brilliant. If my computer was working, I would be compelled to try it. As it is, I can only curse in frustration and go on writing out stickers by hand.