Author Topic: Pagans/New Age and the far right  (Read 3514 times)

Cain

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Pagans/New Age and the far right
« on: January 10, 2014, 12:25:21 pm »
New thread for the previous discussion in the Open Bar (title chosen for lack of a better term).

For those who didn't read the posts, a quick recap:

I've spent a bracing morning reading about Le Veilleurs, Schwaller de Lubicz, Synarchy and interwar occult fascist movements.

It's more fun than filling in a job application form, anyway.

This was spurred on by reading The Stargate Conspiracy, which is despite the name actually quite interesting and fairly grounded.

Essentially, the book asks the question "what the hell is going on with this New Age Egyptology fetish all of a sudden" (this was in the late 1990s) and comes away with some pretty disturbing conclusions.

It also includes our old friends The Nine, for those who read the notes from Sinister Forces that I posted.  Essentially, the books authors trace the origins of The Nine, whatever they may be, back beyond Andrija Puharich and to Schwaller de Lubicz, an academic with a side interest in mystical fascism...and possibly Crowley (of course).

They come away with the conclusion that someone is trying to hijack New Age beliefs, mixing them with apocalyptic, fundamentalist Christianity and using these beliefs to take quite deliberate aim at Muslims and blacks.  Whether that's the intelligence community, mystical fascists or even The Nine (assuming one believes they really exist) is left up for the reader to decide.

Unfortunately, you have to go through quite a bit on the internal politics of the pyramidiots and Cydonian conspiracy types to get to the good stuff.  But it's worth it.

When you say "take quite deliberate aim", do you mean that it is anti-black and anti-muslim?

I'm going to have to read this someday, because I can't see how promoting Egyptology via New Age apocalyptic woo would do that.

Oh yes, very much so.

Well, apparently all races on earth were seeded by space alien gods...except black people, who are apparently a "control".  Race-mixing is apparently bad.  It's OK to nuke the Japanese because they are of the "4th race nervous system type" which is "defunct".  Islam is in thrall to the "dark ones" and shows signs of being philosophically influenced by the "dark ones".  A great battle between Light and Darkness is coming.  Jews denied Jesus as an Ascended Master (though the exact status of Jews tends to vary, with some saying they are also in thrall to the dark ones, and others saying they're cool, once they accept Jesus).

You basically combine Blavatsky with The Nine's own disturbing racial pronouncements and...well, a particular kind of political philosophy seems to be advocated.  It starts with a N and ends in -azism.

That's a rather... interesting... theology.  It's been a while since 1990 (which is disturbing to me, personally), do you feel this ever gained much traction?

Oh yes, absolutely.  However, since quite a few of them pinned their hopes on the year 2000, there was a subsequent hit to those beliefs...but they are very firmly entrenched within the New Age philosophy, with its love of syncretism and hatred of research or coherency.  A lot of The Stargate Conspiracy involves doing basic research on where people like Graham Hancock got things wildly wrong...not just according to the science and available knowledge, but even according to his own theories.

I had no idea there was a new age pack of bigots floating around for the past 20 years.

WHY AREN'T WE TROLLING THEM?

What do you think we were doing on MW and TCC?

I just think we didn't realise quite how widespread or deep the bigotry went.  Like most New Agers, in fact.

I may throw up a thread on this exact topic.

I thought they were just dumb.  You mean they were quite possibly pawns in some shadowy political group?

Isn't everyone?  For a given value of shadowy, of course.

The alternative/new-age fucktards in norway are making pedo accusations against people in the skeptic community. Shitstorms all the way.
I hate new-agers with the passion of a thousand mohammad alis.

I hate Causes in general.  They do that sort of thing to primates.

Oh shit. Do you remember how "Lena" reacted when I outted that she was associated with that CRAZY South African blog?

I remember it because I first posted in OM about it, and then she let slip (over at TCC) that she could view OM via Google searches. When I threw some of the meme key-words from the blog at her over @ wicca.com, she got all sorts of paranoid and started trying... well "passwords" on me, for lack of a better term.

I'm home now, so I'll look for the thread.

I do, that was fun.  For those who don't, start here.

