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Messages - SuuCal

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1
Hibiscus is super-tasty.

It's fantastic, and super refreshing. I've brewed with it. I actually have BAGS of dried hibiscus in my cabinet that I harvested myself in Florida a few years ago, but this tea sounded lovely. And it is.

2
Today at the grocery store, I grab a box of "Hibiscus Cleanse" tea, it's new. It's hibiscus, yerba mate, and mint. I got it because it sounded tasty. And then...


Her: "Does that stuff work?"
Me: "Hmm?"
Her: "Does that tea actually work as a detox?"
Me: "No, that's what my liver is for, I just like the taste of hibiscus, and it sounds good with mint."
Her: *confused face*


Hibiscus is a diuretic, but seriously, I just think it tastes good.  :kingmeh:

3
Anyway, hi there PD. I'm here because I'm miserable, cranky, and tired, and according to the newsfeed I'm in the perfect mood for PD.com.

Since getting my thyroid disease treated in August, my range of emotions has expended past "vague sense of dying" that defined the previous six months. I have added feeling sad, stupid, and lonely to the mix.

This too shall pass and all that, but fuck it. I feel like whuppin' on some motherfucker.

Hashimoto's or Grave's?

Welcome to the "My immune system is so fucking badass it's eating my thyroid alive" club.

Grave's. My mom had Hashimoto's, so it figures. My 4-hour iodine uptake rate was 89%, which I understand to be in the "really fucking high, how are you alive" range.

Jesus Christ. You're lucky you haven't wasted away to nothing. My uncle has Grave's, he has to eat 6000-9000 calories a day, and he's still super thin. IF ONLY I HAD THAT KIND OF POWER.

But no, my thyroid decided it was best to sit in a puddle of her own drool and make me dizzy, and fall asleep every day at 2pm, and then wake up hangry, and wanting to murder my husband when he looked at me funny. I still don't think I'm balanced out, but my last blood pull showed a TSH of 0.9, so I'm on the money in that regard. Watch your vitamins, and have your doc test your B12 and D3 panels next time you go in for bloodwork. Synthetic thyroid hormones nuke them, and I know if I don't take mine daily, I will go back to crashing. On the bright side, they made my weight stabilize, finally. Last year was rough, really rough.

Hang in there, it's totally fixable, it's just a bumpy ride on the way.

4
Anyway, hi there PD. I'm here because I'm miserable, cranky, and tired, and according to the newsfeed I'm in the perfect mood for PD.com.

Since getting my thyroid disease treated in August, my range of emotions has expended past "vague sense of dying" that defined the previous six months. I have added feeling sad, stupid, and lonely to the mix.

This too shall pass and all that, but fuck it. I feel like whuppin' on some motherfucker.

Hashimoto's or Grave's?

Welcome to the "My immune system is so fucking badass it's eating my thyroid alive" club.

5
The Richard Nixon school of ballet and the arts / Re: Academia Ghetto Thread
« on: September 14, 2016, 05:16:43 pm »
Roughly how much could an author of a paper expect to receive from publishing a paper? I was under the impression that the vast majority of the cost of obtaining a paper goes to the publisher rather than the authors.

In my field, authors get a pack on the back and a line in their CV.

"Just think of the grant money you can get when they see you've been published! Here, eat this exposure!" 

6
The Richard Nixon school of ballet and the arts / Re: Academia Ghetto Thread
« on: September 14, 2016, 06:12:15 am »
Roughly how much could an author of a paper expect to receive from publishing a paper? I was under the impression that the vast majority of the cost of obtaining a paper goes to the publisher rather than the authors.

Depends on the publisher. It's not enough to make a living, but it can be a good supplement if you can churn out 2-3 papers a year for a good publication. If you publish an "article" length paper, which was described to me as 15,000 words, at 15 cents a word, you're getting over 2 grand, which is why published articles are getting shorter.

