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Messages - Demolition_Squid

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46
Apple Talk / Re: Nigel's Shiny New Life Thread
« on: March 13, 2012, 09:18:54 pm »
My tutors absolutely hated powerpoints. I actually got graded up for NOT using them in a couple of classes! I feel your pain, but figure-only powerpoint is totally the best use of them. Picture-strewn, text-laden crap with fancy screenwipes are just distracting, IMO.

47
Aneristic Illusions / Re: Financial fuckery thread
« on: March 13, 2012, 03:23:33 pm »
One employee is specifically called out for his actions in 2007. It sounds like they could be looking back over everything from the past 26 years (which would take a very long time, obviously), but the article isn't entirely clear on that point. Although a lawyer for a bank attached to the investigation is playing down the cooperation and scale, the FBI, Department of Justice, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, European Commission and Financial Services Authority are all called out as probing into this area, as well as the Japanese Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission

48
Aneristic Illusions / Re: Financial fuckery thread
« on: March 13, 2012, 03:14:41 pm »
The FT are breaking a new story right now (haven't been able to find it mentioned elsewhere) which implies that the banks conspired to set interest rates.

The full article is here I don't know if you can see it without signing up but I'll try and summarize the key points.

As we know a large part of the credit crunch was down to banks being unwilling to lend to one another.

What determined bank 'confidence' was their Libor rating. Every day employees at the major banks are asked: “At what rate could you borrow funds, were you to do so by asking for and then accepting interbank offers in a reasonable market size, just prior to 11am?”

Regulators are now uncovering evidence which suggests banks colluded in order to try and manipulate interest rates. At best, they have been massaging the answer to the question to make themselves look stronger than they are (after all, if they look strong then the answer to the question genuinely does become better for them). At worst, it is a cynical manipulation which has caused untold damage to the EU economy. Amongst other things, the average US adjustable rate mortgage is linked to Libor.

It looks like most of the major banks are holding their hands up to some kind of culpability in this, which implies that the rot goes very deep and is undeniable.

49
Apple Talk / Re: Nigel's Shiny New Life Thread
« on: March 13, 2012, 02:49:38 pm »
We had a similar fucknozzle at university. Thankfully I didn't take his class, but he almost cost several of my friends their degree (or at least, it felt like it at the time) by marking essays as '0' if he detected a single error in referencing.

I believe that the decision was overturned after class rebellion at the fact that referencing was only allowed, by University regulations, to account for 10 per cent of the grade of the paper, but he caused a LOT of stress to a lot of students.

Yes. This crazy woman is like that. Dinged 25% for turning in a paper after class instead of before, unrealistic expectations, delusions of grandeur, poor communication, etc.

There are some lecturers who seem to view students as getting in the way of being a lecturer, or that they have to make life as miserable as possible for the students who dare to try and take their class. It boggles me, but I guess you get people like that all over.

50
Apple Talk / Re: Nigel's Shiny New Life Thread
« on: March 13, 2012, 02:42:53 pm »
We had a similar fucknozzle at university. Thankfully I didn't take his class, but he almost cost several of my friends their degree (or at least, it felt like it at the time) by marking essays as '0' if he detected a single error in referencing.

I believe that the decision was overturned after class rebellion at the fact that referencing was only allowed, by University regulations, to account for 10 per cent of the grade of the paper, but he caused a LOT of stress to a lot of students.

51
Think for Yourself, Schmuck! / Re: The Future We Deserve - 100 essays
« on: March 13, 2012, 11:36:28 am »
Number 12 - There is No Future - Eleanor Saitta is where I stopped for today and that one so far has stood out the most. It has some common themes in line with modern Discordian thinking - the overall message being 'don't reject reality just because it isn't comfortable, it is still happening whether you like it or not'.

Seasteading has been the weakest so far, IMO (though the one talking about tomatoes was laughable as well). I'm not sure whether the idea you don't have to fight anyone to claim a lump of ocean and start living there, or the claim that we'll all go back to eating only locally produced food in the future because it is more rewarding (I think  :?) is more ridiculous.