I'm going to gather some notes together on this particular topic.  Stand by for updates...

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2014, 01:20:41 pm »
This shit is so weird.  I mean, I understand what cognitive dissonance is, but being able to conflate "all is one/higher cosmic conciousness/mother goddess/woo" with "this group of humans is inferior".

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2014, 01:30:45 pm »
I was honestly surprised to find such an abundance of fascist folk at MW when we landed there.  Me so naive.

Cain

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2014, 02:12:03 pm »
New Age woo also makes it exceedingly easy to declare people as less than human.  Or superhuman, or semi-divine or whatever.

So while all humanity may be one, it doesn't apply to dirty Jews and blacks because they're not even really human like the rest of us.

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2014, 03:04:07 pm »
one of these days I'm going to write an alternate american history novel in which, the religious right pairs with left wing politics instead of right wing politics. I think this would make for the most interesting pagan crowd, as they would be flinging themselves against liberal Christians instead of conservative Christians.

I mean, I get the sense that most pagans lean to the left -- but imagine if the majority of occult crystal people that own too many cats were also birthers, corporate apologists, and thought global warming was a hoax. It would be lulz on tap forever.

I can only guess at what a pagan "climate change is a hoax" ad campaign would look like. You think we arrogant humans can go toe to toe with Gaia? YOUR'E WRONG! Mother Earth is too strong to let CFCs make her sick.

Or imagine MSNBC reporting on the war on Christmas and the Fox anchors all saying Happy Holidays.

IMAGINE THAT INSTEAD OF A CREATIONIST MUSEUM THERE IS A GREEK CREATION MYTH MUSEUM. TEACH THE CONTROVERSY!



You can start to see a glimmer of it when the right wing talking heads go after Pope Francis for being too liberal. I am just praying that he keeps steering the Catholic church hard left, and the right wing shorts itself out trying to process the cognitive dissonance.


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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2014, 04:49:09 pm »
New Agers tend to lean toward the Left, but there is a very distinct divide between New Agers and Pagans. Most of the Pagans I have encountered lean toward the right, often even toward a sort of Fundamental Paganism. They are typically individualists and capitalists with a strong sense of tribalism and little regard for people outside of their tribe. Because they embrace magical thinking, they tend to be big on the "personal responsibility" trope, and are essentially Calvinist Pagans; if things go wrong in someone's life, it's because they are doing things wrong, aren't doing magick right, have offended the Gods, etc.

Therefore, by extension, they feel comfortable taking full credit for everything that goes right in their lives; if they are making money it's fully to their own credit, because they did the right magicks and pray to the right Gods, etc.

Of course, like all such individualists, they also tend to be enormous hypocrites, and see nothing wrong with being on welfare or otherwise living off the kindness of others while simultaneously condemning those on welfare, because in their case it's always special and justified, not like those other people.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”


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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2014, 04:29:29 am »
Both groups are big on cultural appropriation. They don't LIKE Those People, you understand, but they love making dumbed-down, white versions of things from other ethnic groups. And both groups exhibit cult-like behaviors (excessively zealous and unquestioning commitment to belief systems, ideologies, etc.; questioning, doubt, and dissent are discouraged, etc.) But yes, the Wayne Dyer crowd is less blatantly fucked up than the pagan crowd.

Under the surface, I'm not so sure.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2014, 04:55:11 am by Tiddleywomp Cockletit »
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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2014, 04:56:27 am »
New Agers tend to lean toward the Left, but there is a very distinct divide between New Agers and Pagans. Most of the Pagans I have encountered lean toward the right, often even toward a sort of Fundamental Paganism. They are typically individualists and capitalists with a strong sense of tribalism and little regard for people outside of their tribe. Because they embrace magical thinking, they tend to be big on the "personal responsibility" trope, and are essentially Calvinist Pagans; if things go wrong in someone's life, it's because they are doing things wrong, aren't doing magick right, have offended the Gods, etc.

Therefore, by extension, they feel comfortable taking full credit for everything that goes right in their lives; if they are making money it's fully to their own credit, because they did the right magicks and pray to the right Gods, etc.