There's a lot of fighting going on right now between academics and journals, much along the same lines of artists and assholes involving "exposure", basically it looks good on grant applications. Grants are where the money is, but you sometimes can't publish without grants, and you can't get grants without being published.  :roll:


7
The Richard Nixon school of ballet and the arts / Re: Academia Ghetto Thread
« on: September 14, 2016, 05:25:48 am »
I don't understand why people whine about paying for academic papers. Scholars deserve to be paid just as much as artists or any worker does. Research can take months, or even years, and paywalls and journals exist for a reason: to help protect their intellectual rights and ensure that they can be paid fairly by the publication for their work. Yes, sometimes they can get pretty damn steep, and I understand not everybody can swing a JStor account, but that's why we have nifty things like interlibrary loan and research librarians who can help you do this at almost any public library.

Guys, seriously. I've paid too much goddamn money to go to school. Nigel has paid too much goddamn money to go to school. Millions of people have paid too much goddamn money to go to school, and put in hours of work hitting the books and labs to be able to write a coherent, peer-reviewed article. I charge 8 bucks for digital copies of my thesis. Eight. Bucks. That's it. I'd give it away for free if I wasn't paying off mountains of debt.

Scholars should not be treated any differently than artists. Time, training, and talent has a price. Please, do the right thing and obtain the research you need through the right channels. There are a great deal of tools if you can't swing journal subscriptions: Interlibrary loan, research librarians, Academia.edu, Scribd, Project Gutenberg for out of copyright releases, etc. It's just not cool to yell at people who won't just give you their research for free. Don't be that guy. It's bad enough a lot of academics find themselves dying of exposure these days anyway, it's typically called adjuncting.

-Suu
Who is riproaring pissed at some bitch right now who is calling her all sorts of things because she wouldn't give her free copies of her longest papers that are currently under review.  :argh!:

8
I start my job as a research librarian this week. I'd sass it up, but I have to wear a uniform at the museum, and no heels, because it's an aircraft carrier. On the bright side, like Roger mentioned on my FB, I don't have to schlep tourists around. I get to hide in the library and help the occasional guest out with a project while working on specific special research projects for the museum. Once I'm there for a bit, I'll go into the collections storage and help work out that mess, hopefully. Just taking a quick peek I saw several garments that needed to have condition reporting done and sent out for conservation.

Please to read the David Drake "Lt Leary" series.  Research librarians are dangerous and not to be trifled with.

oooh, free e-books even.

9
I start my job as a research librarian this week. I'd sass it up, but I have to wear a uniform at the museum, and no heels, because it's an aircraft carrier. On the bright side, like Roger mentioned on my FB, I don't have to schlep tourists around. I get to hide in the library and help the occasional guest out with a project while working on specific special research projects for the museum. Once I'm there for a bit, I'll go into the collections storage and help work out that mess, hopefully. Just taking a quick peek I saw several garments that needed to have condition reporting done and sent out for conservation.

10
Who among us was never just a skinny lad?  Who among us never knew no good from bad?  Who among has never let it all hang out?  You get left alone with Big Fat Fanny, and she makes a fat boy out of you; it cannot be avoided.  You can only sing with your band.  You can only take me home tonight.

This is the greatest fucking post of all time. It made my rockin' world go round.

11
Sorry, this whole thing is making me grumbly as hell, probably because 5am is involved to get him to work.

I'm off to a orientation tour at the new jerb. I find out what my actual assignment will be on Thursday.

12
Hide the keys, say "Nope, plan for that extra half hour or so.  No big deal."

This may be happening this weekend when I'm in South Dakota.

"Yes, I took your car key with me. Well I don't know, I hear there's a bus?"

Trying to figure out ways to get it through my husband's brain that it's not viable for me to take the bus here like it was in RI. The East Coast infrastructure is far fucking superior to the West Coast when it comes to public transportation. His argument is, "So, you just plan for that extra hour or two. Big deal." Plus the 20 minutes in Southwestern heat to walk to the bus stop at the top of the hill.

Southern California is not a representative sample of the West Coast.

True, but nothing is as superior as the Northeast Corridor. You know, the part of the country where people come from. The lack of anything other than freeways between San Diego and Los Angeles is fucking unnerving to me, considering the distance between New York and Boston is greater by 200 miles, and I could still commute effectively between the two as needed. I know about the streetcar controversy, but I think that by this point they would have had it worked out. Considering how vast parts of the country views spending money on any kind of infrastructure that may touch tax dollars, it's amazing half our goddamn interstates are functional at all.

