Author Topic: Ancient Astronomy  (Read 901 times)

Brother Mythos

  • Outlandish
  • ***
  • Posts: 9288
    • View Profile
Ancient Astronomy
« on: July 01, 2016, 09:05:36 am »
‘A 6,000-year-old telescope without a lens’

‘prehistoric tombs enhanced astronomical viewing’ (Expanded title from original RAS press release)

“Astronomers are exploring what might be described as the first astronomical observing tool, potentially used by prehistoric humans 6,000 years ago. They suggest that the long, narrow entrance passages to ancient stone, or ‘megalithic,’ tombs may have enhanced what early human cultures could see in the night sky, an effect that could have been interpreted as the ancestors granting special power to the initiated.”

Here’s the link: http://astronomynow.com/2016/06/30/a-6000-year-old-telescope-without-a-lens/

And, for those interested, here’s the link to the original Royal Astronomical Society press release. Be advised however, it’s the same text, but you have to click on the two picture links in order to view them:

https://nam2016.org/press-releases/95-a-6-000-year-old-telescope-without-a-lens-prehistoric-tombs-enhanced-astronomical-viewing

Brother Mythos

  • Outlandish
  • ***
  • Posts: 9288
    • View Profile
Re: Ancient Astronomy
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2016, 09:10:32 pm »
‘Antikythera Mechanism May Have Been World's First 'STEM' Project’

I found the following quote from the article to be especially interesting:

‘… the researchers are adamant that this was not a one-off model. While such mechanisms depicting sophisticated astronomical models may have not been plentiful during this epoch, they were known among the Greco-Roman intelligentsia of the day.

“And the one we have was obviously not the first to be made,” said Jones. “ It is too complicated; too miniature to have been the prototype.”’

Here’s the link to the article: http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucedorminey/2016/06/30/antikythera-mechanism-may-have-been-worlds-first-stem-project/#4701d6b110c7

I believe interest in the Antikythera Mechanism has continued to grow as researchers have published more and more of their findings. Back in the ‘80s, the device had been placed all the way in the back of The National Archaeological Museum of Athens. If you weren’t looking at every single exhibit item, or specifically looking for the device, you could have walked right past it without noticing it. However, when I visited the museum a few years ago, it had been relocated to the front and center of the main entrance.

Mesozoic Mister Nigel

  • v=1/3πr2h
  • Deserved It
  • ****
  • Posts: 687093
  • The sky tastes like red exuberance.
    • View Profile
Re: Ancient Astronomy
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2016, 09:16:54 pm »
It's a pretty interesting old machine.
“I’m guessing it was January 2007, a meeting in Bethesda, we got a bag of bees and just started smashing them on the desk,” Charles Wick said. “It was very complicated.”


Clangador

  • Emperor of Clangluna
  • Known
  • *
  • Posts: 49
    • View Profile
    • Eris is my Co-Pilot.
Re: Ancient Astronomy
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2016, 12:16:19 am »

Very interesting.
~Clangador

I once waxed the floors of a nursing home, pulled off all the rubber feet on the walkers, and yelled "FIRE!"

nobodyhome

  • Known
  • *
  • Posts: 545
  • SPAG
    • View Profile
Re: Ancient Astronomy
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2017, 03:25:37 am »
I knew I should have left the window on my time machine closed when I went back to tour the Parthenon.

Brother Mythos

  • Outlandish
  • ***
  • Posts: 9288
    • View Profile
Re: Ancient Astronomy
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2017, 07:32:50 am »
‘Decoding the ancient astronomy of Stonehenge’

This site contains a short, but interesting, video clip of the layout of Stonehenge.

Here’s a quotation from the site:

‘The Stonehenge monument in England is known for its alignment with the summer solstice sunrise, and a is popular destination for revelers welcoming the longest day of the year. The inner “horseshoe” of the monument opens toward the point on the horizon where the sun appears on the day in June when the sun’s path is furthest North.

But on the same axis, in the opposite direction, is the point on the horizon where the sun sets on the winter solstice. And some experts suspect that the midwinter alignment may have been the more important occasion for the Neolithic people who built Stonehenge.’

Here’s the link: https://www.vox.com/videos/2017/6/21/15843570/astronomy-stonehenge-solstice