Of course, like all such individualists, they also tend to be enormous hypocrites, and see nothing wrong with being on welfare or otherwise living off the kindness of others while simultaneously condemning those on welfare, because in their case it's always special and justified, not like those other people.

I think that this is somewhat a factor in my religious exploration thing. Supposedly leftist religion that otherwise matches up with my ideals is strangely racist, fascist, antiabortion and procapitalist.

In otherwords, it's shockingly easy to find profascist Pagans. I have quite a bit more to say but I just can't put it into words other than my default religion is Irish Paganism, and fuck all Pagans. If that makes sense.

I mean, I guess it's easier to express than elaborate. I was an anti-Catholic Roman Catholic.
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LMNO

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2014, 05:21:25 am »
Both groups are big on cultural appropriation. They don't LIKE Those People, you understand, but they love making dumbed-down, white versions of things from other ethnic groups. And both groups exhibit cult-like behaviors (excessively zealous and unquestioning commitment to belief systems, ideologies, etc.; questioning, doubt, and dissent are discouraged, etc.) But yes, the Wayne Dyer crowd is less blatantly fucked up than the pagan crowd.

Under the surface, I'm not so sure.

In retrospect, this should have been apparent.  If it wsn't for my privilege, that is.  a bunch of middle-class white kids claiming spiritual affinity with an ethnic god that they did little to no anthropological research on?  That's just RUDE.

Cain

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2014, 11:38:05 am »
New Agers tend to lean toward the Left, but there is a very distinct divide between New Agers and Pagans. Most of the Pagans I have encountered lean toward the right, often even toward a sort of Fundamental Paganism. They are typically individualists and capitalists with a strong sense of tribalism and little regard for people outside of their tribe. Because they embrace magical thinking, they tend to be big on the "personal responsibility" trope, and are essentially Calvinist Pagans; if things go wrong in someone's life, it's because they are doing things wrong, aren't doing magick right, have offended the Gods, etc.

Therefore, by extension, they feel comfortable taking full credit for everything that goes right in their lives; if they are making money it's fully to their own credit, because they did the right magicks and pray to the right Gods, etc.

Of course, like all such individualists, they also tend to be enormous hypocrites, and see nothing wrong with being on welfare or otherwise living off the kindness of others while simultaneously condemning those on welfare, because in their case it's always special and justified, not like those other people.

Broadly speaking, I'd agree, but you see a lot of those traits among the New Agers as well, which lead to similar places.

Cain

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2014, 12:23:44 pm »
Some quotes from Lynne Pickett's The Stargate Conspiracy:

Quote
The teachings of the Nine emphasise that there are many civilisations throughout the galaxy, some of whom are banded together in a Star Trek-like Federation, but all of whom are more or less aware of the existence of the Nine. Some operate closely with them, because the Nine need them to interact with the inhabitants of the physical universe, including Altea and Hoova, the two civilisations that have played a major part in human history. Spectra, the conscious computer with which Uri Geller was alleged to have been in contact, is one of the lower forms of computerised intelligence operated by the higher entities.

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Altea and Hoova helped in the genetic manipulation — or ‘seeding’ — of the human race. According to the Nine, as reported through their channellers, one indigenous race already existed on Earth - the blacks, the only one actually to evolve here. This implicit racism caused hostility towards The Only Planet of Choice, but Tom has since stressed a belief in the equality of all races, and cautions against any racism based on a misunderstanding of their teachings. Some believe this sounds remarkably like damage limitation, and the suspicion of racism has remained in many critical minds.

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In fact, the Nine reveal a marked, if sometimes ambiguous, positive discrimination. According to them, the Jewish race was created by Hoova, as was Jesus, whom they call — rather inadvisedly, as it turns out - the ‘Nazarene’. The Jews are ‘the saviours of the planet’ and, directly descended from Hoova, are truly the ‘Chosen People’, with special powers and a momentous role in Earth’s history. They made a grave mistake in not accepting Jesus as their Messiah (who was sent from Hoova), though, so to rectify this and regain their rightful place in the scheme of things, they must first come ‘to acceptance’ - presumably of Jesus the Nazarene.

