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Messages - Mesozoic Mister Nigel

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1
I feel completely insulted. I hope that the end result is that she does too.

2
1900 words, lady. And a whole lotta snark.

3
So the grad student who taught the last couple of weeks of neurophysiology decided last-minute that since she was giving us material that was way beyond the biology knowledge of most of the class, instead of having an online multiple-choice final, she would just basically have us write 250-word answers to five questions.

Problem: The only way to pad out some of these concepts to 250 words is to talk about them as if you're explaining them to someone who has never taken a biology class and doesn't know what DNA is.

I've just gone right ahead and gone there. It's snarky as fuck, and I don't even fucking care.

4
First day free of the prehumans. A lot of the kids were really broken up about me leaving the YMCA, which I didnt expect. Got a lot of nice goodbye notes from the kids and a surprising number of them actually burst into tears. Even one of my worst students was sad to see me go, and we practically had a Wile E. Coyote and Roadrunner kind of relationship.

Aw, that means you're a good teacher. :) Way to go!

5
That very well could be Nigel. If so it is mass apophenia(had to look it up). Lots of folks around this town have a fairly sincere nature and seem quite convinced,  but that is the nature of local legends and inconsistent accounts.

Well, it really only takes one or two bloggers/smalltime journalists to outline the perceived pattern, and people will catch on to it and repeat it. The whole question, though, really hinges on the data, which shouldn't be hard to a journalist to track down. What are the statistics for accidental drownings in those states? Are they actually suspicious or unusual? The police have this data, and yet are labeling these drownings coincidental, accidental deaths by drowning. So if the people who have the data are saying "Nope, nothing unusual here folks", then either the the data in fact points to nothing unusual, OR the authorities are conspiring to cover up a massive 11-state, 18-year-long (if you count the earliest victim at 1997), 40+ victim serial murder spree.

Orrrr, possibly, (without even delving into the claim that all of the drowned have been white), college-age young men have been managing to get drunk and accidentally falling into rivers (if you assume that all the ones who are missing actually drowned) at the rate of approximately one every five years in each of the states claimed to be involved. That's distributing the drownings per year across the claimed 11 states, but I would bet that if we looked at the numbers they are heavily concentrated in college towns that have a river near the university.



6
Or Kill Me / Re: Uncurious monkeys
« on: Yesterday at 07:16:30 pm »
Oh here we go, here's a video that's really accessible. I was crediting Tierney when really I should have been crediting Fuchs. Totally my error... not that Tierney isn't also an  excellent researcher.

http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/2012/06/elaine_fuchs_going_forward_in_reverse/

7
Or Kill Me / Re: Uncurious monkeys
« on: Yesterday at 07:07:22 pm »
In some cases, it's really the only window we have into understanding certain functions... I mean, look at Tierney's work with reverse genetics. Personally, I'm largely interested in what's going on in our brains when everything's working just right, but the technology for looking at that is brand-new, and the context for understanding it is largely dependent on what we've learned about brain structure by looking at injuries.

Trying to check out an accessible primer on this Tierney character - my memory's mucky much like my understanding of the subject.

[PS.  Forgive quoted date mismatch - correct one took too long to delete =]

Let me see if I can find something... it was pretty groundbreaking for identifying gene function. Does this paper make sense to you? http://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/advanced/topics/Pages/ReverseGeneticTools.aspx

8
Interesting. I'll look into it. There's an ongoing spree in LaCrosse and along the Mississippi. No cops have opened up. They will discuss drugs, gangs, but not this.

http://mobile.onmilwaukee.com/buzz/articles/smileyfacekiler.html

every year like clockwork and about the same season. There are even NDAs I'm told that the local radio consortium makes talent sign to not discuss it.

LaCrosse runs on college and smuggling money. The cover up is intense. I suspect a cabal of some sort in that the killer has always managed to separate full grown men and drown them without a reported mark. That they're always white may be a factor too, but it's not really a sure indicator of racism.

One of the ones mentioned was Native American. I've looked at a couple of other articles as well, and they mention 40 men in 11 states over the last decade. Race and age breakdown was not given for those men.

There is a lot of information missing. Most glaringly, the rate at which men went missing or were found drowned in those areas in the previous decades.