52
Think for Yourself, Schmuck! / Re: The Future We Deserve - 100 essays
« on: March 13, 2012, 09:28:27 am »
This is great.

I was amused to see the seasteading guy is in there. Plugging away his vision of a future with a competitive market for nation states. :lulz:

53
No, I thought this was amazing. Particularly the take on the police on the previous page. I'm not sure what to add, other than that at this point, I would be more surprised if there wasn't a high level conspiracy and deep rooted corruption throughout the police.

It would not surprise me if the Conservatives were in bed with the news of the world for this, and should all this come to light...

Well, I wish I could say I think it'd bring the government down, but I'm not that optimistic. It might reinvigorate the protests this year, though, and that could be a very good thing.

54
Apple Talk / Re: ATTN: NOLODEMIEL
« on: March 10, 2012, 10:54:58 pm »
You may find this of use.

http://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/george-orwells-5-rules-for-effective-writing/

#4 is a biggie. Noticed it myself before reading that. I'm not sure why it hits my writing so hard. Speaking in that manner is not a tendency with which I am associated.  :roll:

 :lulz:

Yes, passive voice is sometimes necessary, but is incredibly disengaging when overused. That's one of the things I loathe most about e-prime; it relies heavily on passive voice.

But isn't e-prime supposed to be disengaging? Gland free communication for a sedate tomorrow?

Yes. It's a perfect form of communication for androids.

It seems like a perfect form of communication for androids. I am not sure we can know without their input.

Beep boop.

55
well, on the one hand I think arguing the semantics is indeed in poor taste. Especially since murderous ethnic cleansing literally and figuratively bleeds over into genocide.

on the other hand, I don't quite see what's the benefit for France (and probably other EU countries) is to insist on calling it genocide versus a war crime and murderous ethnic cleansing, except for being difficult about Turkey's admission to the EU, since calling it "murderous ethnic cleansing" isn't going to make people think it's less bad than genocide as the terms are synonymous enough to the average person, and it opens up the discussion of Turkey's guilt in the matter.

or is there some other war crime related reason that calling it "murderous ethnic cleansing" would somehow let Turkey off the hook in some sense? because I don't see it.

Voting in the EU is done by population.

Turkey is massive, and overwhelmingly Muslim.

France have Issues with Islam. Everyone else has Issues with a massive country joining the EU without completely signing up to the ethics of the organization (and with Islam to some extent too). If Turkey is a country willing, as a nation, to distance themselves from genocide on the sort of technicalities that Rat is doing here, do they seem like the sort of country it is going to be easy to work with when you need to bend the rules? (See: all of the bailouts at the moment)

56
At the least, it has changed my view that the Armenians were a peaceful people that were killed simply because of their ethnic and religious heritage.


2/3rds of them deserved it?

Not at all. No one deserves it. However, the armenians were actively at war with the Turks, supporting a Russian invasion after engaging in Christian on Muslim violence and wiping out entire cities of Muslims. Unlike the Jews in Germany and Europe, who weren't doing anything against the government, these people had attacked government troops and local civilians multiple times... ergo not 'peaceful' and the deaths appear far more likely to be related to the military action, rather than their ethnic heritage.

I had not realized that before. I certainly hadn't realized that both sides were guilty of war crimes.

Wow, all 1 million, including children, engaged in this? That's pretty impressive.

Seriously. Arguing semantics at this kind of level (which is exactly what 'but the definition says...') is in incredibly poor taste. It makes it difficult to take anything else you have to say regarding Turkey and free speech seriously, to say the least.

57
Wait wait wait wow... so, I think we need to start a list of issues you have been ignoring in this thread despite the fact that they've been repeatedly brought up.

Let's start with the ~100 journalists that are imprisoned because of Turkey's censorship laws... maybe after that we can move on to discuss how a genocide could be "unpremeditated".

Perhaps at some point we could come around to the fucked-up sexism implied in that fact that a woman's father and brothers might kill a man for calling her a slut.

But Nigel, they all seem so HAPPY!