Obviously, this almost exactly parallels Christian Zionism, with the only difference being Christianity focuses on the convenant with God, whereas The Nine focus on an inherent, genetic superiority.  Either way though, they have to accept Jesus for some reason.  I have my suspicions about that, which I'll expand on later.

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According to Tom, Jesus and Jehovah are one and the same, and have a special relationship with the Nine. Jesus was ‘the last of us to visit planet Earth’. The Second Coming will take place as part of the mass landing, when Jesus will arrive as the Jewish Messiah. There are, it is claimed, secret records of Jesus, hidden in Egypt and Israel: ‘At the proper time there will be a correlation of finding these records within six months of each other.’The seeding of Earth was an experiment by the Nine to see how ‘the originals’ (the black races) would evolve in comparison with ’those that colonized’.

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This was hardly a smooth or peaceable process, for mankind’s genetic evolution has also been interfered with by the dark forces, usually said to hail from the Pleiades and often described simply as the ‘Others’, although they are also, more melodramatically, described as the followers of Satan — ‘the Beast’.

The Nine claim that the first colonisation from Hoova began in the Tarim Basin in Tibet, in 32,400 BCE. Atlantis was founded by colonists from Altea and existed for some 15,000 years in the region of the Caribbean/Yucatan/southern Mexico, roughly where Edgar Cayce placed the lost continent or island. This story is different, though: it was the Nine who destroyed Atlantis out of rage in 10,850 BCE — very close to the date so favoured by Cayce, Bauval and Hancock. Hurtak gives the end of Atlantis as 12,000 BCE, which disagrees with Tom’s date but has its own significance. After the destruction of Atlantis, the survivors became the founders of the civilisations of Egypt and Central and South America.

The Nine often seem to come across as jealous and demanding Gods - replete with tales of destruction of those who displeased them in some way.  Of course needless to say this is nothing like the actual Egyptian Gods, who did not demand worship or communicate with their followers.

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According to Tom, the Earth was created as a battleground, to enable the Nine to confront the Others (the Pleiadean followers of the Beast) on a physical level. Interestingly, this is reminiscent of the Gnostic battle between light and darkness, which seems to be similar to the imminent conflict now being predicted by Graham Hancock. Every being in the universe has to be incarnated on Earth at some point, in order to experience the delights, responsibilities and drawbacks of free will, which, Tom says, exist nowhere else in the universe - hence the book title The Only Planet of Choice. All other civilisations are subject to the government of higher intelligences, such as the Nine. The various races of the Earth were, it seems, created as an experiment in free will, with the black race, apparently, serving as a kind of ‘control’. As the Nine claim that the black races are Earth’s only indigenous people, they are not — like all other races — essentially part space-god. Tom says that this experiment was ‘to see in which manner the originals, that were not seeded, would evolve in comparison with those that colonized’.

No inference is drawn on this "experiment"'s (regardless of its highly unethical nature) results.  But obviously there is no experiment without the possibility of failure.

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The most complex and thought-provoking connection between the Nine and religion on Earth is found in The Keys of Enoch. Between its quasi-Biblical covers, it simmers with a Hellfire-and-damnation Old Testament zeal, besides containing strong messianic and apocalyptic elements. For example:

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And I was told by my guides, Enoch and Metatron, that I was not to eat of the false powers of the earth, nor encourage my seed to marry with the fallen spiritual races of the earth.

Yeah, race-mixing is bad.

Quote
The religious scheme of The Keys of Enoch is very interesting in that it is calculated to embrace all the major religions of the USA - or rather, of the white United States. It is a mixture of Old Testament Judaism and Christianity, and also speaks approvingly of Mormonism (which Hurtak regards as the direct heir of the Heliopolitan priesthood — an exceptionally unlikely scenario). Hurtak says very little directly about Islam, although it is one of the dominant religions among African-Americans. He refers to Muslims obliquely — perhaps not unexpectedly - as ‘the Children of Darkness’, which perhaps reveals what is, for him, the identity of the villains in the imminent battle for the Earth. (Tom is fairly evasive about the Muslims but conveys a negative attitude based on their treatment of women, and says that Islam has - unfortunately, of course — been influenced by the ‘Fallen One’.)