Other questions also need to be answered, such as how these disappearance/drowning rates compare to rates in other cities with rivers running through them, and whether there are other reasons black men might not be drowning in the same numbers, such as a  greater likelihood of sticking together due to a history of violence against lone black men.

It might be worth noting that I found a case of a 23-year-old black man who drowned in the Black River last summer, which also raises the question of whether there are other cases of black men drowning that the serial killer theorists are disregarding because they don't fit the profile that makes their theory work.

Quite honestly, living in an area where people disappear and drown on a regular basis, I find it hard not to see this as a great example of apophenia.

9
Or Kill Me / Re: Asking the right questions
« on: Yesterday at 04:38:44 pm »
The late teens and the 20's are an exploratory time for most people; the big question tends to be "what kind of person am I and what is my purpose?" You're approaching an invisible developmental milestone, which is the end of the growth stage of your prefrontal lobes. The longer you remain in an exploratory self-discovery mode, the longer they will continue to develop (this seems to be a good thing) until maybe around 25-26, although nobody knows for sure.

Drugs, alcohol,internet, and video games can be escapism for some people, as can work or relationships or home improvement; you only need to figure out whether you're using it as a form of escapism. The main question is whether you find what you're doing fulfilling... do you, personally, find value in it?

I think questions about being a good person are valuable. We all have to find meaning in our own ways. For myself, I found meaning in my own understanding of human existence and the nature of the universe, which is that there is no reason for us to exist, we simply do, and then we die.


10
Or Kill Me / Re: Uncurious monkeys
« on: Yesterday at 10:41:20 am »
I don't think it's guts, or willingness, that I lack, it may be ability (look, something I'm blind to!). Haven't I already admitted that those were loaded questions? Assuming people's lack of interest in x is caused by a lack of curiosity, and fishing for confirmation that there's something strange and mildly negative about it?

And I am aware that there's quite a few reasons people may not be interested, chiefly that they have already been exploring a subject and moved on, and also personal differences in openness to new experiences being attuned to different things and blind to others. Myself included. It just doesn't seem to me like that's all.

Am I still missing your point?

I was making assertions here because it seemed to me like we could be miscommunicating and I wanted to clarify exactly what I'm trying to say. I might simply be misunderstanding what you are saying, though. :) How am I not curious about people? I'm not extrapolating about a person from a single instance, I may add. All the individuals I've used in examples were people I consider my friends, genuinely like, and interact with often enough to see whatever I'm describing was not aberrant behavior. Maybe I should have mentioned this. None of them are shallow or stupid people, and that makes it all the more perplexing. And there's plenty of people I know who are not like this, people who'll bite into anything interesting you show them, who will talk about any subject, people who pay attention. Why are they this way, when others aren't? Simply personal difference?

But you're still not actually going to put any time or thought into taking apart your own questions and critically examining the assumptions behind them, are you?

11
More hilarity.  Jim was boinking Lilly.  Jim's wife found out, and called their old friend Mike T, who just happens to be president of NA operations.

Jim got retired.  Lilly is still here. 

All the projects that are failing are gathering up, and are about due to be hung around the plant manager's neck.  And the plant manager is now...Lilly.

Mike T has a vicious sense of vengeance.

(I have to say that I am absolutely stunned that Jim, the quintessential good boy, was cheating.  Especially given that his wife is prettier than Lilly, smarter than Lilly, and - unlike Lilly - has emotions beyond those possessed by reptiles.)

Needless to say, I am willing to help this train wreck along.  Oh, yes.  Jim is the best boss I ever had, regardless of his personal failings, and I will have revenge.

WHOA.

Oh, that's messy as fuck.

12
This is fucking creepy.

13
So I went on an epically lovely date with the old man tonight, and then woke up and made him take me home at 3 am because I have a horrid sore throat. :(

That, and his dogs are a bit crowdy. Between the two factors I was not sleeping at all. At least it was a lovely date, though.

14
What colour was the dress Leonard Nimoy wearing while he died watching 50 Shades of Grey?  You wont believe what millenials said!  Click here for the listicle.

 :lol:

15
The snarky side of me said, "at least we won't have to see any more posts about the color of that damn dress."

One of the students I was tutoring said something about this "dress problem" yesterday. I told her she should bring it up in class; after all, it's a Perception class.

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