If people are smiling and cheerful all the time, then everything is great, right? It isn't like there could be anything underneath those smiles! Nope! Just keep smiling!  :) :) :)

58
Apple Talk / Re: ATTN: FRIENDS OF EARTHA
« on: March 09, 2012, 09:54:58 am »
Personally I'm pretty sick of people taking the time to let everyone know how they won't be taking the time to be here any more.

It just comes off as a cry for attention, like someone shouting "You guys aren't my friends any more!" and running off, expecting to be followed.

Perhaps I'm just desensitized as it seem to happen on a schedule and the people who do it most often don't tend to be the same people who actually do stop posting.

59
Its any subject which is seen to bring Turkey into disrepute.

The subject in question isn't relevant.  Either you can speak your mind, or you can't.

Turkey has conscription and does not accept conscientious objection.

Conscription or lack thereof isn't a hallmark of freedom or the lack thereof.

Most countries have conscription, or at least - as in the US - a conscription plan in place, for which all eligible people must register.  In our case, this is written into our constitution as a power of government, and no provision is made for conscientious objection.  That is a matter of federal law, and carries with it a large burden of proof to be supplied by the objector to prove that he is in fact an objector.

But the government can eliminate provisions for conscientious objection with no constitutional issues.

I'm not sure how this works in the US, but in Europe, Turkey is one of only three nations which does not recognize the right of an individual to refuse to assist in taking the lives of other individuals on religious or ethical grounds.

Not to get too bogged down in this, but it certainly is considered another 'black mark' against their human rights record on this side of the pond.

Wasnt another snag in turkey joining the eu that they still have capital punishment on the books?

Turkey does not have capital punishment any more.

60
I still want to know what happens if you call it "genocide" in public in Turkey.

Currently, nothing.... unless you say "Turks are a bunch of motherfucking sluts and committed genocide."

Article 301 of the Turkish legal code makes "denigrating Turkishness" illegal, and is the primary legal weapon used against people who claim what happend to the Armenians was a genocide. 

Quote
O DENIGRATE TURKISHNESS, REPUBLIC, AND INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANS OF THE STATE ARTICLE 301:

“1 - A person who publicly denigrates Turkishness, the Republic or the Grand National Assembly of Turkey, shall be punishable by imprisonment of between six months and three years.

2 - A person who publicly denigrates Government of the Republic of Turkey, the judicial institutions of the State, the military or security organizations shall be punishable by imprisonment of between six months and two years.

3 - In cases where denigration of Turkishness is committed by a Turkish citizen in another country the punishment shall be increased by one third.

Of course, nowadays, the preferred method is to send around far-right paramilitaries to murder someone, as in the case of Hrant Dink.


Wow.

Whaaaaaaaaaaaat Turkey sounds full of crazy like the US. Only instead of drones it's a personal touch.

Leaving out the paramilitary bit, the fact is that a Turk does not have the right to speak the truth as he or she sees it, on at least one subject, unless his belief is in line with the Turkish government.

Therefore, there is no freedom of speech in Turkey.

Its any subject which is seen to bring Turkey into disrepute.

Turkey has conscription and does not accept conscientious objection. Turkey also has awful anti-terrorism laws (like many western nations) but has actually used them to curb the rights of the press.

Quote from: Human Rights Watch
Another amendment extends the use of bail or probation rather than detention for defendants facing trial for crimes with a five-year maximum prison sentence. This should cut down the widespread use of pretrial detention in Turkey, particularly for those charged with more minor terrorism offenses, Human Rights Watch said. The measure would not, however address the situation of hundreds of people facing sentences of five to ten years, such as journalists, charged with membership of an armed organization (article 314/2 of the Turkish Penal Code), a charge frequently leveled despite the absence of any evidence of their involvement in violence or in plotting violent activities.

I'm really glad Rat is having a good time out in Turkey. I'm sure lots of people are genuinely happy. I would not describe Turkish society as 'free' as we would understand the term to have any meaning, though. From what I've heard about the shifting priorities of those in government at the moment, 'democratic' might be a problematic term to apply to the country, too, soon enough.

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