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Also rather disturbing is the Nine’s attitude to the Holocaust. They uphold the Jews as the Chosen People, but remonstrate with them for not accepting Jesus — ‘the last one of us’ — as Messiah. Tom speaks of the Holocaust, in which 6 million Jews were exterminated by Hitler, with huge sorrow, yet claims it was an act of self-sacrifice and salvation: The greatest portion of these six million came at that time to sacrifice self, to make your planet earth aware that there were those who would attempt to rule and control humanity. Tom also explained that the atrocity of the Holocaust was necessary for the creation of the state of Israel, an important part of the plan for Earth. Essentially the victims chose to be incarnated at this time and place and to be victims of the Holocaust as a selfless act of sacrifice to make us all aware that evil people existed ... At this point the thought occurs that Tom may represent the gods of our solar system but in this case surely our own morality has the edge? Aren’t we already aware of the existence of evil? Did we really need the horrible deaths of 6 million people to bring it home to us? (And Tom shares with many the misconception that the Holocaust only involved Jews. Of course, many thousands of others were killed by the Nazis, including members of specific groups such as gypsies, homosexuals and Jehovah’s Witnesses.) In any case, are we alone in finding Tom’s sweeping pronouncement about the Holocaust deeply offensive?

Gypsies, homosexuals and Jehovahs Witnesses (and Communists, lets not forget) aren't spritually enlightened like Jews though.  Yeah?  Yeah!

Seriously though, I've seen this pernicious idea peddled a lot.  Jews had to die for Israel to exist.  Never mind no-one bothered to ask those Jews what they felt about it, and the incredibly ahistorical nature of such an argument.  I mean, has no-one heard of the British Mandate, the Balfour Declaration, the Black Hand and the Arab revolts?  Of course not, that's modern history and it involves reading documents, instead of pulling facts out of your arse.  An Israeli state would have occured without WWII, the British plans for a Jewish state were laid down in 1937.

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The Nine’s basic message, and the reason they have made contact with certain humans recently, is that something has gone wrong with mankind’s genetic programming. This is causing problems, not only for Earth, but also for other civilisations who have to pass through incarnations here, so the Nine have to step in to put things right. Unsurprisingly this matches Hurtak’s system: he claims that something has gone wrong with humanity’s ‘programming’ and that, over the thirty-year-period that will end in 2003, the intelligences that rule the universe are coming to repair it by upgrading human intelligence. We have failed the program and, through Hurtak and the others, the ‘White Brotherhood’ (to which the Nine are subordinate) are trying to rectify the situation.

The precise nature of this malady is never made clear, but one could draw some disturbing conclusions based on the admonishment against race-mixing we saw above.

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Right from the start, the Nine pushed the idea of preparing for an imminent global upheaval, a purging or final showdown between the forces of light and darkness, something close to fundamentalists’ hearts as the great battle of Armageddon.

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As usual, it is Hurtak who uses the most blood-curdling words to describe this future upheaval: there is a ‘galactic war and housecleaning that is being completed throughout the universe’, a war that will also be manifested on Earth, with the coming apocalypse, followed by a golden age, in which a new form of government will arise. The ‘lesser brotherhoods’ of light who work with the ‘younger spiritual teachers’ of Earth are now being ‘forced out of their positions of power’ so that the ’greater forces of Light will externalize on the earth plane’.

Quote
Hurtak goes on to warn that ‘materialists who seek to destroy the world ... will be as desiccated mud when the foundations of the earth are removed’. Hurtak is nothing if not patriotic, declaring that the centre of the new ‘Spiritual Administration’ will arise in America, the heir to Atlantis, which he refers to as Altea-America. He also often indulges in a serious pun when mentioning the rise of the New JerUSAlem ...

Again, aligning with certain fundamentalist claims about America being the new spiritual and moral centre of the Universe...