13
Trying to figure out ways to get it through my husband's brain that it's not viable for me to take the bus here like it was in RI. The East Coast infrastructure is far fucking superior to the West Coast when it comes to public transportation. His argument is, "So, you just plan for that extra hour or two. Big deal." Plus the 20 minutes in Southwestern heat to walk to the bus stop at the top of the hill.

YES BIG DEAL. I am NOT taking a bus for an hour and a half when I can drive there in 10 fucking minutes. He has a motorized bike, he made it in order to commute back and forth to work, but alas, it takes a whole hour instead of a half hour! *gasp* AND HE JUST LEGIT CAN'T HANDLE, but you know, I should take the bus to the light rail, which takes an hour,  when the nearest stop is 3 minutes away by car. The bike is also broken. He has the parts to fix it, and has for about a month, but he won't do it, because he's gotten so used to having the car. But you know, now I'm working, and I need it, and he's freaking out.

The only thing I can think of us take the car away and hide it while I'm in South Dakota, and let him fend for himself. I'm sure that bike would get fixed awfully fast.

He should have put the money into the other car, and shipped it here when he had the chance, but nooooooo...It's sitting in the long term lot at the base back east, while he continues to wreck my Subaru by not getting the brakes fixed, and not fixing the soft hose, and not getting oil changes, and then yells at me when I talk about budgeting money to fix it when "he can do it himself." HE WON'T EVEN FIX HIS OWN FUCKING BIKE.

This is getting out of hand, it's not fair to me to have to get up at 5am to take him to work so I can have my damn car.

I have GOT to find a way to get this through his head without resorting to something cruel or drastic, because that's not nice or how marriages work, but he has to experience the inconvenience himself in order to fix the problem. Fucking engineers.  :argh!:


14
The Richard Nixon school of ballet and the arts / Re: Academia Ghetto Thread
« on: September 06, 2016, 01:00:42 am »
My first module for my professional certificate program starts tomorrow. It's an online course offered through Cal State Long Beach, and its for collection management and care of costume and textiles in a museum setting. Conservation, preservation, etc. History is over, now I get to learn the SCIENCE. I find it generally hilarious, and yet not at all surprising, to become a specialist in a museum field takes another year or so of extra work on top of a graduate degree. Because I haven't spent enough money yet.  :roll:

Is that like a post-doc fellowship sort of thing?

Not really. You get paid for post-docs, and they're typically research positions, which I'll probably end up doing once I finish my PhD someday. This is a professional designation, or certificate for post-MA grads to make them a specialist in their field for doing practical work versus academic work. A conservator has to have a specialization, so while I have the MA in museum studies which gives me the basic knowledge of the systems and processes, the specialization certificates are what set me in a specific field. So I'll be doing textiles and costumes (shock, I know) while some other folks do sculpture and pottery, paintings, etc. Each require a very specific skill set, so you really can't do each of them. I mean, I'm sure I could, but that would take a while, and I want to start working.

In addition, conservation specialists also work in archaeological lab to help process and preserve finds. So that's more of what I'd like to do. So in addition to having the historical and archival knowledge, now I need a healthy dose of basic organic chemistry and learn textile-specific treatments. It's short, only 5 1-month classes, and then 120 hours of fieldwork. Then I'm good to go to enter a conservation lab.

So it's a certificate program? That makes sense.

Yeah. I need the additional exp points, but there's no way in hell I have the brain capacity to continue to my PhD right now. The amount of work I had to do for my master's was intense, and I didn't see my husband through most of it. My mind is still fucking broken from my thesis, to the point when I had to give a presentation on it last month, I actually didn't want to look at it again. But, so many people are interested in my work, and it's currently under review for presentation at Kalamazoo at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, which is the largest conference of its type in the world.

 I'm also working on a paper about cotton cultivation in medieval Anatolia and the culture of cotton garments from Byzantium into Western Europe, which probably sounds boring, but we were under this assumption that cotton didn't make it to Europe until much later, despite consistent cultivation in Egypt through most of the classical period. Farms in Anatolia means that the Byzantine Empire was controlling the trade like they were controlling their silk, but still only giving the cotton to the military and lower classes. It reads like, "You can't have this, it's OUR garbage!" There has to be more to it than that, though I wouldn't put it besides the Byzantines to bogart even inferior fibers.

15
All I can offer for this post is :mittens:. The punchline was gold.


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