Cain

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2014, 12:27:05 pm »
Quote
One possible explanation is that the events surrounding the Nine constituted a long-term experiment into the psychology of ‘contactee cults’ of the kind that have become so prevalent since the Second World War, aiming to answer certain intriguing questions. For example, how easy is it to convince a group of ordinary people that they really are ‘chosen’ by some superhuman entity to carry an important message to the world? How can such a belief persuasively be passed on beyond the initial circle to a wider public? And what kind of people will accept the message, and who will reject it? It is known that the security services have long taken an interest in such cults, as Jacques Vallée has frequently testified, seeking explanations for how such beliefs originate and spread, for reasons that are entirely understandable. For example, quasireligious cults and small but subversive political groups have the potential for great social unrest and worse — the Nazis started small, after all — and they are often used for criminal and anti-social purposes, such as drug trafficking or gun-running.

The sinister potential of cults occasionally surfaces: Swiss and French authorities have been alert to such dangers since the mass suicides of the Order of the Solar Temple, whose beliefs included the existence of extraterrestrials from Sirius, and the similar suicides of members of the Star Trek-influenced Heaven’s Gate cult in 1996. A number of the earliest UFO contactee cults that emerged soon after the flying saucer craze of the late 1940s were centred on individuals who were members of American fascist organisations. For example, William Dudley Pelley, prewar supporter of Hitler, founded a fascist group called the Silver Shirts of America in 1932 and was interned for the duration of the Second World War. Fascinated with mystical and esoteric ideas, in the late 1940s Pelley claimed to be in telepathic contact with extraterrestrials, writing a book about his experiences called Star Guests (1950).

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Another ‘sister’ school in this movement was, if anything, more controversial than the Esalen Institute. This was est (Erhard Sensitivity Training), the organisation founded in 1971 by Werner Erhard, a former Scientologist - and used car salesman — who decided to exploit and adapt some of Scientology’s concepts and techniques for his own self-improvement system. The now notorious est held seminars that attracted such celebrities as Buzz Aldrin, Yoko Ono, John Denver and the future UFO abduction researcher John Mack, but it wasn’t long before est became a dirty word. Attendees were disturbed by the fascistic regime and zombielike demeanour of the members, as well as Erhard’s own dictatorial control of the organisation. Media disapproval was intense, and soon est was relegated to the scrapheap of dangerous cults. Erhard himself fled from the United States after press revelations about his private life and financial affairs. He is now believed to be somewhere in Russia. Tellingly, Erhard’s real name was John Rosenberg, but it is said that he changed his name ‘to replace Jewish weakness with German strength’. (His father was Jewish, but had converted to Episcopal Christianity.) Erhard had close links with the Esalen Institute and gave funds to SRI’s remote-viewing project.

The SRI's remote viewing program was closely associated with the circle of people in contact with The Nine, and a number of parapsychological research programs apparently carried out for the Pentagon and US intelligence community.  As I recall, Peter Levenda had uncovered even more overtly fascist links to est, but I'd need to go into my files to discover exactly what they were (though fascist movements in South America ring a bell).

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The Human Potential Foundation received funding from several prominent individuals, including Laurence Rockefeller. Its employees included Dick Farley, who resigned in 1994 after three years as director of program development. From his inside knowledge, Farley has become extremely concerned about the increasing influence of the Council of Nine over politicians and decision-makers. He writes that the Nine ‘maintain a working network of physicists and psychics, intelligence operatives and powerful billionaires, who are less concerned about their “source” and its weirdness than they are about having every advantage and new data edge in what they believe is a battle for Earth itself.'

Yeah, that does sound like the US intelligence community.  Or most of Wall Street.  When confronted by alien space Nazi gods, I would imagine the response of something like the CIA would be "what can they do for us" and not "what are the long term consequences of trusting alien space Nazi gods".  Long-term consequences are for little people.

Because people are stupid like that.

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In an email in August 1998, Jack Sarfatti told us he was amazed at our discovery that the Nine had been known of for fifty years: he thought they dated only from the 1970s. But we were to discover that even half a century fails to cover the whole story of their strange, disquieting genesis. In the same bubbling cauldron from which the Nine was to emerge, also lay the misshapen homunculi of twentieth-century totalitarianism. We found that some of the key figures intimately involved in the Nine’s lengthy gestation are surprising, not to say unsettling. The story includes such figures as L. Ron Hubbard, the consistently controversial founder of the Church of Scientology, and the flamboyant magus Aleister Crowley, who may or may not have earned his tabloid soubriquet of ‘The Wickedest Man in the World’, but who certainly relished such notoriety.

Because its not a proper conspiracy theory without Crowley and Hubbard getting involved.

Quote
Godfather of the New Egyptology R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz has had extraordinary influence on the New Egyptology, on the thought and writing of John Anthony West, Graham Hancock, Robert Bauval and many others. Although, since his death in 1961, he has become a kind of ‘godfather’ to such writers, Schwaller de Lubicz was, in many ways, hardly a laudable role model. His ideology — and the company he kept - would hardly endear him to today’s politically correct reading public, which is presumably why his bestselling admirers fail to mention them.

We noted earlier that Schwaller de Lubicz emphasised the significance of the number nine in the ancient Egyptian religion, and also that he — uniquely — translated the Egyptian neter, meaning ‘god’, as ‘principle’, often speaking of the ‘Nine Principles’. He wrote:

Heliopolis teaches the metaphysics of the Cosmic Opus by revealing the creative act that scissions the Unity Nun; it also speaks of the birth of the Nine Principles, the entire basis on which the sensorial world will establish itself in becoming accessible to human intelligence.

He stresses that the Ennead are ‘the Nine Principles’: Pharaonic myth illustrates this through the Heliopolitan Mystery, recounting the creation of the Great Ennead (the Nine Principles) born of Nun, the primordial waters. Schwaller de Lubicz’s wife Isha (this was her mystical name - originally she was just Jeanne) explained:

The Neters were not what have been infantily called ‘the gods’, as they are not ‘gods’... The Neters are the Principles, they are the symbols of functions.

This is exactly how the Council of Nine first introduced themselves to Andrija Puharich through Dr Vinod back in 1952. It was not just the term ‘Nine Principles’ that Schwaller de Lubicz shared with the Council of Nine, but also the same mystical interpretation of the numbers one to nine and their relationship with the number ten. As he wrote in 1913:

‘As number it is 10, containing and surrounded by the nine principles, the irreducible One, the eternal fecundator.‘

And John Anthony West wrote in Serpent in the Sky:

‘The Grand Ennead ... is not a sequence, but the nine aspects of Tum [Atum].‘5

This perfectly reflects the words of Tom (allegedly Atum) himself in 1974: ‘We are the nine principles of the Universe, yet together we are One.’

This seems to be too much of a coincidence. Had the Council of Nine read Schwaller de Lubicz, or had he written those words while under their influence, way back in the early years of the twentieth century? His master work, the three-volume Le temple de l‘homme (The Temple of Man) was published in 1958, six years after the ‘Nine Principles’ had introduced themselves to Puharich through Dr Vinod. However, the key neter/Principle interpretation also appeared in Schwaller de Lubicz’s similarly named Le temple dans l‘homme (The Temple in Man), published in 1949. (It would have been very obscure in terms of its influence in the United States as it was published only in French and with a very small print run in Cairo. An English-language edition did not appear until the 1970s.) Schwaller de Lubicz first published his mystical interpretation of the number nine as long ago as 1913, in a series of articles he wrote for the French Theosophical journal Le Théosophe, where he described the number ten as ‘containing and surrounded by the nine principles; the irreducible One, the eternal fecundator’. But at that time he did not elaborate: the parallel with the Egyptian Ennead came later.

Just in case it wasn't clear, Schwaller de Lubicz was a fascist.  Strongly anti-semitic, reactionary, involved in aristocratic counterrevolutionary circles and movements...there's no other word that more accurely describes his political philosophy.

LMNO

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2014, 01:37:20 pm »
Well, my brain just started to slip a little bit.

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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2014, 06:08:24 pm »
What's with the seeming fascination of supposed Pleiadians in various forms of bullshit?
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Re: Pagans/New Age and the far right
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2014, 06:11:49 pm »
Very visible star cluster = lots of meaning in various cultures = ancient knowledge of the alien space people.

The first two make sense, but the third is a bit of a leap.